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What is the difference between a data journalist, graphics, CAR, news applications, etc?

I have realized as my interest has grown larger and larger for journalism that there are many different types. And also many different areas of journalism one may branch off into. I'm wondering what makes each of them different or so significant to the profession, that I may further educate myself. #journalism #broadcast-journalism #science-journalism #mass-communications #data-journalism


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Tatiane’s Answer

Hi, Racinda! How are you? The difference between all these types, in addition to specialization, is the practical application. A data journalist, for example, is a professional trained in the correct reading and interpretation of data. Which can be applied in the translation of financial market balance sheets, for example, as well as in complex documents of companies' economic results. Note that in addition to the skills of a journalist, opting for this specification, the professional will become hybrid, also developing the ability to understand numbers, graphs, and how to notify them to the audience in a simple way to be understood. As with news applications. In addition to mastering journalism techniques, the specialist also needs to understand how to deliver the news in the best way to the platform where it will be published. So, it is not enough to be a journalist who knows how to write. It is necessary to know how to write considering the user experience in news applications, the retention time, that is, the time that people spend reading the text, the size, the keywords, the most interesting terms in the searches, the structure text to be attractive for reading in applications. There are several factors that a "generalist journalist", so to speak, is not concerned during the practice of the profession, but which can be differentials that will highlight you in the market or help you to be a more valued professional.

Tatiane recommends the following next steps:

Try to understand what the market needs are and which ones you identify yourself with.
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Study the scope of the specialization you identified with to be clear about how much you can expand in knowledge.
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Look for volunteering or freelancing opportunities to test your new skills in practice and make sure you fit into that niche.
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Whenever you have the opportunity, keep studying and investing in improvement courses. Knowledge is never too much! ;)
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Tom’s Answer

Racinda,

The short answer: Specialization, or branching off into only one of those aspects of journalism, is no longer an option if you want a career in the field.

There was a time, not too long ago, where a data journalist, which is basically the same as CAR (computer-assisted reporting) and a graphics journalist (or graphic artist) and a photo-journalist were separate individuals who worked day-to-day within their specialty. That is infrequent now even at the largest newspapers and television stations due to staffing reductions, the cause of which is for another post.

In the "old days" (before the 2000s) of print journalism, for example, all but the most gifted started at small or mid-sized publications where the budget did not allow for hiring those with such specialties. If you didn't know how to create visual elements of storytelling like a graphic artist, or crunch data from online sources (or from hold-it-in-your-hands reference materials) or take at least a workable photo, you very quickly learned. Of course, the overall quality of the publication sometimes suffered, but it was a viable product that provided news and information for those it served - and jobs for journalists. In time, with personal initiative and success, the hope was you would move up the ladder in terms of publication size and prestige until you got to a news outlet that could afford to hire enough people and you could focus on your speciality for the most part. Today, that small-publication dynamic has reached its way to even the largest newsrooms. Add to that it helps to know the in-and-outs of television production, both on-air and as a producer, and certainly to possess stellar social media skills. Possessing as many media skills as possible, at the highest level you can achieve, will make you a better candidate for a job at a newspaper, radio, television station or online media outlet. I've performed certain skills necessary in all four mediums, in one day, many, many times. And I'm by no means unique.

The definitions of the terms you ask about can be found in the dictionary. The way to learn them are through school coursework, official or unofficial internships and learning how to turn the social media skills younger people already possess into any of the various online offerings any given media outlet will offer. If you don't know how to do something, admit it and ask someone who does for help. (You could probably tech that person things about social media he or she doesn't understand). We are all learning in this new age of journalism.

Don't be discouraged. Nobody knows how to do all of this stuff at first, if ever. Do what you love, adapt, and the money will follow. #journalism #broadcast-journalism #television #mass-communications #online-media #online-journalism #radio

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