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What are some studying tips that you may recommend? For highschool, college, med. school, etc.?

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Angela D.’s Answer

Great question! Please note that you don't need to study harder, but smarter (please see explanation and website below). By doing so, you will free up a little more time for: precious sleep (crucial for memory formation/retention/retrieval); some exercise (endorphins are hormones/chemicals released by the brain that can relieve pain and stress); and more opportunities to prepare nutritious meals (you need brain food!). Some visual folks do well with homemade flashcards (word or question on the front, answer on the back) or condensing notes into blurbs that fit on a two-sided page so that they can "remember" what the two sides "look" like. Others are more auditory, so reading notes aloud or listening to previous lectures prompts recall later. Mnemonics (a pattern of letters, ideas, or associations that assists in remembering something) can also be helpful. Pacing yourself is important. Watch some shows that are stress relievers like comedy!

A brief summary of smarter studying is to eliminate multi-tasking and engage in high intensity habits (pre-testing, spaced practice, self-quizzing, interleaving practice, and paraphrasing/reflecting). Short term mastery can be attained with easier, less effective studying techniques...which may be enough to get you through a quiz/test, but not for long term memory/mastery.

Wishing you the best in your endeavors, Dr. B

https://www.edutopia.org/article/5-research-backed-studying-techniques
Thank you! Zemira M.
You are most welcome! Angela D. Blaver (Suissa), Ph.D. BACKER
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John’s Answer

Zemir when it comes to developing good study habits, there is a method to all of the madness. The type of study habits that you’ve come to practice in high school may not work so well in college. However, you can certainly build on those practices to make your study habits more disciplined—because you’ll need to! In college, you’ll have more responsibility, but you’ll also have more independence. For first-time college students, this could be a challenge to balance.

UNDERSTAND YOUR BEST LEARNING STYLE
It’s important to know that there are many different styles of learning and each person will retain information better in different ways. Think about which style of learning works best for you, and it will help you determine how to study, where to study when to study and other important factors like what study aids you should use and be aware of, and knowing what things may distract you while you are trying to study.
• Visual learners who learn best when pictures, images, and spatial understanding is used.
• Auditory learners who prefer using music, sounds or both.
• Kinesthetic learners actually use a more physical style of learning through using the body, sense of touch and hands.
• Logical learners need to use reasoning, logic, and systems.
• Verbal learners will prefer using words in writing and speech.
• Social learners will thrive in learning with other people or in groups.
• Solitary learners are able to learn best when alone.

MAKE STUDYING PART OF YOUR DAILY ROUTINE
What you do every day is more important than what you do occasionally, so make time for studying every single day, with or without exams coming up. Consistency is key and once you start getting into good study habits, so make it a routine that you will be able to maintain throughout the school year. Make studying your priority and place these sessions when you’re at your peak performance times to make them extra effective. Some people work best in the mornings, and others, at night. Experiment with this and don’t assume that because you wake early you should study early, but instead try morning, noon, and night to see which is best.

FIND A GOOD STUDY PLACE
This is important. You need to be in an environment with little to no distractions—an environment that will aid in keeping you focused on your assignments. Establish rules when you’re in your study zone. Let people living with you know that when your door is closed, it means you do not want to be disturbed. Try not to respond to phone calls or texts, this will break your concentration and you will lose focus. Even study lighting is also important. If you want to preserve your eyesight and maximize your time and energy, then choose lighting that will not cause eye strain or fatigue so you can keep your study session effective at any time of the day.

AVOID SOCIAL MEDIA
Speaking of distractions, nothing can sap away your time for a good 20-30 minutes like good old social media! Emails used to be the necessary evil in order to keep life going, but now people are communicating through social media platforms more than email or even talking on the phone! As a result, it’s pretty common to have a browser tab open just for social media. The problem with this is the alerts! As much as you may try to ignore it, you won’t be satisfied until you follow through with the alert—an alert that will most likely require a reply! In all likelihood, it will end up being a conversation that could’ve waited an hour—and now you’ve just added another 20-30 minutes to your study time! Congratulations!

JOIN OR CREATE A STUDY GROUP
Have we mentioned that college is hard work? It’s worth stating again. Finding fellow students who are struggling to understand the coursework can be comforting. However, joining or creating a study group isn’t just because misery loves company, it’s about teamwork. Guaranteed someone in your study group can help you through a certain assignment you’re struggling with and you’ll be able to do the same. It’s all about helping each other succeed!

ORGANIZE YOUR NOTES
Unless you are a legal transcriptionist, transcribing lecture notes can make your notebook look like a 7-year-old scribbled in it! That’s why it’s best to record your professors’ lectures so that you can get a better understanding of the lesson. The best way to do this is to transcribe the recorded lecture notes. This way, you can rewind what you didn’t understand. It also behooves you to revisit those notes—while the material is fresh in your mind and rewrite them in a style that’s more legible and review-friendly. On the day of the exam, you’ll be glad you did.

Hope this was Helpful Zemir
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Christine’s Answer

Zemira,

Great question - study habits don't always come easy, and some simple tasks will help you master the art of getting good grades.

