Skip to main content
2 answers
2
Asked 447 views

How long of an education will it take to become a Funeral Director?

I grew up seeing family members do #funeral work. I have a cousin who makes headstones and one who owns a funeral home. I'm not saying it looks fun, but it looks interesting! That makes me want to be the next generation of my family to own my own #Funeral home #business.

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

2

2 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Suzanne’s Answer

Hi Jasmine,

I see this line of work as being really important! I think our culture shys away from death and dying and has focused on being young, beautiful, healthy, and rich! Old people are put into homes or left to age on their own. Dying is out of the public eye and younger people don't seem to want to have to watch this process up close and personal. I have also recently experienced a cynical disrespect from many young people (e.g. not wearing face masks to prevent the spread of COVID19). This behavior makes me wonder this: do younger folks think that they will not age and want to experience life to the fullest as long as possible? It may be that schools need to instruct on the aging and dying process perhaps during the high school years.

I am a retired nurse and cared for cancer patients for my entire career. I cared for people from ages 18 to 100. I became quite comfortable with death and dying but those I cared for often were unable to fully cope. It sounds like you have had a positive experience by observing your family members. It is a healthy view to understand that life is not forever and that we all will face the same end at some point.

Here is some basic information on entry requirements: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/personal-care-and-service/funeral-service-occupations.htm

Here is a link to the American Board of Funeral Services Education: http://www.abfse.org/html/faq.html

More educational info: https://nfda.org/careers/schools-education

A really helpful article on what it is like to be a funeral director: https://www.cosmopolitan.com/career/a64099/things-i-wish-i-knew-funeral-director-career/

Understanding thanatology; the science of death and dying from multiple perspectives: https://www.verywellhealth.com/what-is-thanatology-3883024

It takes a kind and compassionate person to respectfully process the deceased body of a human being. This work also is about helping the remaining family and friends cope with their grief. I believe it is an honorable profession which needs people who will do the work ethically possessing the ability to not only run a solvent business, but doing so without harm to the grieving family.

I hope this information is helpful. Anecdotally, my own father worked part time at the local mortuary briefly. I remember only a few stories he told. He also was very comfortable with death and dying.

I hope you can read through all of the attached links and you find some helpful information.

Best,
Sue


0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Hector’s Answer

For a Funeral Director, like any other Management position that deals with the overall of a department, division, etc, you need first of all a good grip on how the funeral business works, then specifically be very clear about the work flow for the different aspects involved in the place on a daily basis. You need to know the products offered and their specs, to be able to deal with the clients, and be very clear about scheduling events and be aware that you will deal with people that will react different to the event of death. There are Directors that will also deal with scheduling the staff's shifts and very possibly be related to the staff's salaries etc.
Thank you comment icon Good information but doesn't exactly answer the student's question. How long would it take to become a director? Gurpreet Lally, Admin
0