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What professions combine an interest in English and Environmental Studies?

I'm slightly more passionate about English than Environmental Studies because I'm not into STEM-heavy subjects and would prefer to not take STEM classes, so on the ES side I'd prefer something related to Environmental Studies instead of Environmental Science. I enjoy the sustainability part of ES or maybe even policy; something that I could see making an impact on the world without being extremely scientific or involving a lot of labs or fieldwork. With English, I enjoy editing most, and would like to be an editor (with no preference for media type). I was thinking maybe something with environmental law, but I don't think I want to get through law school. If I could only choose one subject, I would choose English over ES. Are there any professions that combine my specific interests in these two subjects, besides something like blogging/freelance? english english-grammar environmentalstudies environmentalscience sustainability editing editor

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Sabina’s Answer

Some of the professions that combine English and Environmental Studies, are Environmental Analyst, Environmental Communicator, Environmental Educator, Environmental Lawyer,Environmental Planner, Teacher , Professor etc. Kindly check if any of these professions suits you.
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Lucas’s Answer

Just to expand on the idea of being an environmental lawyer, I think this is a potential career that you might find really blends your interests a lot and one in which you can make a real difference! Lawyers write a lot and read a lot, so the applicability of English is pretty clear. But they also do research and, if you are interested in politics as well, often can make real change either through legislation or even just by taking certain cases in court. If you are passionate about the environment and want to protect it, having the legal ability to do so is an excellent start! A JD is also a broad enough degree that you can go so many ways with it if it turns out being an attorney or politician for the environment is not your thing- it is helpful if you decide to start a non profit or charity (or even just assist one existing already), it will give you an advantage if you decide to go into consulting or business for environmentally focused businesses, and more! I would recommend, if this route is interesting, majoring in environmental studies and minoring in English- if you do end up going to law school, they would like the diversity that your major brings to them and you will get your share of reading and writing during the law school part of it all so the English minor would really be more for your interest.
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Simon’s Answer

Hi Amanda,

The good news is that many organizations look for graduates who possess strong verbal communication skills. Non-profits, private companies and government agencies all have positions within their environmentally-focused divisions that benefit from those skills. You may want to consider communication, development, fund-raising, recruitment, education or publication roles. What may benefit you is to explore how to gain skills in technical writing to a diversity of audiences. Many internships allow you to gain that experience and I would recommend focusing on NGOs initially if you are more interested in grass roots and community-centric approaches to problem solving, or government agencies and think tanks if you are more drawn to the policy side of things.

Even though you know you don't want to focus on STEM subjects, being able to write about environmental issues does require a foundation of understanding of what those issues involve - it doesn't mean you need a deep expertise, but you would require literacy in the scientific, social, economic and political aspects. Taking foundation environmental studies and sustainability courses to complement your English education would allow you to do that without having to focus too heavily on the physics, chemistry, biology and ecology involved.

I hope that's useful and good luck!
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Tamasyn’s Answer

Hi Amanda,

I would recommend keeping your options really open by taking either a double major Bachrlor of English and Environmental Studies. Or major in English, minor in ES. You may find what you enjoy changes at university so keeping your options open is good. There are a lot of Graduate Diplomas you can then complete within 1 year fulltime once you have a Bachelor's degree, if you find another path that interests you. You can even do a Grad Dip at a later stage. I'm about to start one next year!

Otherwise, you could look into writing for an environmental magazine or website, writing speeches or working at a non-profit or charity (you'll still get paid) in an area of sustainability that interests you.

You might enjoy eco-criticism which is analyzing how nature is treated within texts/novels etc. You could then get an English lecturer job and research eco-criticism, though this is very specific and jobs may be hard to find.

You could become a proofreader and specialise in sustainability texts. There are so many options. Keep your base broad and see what takes you interest once at uni I would say.

Hope this helps!
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electra’s Answer

There is environmental management studies. The requirement of scientific background is low, but you are put into management scenarios. This could be a better shift while you will be introduce to many environmental subjects. Whatever scientific course someone chooses, there is always an element of management involved in all jobs, therefore career options will be there.
Best of luck!
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