1) Go to class and sit in front - you will find yourself more actively engaged - during this time of online and remote learning, you can remove all cell phones, email and distractions and pay close attention to the professor/teacher on line.
2) Take notes, even if you have them already printed out - you will retain as you write things down
3) Re-copy your notes after class.
4) Outline a study guide at least 3 days prior to the test - then you can review each day up to the test/exam.
5) Get a good night sleep and eat well - no alcohol or drugs!
6) Take a deep breath before you take your test and GO FOR IT! You studied hard and will benefit from the extra study habits.

Christine recommends the following next steps:

Buy a calendar if you don't already have one - electronic calendar apps are fine too.
Write all of your classes and exams for the semester/school year in your calendar.
Add "prepare study guide" at least 3 days prior to the test/exam and "study for xxxxx" on the days up to the exam
Review all of your study guide and notes right before the exam to get a last minute snapshot of the material
Take the test and get a good grade, hopefully an A!.
Thank you very much! Zemira M.
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Cameren’s Answer

Honestly, it is hard to give studying tips because the only person who knows how you learn best is yourself. I will say that it is important to note that how you study in high school and university will most likely differ. I personally know that in order for me to learn I need to stay organized. I would suggest keeping a separate notebook and folder for each course/class and investing in a planner. I love planners from plumper.com because you can customize them to fit your specific needs. However, they are a bit pricey so any planner will work. In my planner the night before I write myself out a schedule for the next day with specific times for what I am studying and use that as a loose guide for throughout the day. I think this is an important step, especially if you have a lot of work to do, because it helps the process feel less overwhelming. Also while studying I suggest putting all devices on do not disturb and any device that is distracting (cellphone) should be put away until breaks. And do not forget to take breaks! Get a good amount of sleep after study, research has shown that getting quality sleep helps in retaining information.

As for the actual event of studying, start by giving your self a set amount of time for each subject with breaks in between and make sure you're in an environment that best suits you (i.e., completely quiet, or a peaceful space with some background noise), try not to be somewhere where you will easily get distracted. Here is where you will choose what works best for you. If you are studying for a test maybe make a quizlet for multiple choice or definition type questions, have someone else quiz you on the material (it is better than quizzing yourself as you are likely to let yourself off the hook when answering questions, i.e, "I basically said that" or "I actually knew that answer"). I would start out with a quiz of sorts in order to determine what information you already know and what material you need to dedicate time to, there is no reason to spend hours reviewing information you already know. Once you determine the specifics of what you need to study, I would review the material. The method of reviewing will be specific to you but could include things like reviewing notes from class, reading from the book/lectures and marking important information, or using the learn feature. After spending a decent amount of time reviewing, I would suggest taking another quiz to see if you have improved and repeat the process until you are happy with your results.

Again, studying is very specific to the person as different methods will work better for people with various learning types. Learning how to successfully study will be a trial and error process so if something isn't working don't be afraid to switch it up. I hope this was helpful!
Much appreciated! Zemira M.
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Ciara’s Answer

Hey Zemira!

I would suggest organizing your work space, this helps having everything clear in front of you. Another suggestion would be to create flow charts, diagrams, mind maps - this is a great way to throw down buzz words with a small definition on a piece of paper. Don't forget to take regular breaks too!
Also, if there is pass papers to work from, this would be a great way to get a feel for what way the questions could be asked!


Best of luck with your studies! :)
Ciara
Much appreciated! Zemira M.
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Jad’s Answer

There’s really quite a lot of ways to find better ways of studying:

-Check your class website to see if your professor includes any additional study references, examples, or other materials.

-Look up YouTube videos to explain some topics that you need a refresher on.

-Create study groups and connect with classmates afterwards.

-Keep study areas distraction free and make sure you are not cramming all nighters, study a bit throughout the entire week
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Taylor’s Answer

Hello!
1. Out of sight out of mind - if the distractions are physical (ex: phone) then put it in another room while you need to focus
2. Time block - if you tell yourself you'll focus for 30 minutes straight and then take a break to enjoy something, you'll be far more motivated to crank out your work!
3. Remember to take those breaks - I highly do not recommend working straight for more than an hour. Your brain needs breaks!
4. Get enough sleep, exercise and nutrition to ensure your brain is working optimally
5. Gather a support system - have parents, friends, spouses, colleges, etc. hold you accountable for your goals


Hope this is helpful!
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Nick’s Answer

Do your assigned homework. The exams are typically based on the material assigned. If you did your homework well then you should pass the test.
Thank you! Zemira M.
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alex’s Answer

Hi Zemira!

There is no "one size fits all approach" to studying - I think it is best to test multiple techniques, as others have mentioned, and find what works best for you. One of the items that's helped me out when I've needed to study for school or work has been setting a schedule that balances study needs and other activities. I like to be an active person and will lose my concentration if I'm doing a single task (studying in this case) for too long. I will try to schedule 45 minute periods of very concentrated work, with 15 minute break periods to get a snack, walk outside, or get a small task completed. Knowing that I'll have this time to "unwind" allows me to focus very intently during my 45 minute study periods. I hope this suggestion helps!
Yes it does! Thank you! Zemira M.
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