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Whats the most difficult part about being a radiologist?


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Jason’s Answer

Hello,

I am not a radiologist, however I worked in an office for many years when I was in college. First, you should consider doing that- clerical, billing, or anything you can do simply to get in the door. I learned an incredible amount of medical information while being there as well as the emotions that the staff and patients can experience.

Radiologists, at least when I worked where I did which was both in a hospital and private setting, sit in a dark room and use specific lighting to see as best they can when looking at films. With newer technology, this has likely changed but either way you work through reading films all day.
The only time I saw a radiologist interact with a patient one on one was if there was very bad news or a form of a medical emergency that was discovered during the test. Think pre-natal ultrasound with no heartbeat- awful things to endure but I imagine they get used to it somehow.

The docs had some sub-specialties including interventional radiology you should consider looking into.
Very often you would not develop relationships with patients directly but you will be busy and wealthy once the medical school is paid off.

Best of luck- hope this helped.

Jason recommends the following next steps:

get a job or volunteer for a radiology department so you can physically see what it looks like

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Updated Translate

Jason’s Answer

Hello,

I am not a radiologist, however I worked in an office for many years when I was in college. First, you should consider doing that- clerical, billing, or anything you can do simply to get in the door. I learned an incredible amount of medical information while being there as well as the emotions that the staff and patients can experience.

Radiologists, at least when I worked where I did which was both in a hospital and private setting, sit in a dark room and use specific lighting to see as best they can when looking at films. With newer technology, this has likely changed but either way you work through reading films all day.
The only time I saw a radiologist interact with a patient one on one was if there was very bad news or a form of a medical emergency that was discovered during the test. Think pre-natal ultrasound with no heartbeat- awful things to endure but I imagine they get used to it somehow.

The docs had some sub-specialties including interventional radiology you should consider looking into.
Very often you would not develop relationships with patients directly but you will be busy and wealthy once the medical school is paid off.

Best of luck- hope this helped.

Jason recommends the following next steps:

get a job or volunteer for a radiology department so you can physically see what it looks like

0
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Richard’s Answer

Night call! Radiologists must provide emergency reads at all hours of the day and night; usually on a deadline. Emergency room doctors expect immediate and accurate results for their patients. In my group we take one week of night reading at a time. By the 7th night, I am exhausted and stressed out. Luckily there are 24 of us so it is almost 6 months until my next night shift.

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Sunil’s Answer

Probably the training to become a radiologist and then the thought that you're going to exposed to radiation or at least be in occasional proximity to radiation.

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Estelle’s Answer

My brother is a an interventional radiologist. He performs very challenging procedures, but he is very well trained and skillful. Taking call and being up working all night is probable the most physically challenging part of his job.

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