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Once I'm out of college how do I find a job

#jobs #job-search #first-job #job-market

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Doc’s Answer

Grant when it comes to finding a job, nothing is more important than standing out. And I'm not talking standing out with a gimmicky resume or flashy interview outfit. I'm saying stand out the old-fashioned way – with more experience and better skills. There are three kinds of job hunters who graduate from college – those who wait until after they’ve graduated to look for a job, those who wait a couple of months to look for work and enjoy their last summer of freedom, and the smart ones, who start planning their job hunt even before their last set of finals. The reality is, that if you want to give yourself an edge on your first post-grad job hunt, you’ll need to start early.

GAIN WORK EXPERIENCE NOW – WHILE IN COLLEGE
The catch-22 of looking for a job after college is that even most entry-level positions are hiring for someone with experience. Many recent grads find themselves in the predicament of looking for their first job, only to learn that employers are looking for someone who has already worked in some capacity. Granted, this isn’t the case with all employers. Some employers still like to hire people who are very green. But most employers still prefer a college graduate who brings some sort of experience to the table. Your best bet is to work while you are in school, whether it’s an internship or a part-time job or summer job. Is it easy? No. Taking on a full load of courses and working at the same time 2009 (2)is not easy. But it is going to give you a major edge when you look for a job after graduation. The best-case scenario? You find a job related to your field and then get promoted once your degree is complete. Worst-case scenario? That doesn’t happen, but you still have experience on your resume when you graduate.

START LOOKING WORK NOW – BEFORE YOU GRADUATE
If you know what you want to do, you can start looking for a job in your field even before you graduate. Fortunately, there are endless ways to do this now, thanks to the internet. LinkedIn and other job search sites, one extremely effective way to get a job is to network. It’s much easier to get a job when you have a personal referral than to try and get in the door without one. And the earlier you start building your professional contacts, the better. This can actually also help give you an edge when looking for work. Start attending events related to your industry to meet people and expand your network. There are also other techniques you can use to start looking for work before you graduate. For example, January is a very busy time for recruiters as they look to fill new spots. It tends to slow down in the spring (Easter), and practically comes to a screeching halt in the summer (when everyone is on vacation). It’s it’s a good idea to start getting your feet wet during late winter/early spring of your last semester of college. Even if you don’t get hired right away, you can start building contacts – you may have a job waiting for you when you’re done.

NETWORK, NETWORK – START WITH YOUR ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
Personal referrals can go a long way when looking for a job, but they can be hard to build from scratch. Fortunately, your school already has a group of personal referrals ready to go – your alumni association. Most people like to help people. This is especially true if it’s people who went to the same college. When I worked in recruiting, there were definitely instances where young grads were practically hired on the spot just because they went to the same college as the hiring manager. Don’t underestimate the power of your alma mater, and start making some connections as soon as possible. Even if you can’t attend any alumni events yet, you can still find alumni on LinkedIn with their Alumni Tool. You may also want to consider volunteering to help during the events if you can’t yet join the association.

Good Luck Grant

Doc recommends the following next steps:

Once you have a good rough draft of your resume or CV, consider having a professional look at it. He or she will be able to help you polish and finalize it. Don’t forget that you will need to tailor your resume for each job you apply for. Basically, this means you need to edit or adjust and rearrange your content so that the most relevant information for the specific job you are applying for it easy to find.
Most students find a new job through someone they know – it’s true! Tap into the alumni network while you are still full of school spirit. One of the best ways to do that is through LinkedIn. It is easy to search people who have graduated from the same school as you. Then you can see what fields they work in and where they work. Narrow it down a bit and then reach out to those who may be able to help you. It’s all about who you know. Studies find that you're 10 times more likely to land a job when your application is accompanied by an employee referral. However, you can't get those coveted references without networking. Make it your mission to become an active networker.
LinkedIn is a brilliant tool for the job hunt. But unfortunately, many job seekers don’t know how to use it effectively. There is a lot more to LinkedIn than just copying and pasting your resume online. In fact, you have a lot more room on LinkedIn that should be used up. You also need to take into account keywords, LinkedIn groups, content creation and a whole lot of tools (like the Alumni Tool) that can make your job hunt more effective.
If you're having trouble breaking into your desired field, be willing to pursue an administrative or customer support role, or even an internship, to get your foot in the door. Many “entry-level” jobs today require one or more years of relevant experience. If you didn't intern during college to gain the prerequisite experience, you are at a disadvantage when competing for an entry-level job. Target internships that offer part-time hours or a flexible schedule so you can build up your resume with relevant experience and still have time to take on other work to pay the bills. It's a lot easier to land an entry-level job within your desired industry once you've gained some relevant internship experience and have begun to build a strong professional network in that field. Plus, internships can turn into full-time jobs if you play your cards right.
Thank you comment icon Thank You Hector. Hector “The broadest, and maybe the most meaningful definition of volunteering: Doing more than you have to because you want to, in a cause you consider good. ” – Ivan Scheier Doc Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the answer it was really helpful!! Grant
Thank you comment icon Your Welcome Grant. Believe you can and you’re halfway there. Doc Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank You Bryan. “At the end of the day it’s not about what you have or even what you’ve accomplished… it’s about who you’ve lifted up, who you’ve made better. It’s about what you’ve given back.” – Denzel Washington Doc Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank You Mike. “The meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away.” — William Shakespeare Doc Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank You Rob. “We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.” — Winston Churchill Doc Frick
Thank you comment icon Fantastic answer ! David Schnepper
Thank you comment icon Thank You Terence. “Remember that the happiest people are not those getting more, but those giving more.” ― H. Jackson Brown Jr. Doc Frick
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Deijana’s Answer

