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Do you have any advice on proper interviewing techniques?

What are some good questions to ask a potential employee to determine if they are a good match for the job? #business #management #manager #executive

Thank you comment icon Depends on the job. Research professional orgs in that field, they always have interview guides. Tricia Bailey

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Tony’s Answer

"What are some good questions to ask a potential employee to determine if they are a good match for the job?"


Naturally all interviews should be nuanced to the needs of the company and the role.


There is no better predictor of future behavior than past behavior and most importantly what they learned from that experience and how they would apply it to your company. I recommend behavioral interview questions (sample links below) as a good foundation for an interview. It can also be helpful to share challenges at your firm that the candidate will be facing or could have faced and how they would respond.


In some instances cases can be helpful as well. Give the candidate a case the simulates what they may see on the job and let them walk you through the results. Naturally with any creative interviewing ideas, make sure your HR is on-board.


Same behavioral interview questions:
https://www.themuse.com/advice/30-behavioral-interview-questions-you-should-be-ready-to-answer


Best of luck,

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PINKAL’s Answer

It's important to do some leg work prior to the interview so you can maximize your time you are putting in for the interview. Questions are important, but how you begin the session is also very important. Sometimes people may feel overwhelmed or distracted due to unorganized interview and may end up doing poorly in the interview. You should project positive and candid vibe from the beginning that you care.


Before going into the interview, make sure you have highlighted items in candidates resume that requires explanation. Start the interview by giving 5 minute explanation of your department's role in the company and your role in the department. then Segway into the job requirements and hit the high points of what is expected from the candidate. Then ask the candidate to do a quick walk through of his/her resume and ask to make connection with the requirements of the job. Ask them to explain how they are able, willing, and ready to take on the responsibilities. Once you have gone through their expertise and experience profile, go into behavioral questions-- what motivated you to apply for this position? why leaving another job? passion? working with others? how do they keep up with the trend in the market? etc. Be specific about next steps and give at least 5-10 minutes to ask you questions. Hope this helps.

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Greg’s Answer

Ask the candidates to explain how they have handled various situations. Real examples and not hypothetical are best. The candidate should answer outlining the situation, the action, and the result .

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Simeon’s Answer

Ask them their reasons for their interest in the position and see if there is any intrinsic motivation to do the work beyond the compensation. Also, ask them questions about how they get along with others, how they handled stressful situations, and what they look for in a work environment. See what real life examples they can give about themselves and if it matches the general descriptions of themselves that they give.
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Chayla’s Answer

All the answers provided thus far are great answers and all questions I would ask in an interview. I also find it helpful to ask candidates to provide a sample of their work in advance of the interview. For example, if I were hiring a computer programmer, I would ask them to provide me details of a short program that they built along with sample code used in the build of the program/application. Conversely, I may give them a short project and ask them to develop the code to create the program in advance of the meeting. I will sometimes ask the candidate to bring their most recent performance evaluation from their current/last job if it is available. If that both of these methods are helpful for getting a true appraisal of a person’s work ethic and capabilities.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Sheyenne,

Strategies and Probing Questions for Prospective Employee Interviews

The art of interviewing is pivotal in determining the aptness of prospective employees for a particular role. Here are some suggested strategies and probing questions to utilize during an interview:

Strategies for Interviewing:

Behavioral Interviewing: This strategy is centered around past behaviors and experiences as predictors of future performance. Pose open-ended questions like “Could you share an instance when…” or “Could you provide an example of…” to delve into the candidate's experiences and their handling of specific situations.

Structured Interviewing: This strategy employs uniform, pre-set questions for an objective evaluation of candidates. It aids in minimizing bias and ensures that all candidates are judged based on identical standards.

Competency-based Interviewing: This strategy is aimed at assessing candidates’ skills, knowledge, abilities, and other job-related factors (competencies). Pose questions related to the job's required competencies to ascertain if the candidate possesses them.

Use of Assessments: Utilize various assessments such as aptitude tests, personality tests, and skills assessments to gain a more rounded understanding of the candidate’s abilities and strengths.

Reference Checks: Reaching out to references offers valuable insights into a candidate’s work history, performance, and behavior in previous roles. Always ensure you have the candidate's permission before contacting their references.

Group Interviews: Carry out group interviews where multiple interviewers partake in the interview process to collect diverse perspectives and insights about the candidate’s abilities and fit within the organization.

Case Studies: Present real or hypothetical scenarios relevant to the job and ask candidates how they would tackle these problems or challenges. This aids in assessing their problem-solving skills, critical thinking abilities, and creativity.

Role Plays: Conduct role plays where candidates demonstrate their ability to perform specific tasks or functions required by the job under simulated conditions. This can offer valuable insights into their communication skills, adaptability, teamwork abilities, and other relevant competencies.

Trial Work Periods: Propose trial work periods where potential employees work on a project or assignment before being officially hired to evaluate their performance in a real-world setting and determine if they are a good fit for the job and organization culture.

Video Interviews: Use video interviews as part of your recruitment process to screen candidates remotely before inviting them for an in-person interview, saving time and resources for both parties involved in the hiring process.

Probing Questions for Prospective Employees: Here are some examples of probing questions you can ask during an interview:

Competency-based Questions: “Could you recount a time when you had to solve a complex problem at work? What steps did you take?” “Could you share about a project where you had to collaborate effectively with others?” “How do you manage conflicting priorities or deadlines?”

Behavioral Questions: “Could you describe your experience working under pressure?” “Could you provide an example of how you have exhibited leadership in your previous roles?” “Could you share an instance when you had to adapt swiftly to change?”

Open-ended Questions: “What drives you in your career?” “Why are you interested in this job?” “What intrigues you about our company?”

Job-specific Questions: “How well-acquainted are you with our industry/market/product/service?” “What do you know about our company culture?” “Could you describe your experience using [specific software/tool]?”

Hypothetical Scenarios: “If we were confronted with a significant challenge as a team, how would you approach it?” “How would you manage conflict within our team?”

Accuracy Probability: 95%

May God bless you!
JC.
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Amanda’s Answer

As an interviewer, it might be personal preference/organizational culture to do this, but I try my best to make it conversational. We have all been in the "hot seat" before and there's nothing worse than being grilled with questions. In my experience, I have found the following to work really well.
1. Introduce yourself and have your interview parter (if applicable) introduce themselves
2. Ask the candidate "Tell me about yourself"
3. Provide some background on the role you are interviewing for
4. Start off with a question about their previous behavior such as "Tell me about a time where you had to de-escalate a situation with a client. I'd love to hear about the situation, what you did, and what the outcome was."
5. You can ask more about this experience if you feel like you need to OR you can jump into another question but make the questions flow
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