There are so many resources! Check with your college's career department. They usually post jobs where contact is known directly in the company to give you a recommendation and an interview. There are plenty of job boards like indeed, glassdoor, and snagjob. Or you can do it the old fashion way, ask yourself what job do you want? Research that position, the company, and the person that has that job, and take a look at the path they paved to get where they are. You can always go door to door to find places hiring, dressed professional,ly and having your resume on hand!
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Victoria’s Answer

LinkedIn is a great tool for job searching. Set up a profile with a photo, your education and work experience. Then connect with people you've worked or gone to school with, people you know from professional settings, etc. I like to connect with professional contacts within 24 hours of meeting them; that way you build a robust network. Set up LinkedIn job alerts in the area(s) you'd like to work and monitor daily (be sure to read email alerts so they come to you!) When you find a position that looks interesting, research the company's website and social media platforms. Use LinkedIn to see if you are connected with anyone who works or used to work there. Reach out to them to learn more about their experience - either over messenger or ask for a 15-20 min phone/video call. Even if they work(ed) in a completely different department, they should have a good understanding of the company culture and may have some insight into the role you're applying to. Be sure to send a thank you message to them within 24 hours after speaking. I also recommend asking people who have jobs you aspire to for informational interviews (20 mins via phone). Come prepared with questions (including what their career path was) and be sure to send a thank you afterward. It's a great way to learn more about the job - and build your network!
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Seda’s Answer

The journey starts while you are still at college. Build your network, try some internships, get sharp at some skills that resonates with you. Always stay open minded and do not take the failures personal, just keep in mind that luck is a big factor in job search. But no matter what always bring your best self to the interviews and be positive and engaging. Also, just keep in mind that in one day everything will change. The journey might feel long at times, but things change so fast. Finding your first job will be the hardest, the next job opportunities will come to you. Getting your step at your dream companies' doors is through building your network and your brand (background+skills+personality). Best of luck!
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Sheri’s Answer

A: Easy one is to track open roles on LinkedIn. Also if you are targeting specific companies regularly check their career sites. One that mostly worked for me is to send an open letter with what you are looking for to your network on LinkedIn (shares/like - gets it to the hiring managers or recruiters). Tap in to alumni and ensure you stand out with the accomplishments through out college years.
A: Try and network as much as possible.  Get yourself out there to events that are in your area.  One place that helped me in the past was meetup.com  They have hobbies/activities/business groups where people get together and discuss the specific topic.  Getting in touch with individuals who are already within the field can help greatly in finding a position that is open to help get your foot in the door.
Katie Campbell: As a recruiter for some of the Bay Area's top tech companies, I've worked with a lot of new grad looking for their first job. If you are currently in your Sophomore or Junior year of college, my recommendation would be to try and get summer internships before graduation. This will help give your practical work experience and help your background stand out when go to apply for full time roles. If you're already in your Senior year, be sure to attend your university's Career Fairs, which are largely being held online this year. Additionally, search for people on LinkedIn that have graduated from your same college and work at companies or in fields that you're interested in pursuing. Ask if they have some time to connect with you to give you career advice or can tell you more about their company! And lastly, apply to entry level roles online- LinkedIn is my recommended platform for applying. Make sure your LinkedIn is up to date and you have a professional photo! 

- Shuchi Batra, Besnik Madzar, Katie Campbell, John Burns
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Allison’s Answer

So much good advice in this thread!

Gaining work experience while you're in college is the most important thing you can do. I would also argue that it's extremely important to learn what you don't want to do. Eliminating things can be a really powerful way to discover where your interests actually lie. For example, if there are folks you can network with locally, you can talk to them about their jobs, what they like and dislike, and maybe find an opportunity to shadow them. Hearing from other folks about what they like and don't like about their jobs can give you some insight into opportunities you may want to seek out later.

Networking and relationship building are critical pieces to finding jobs throughout your career. Look for local volunteer opportunities, this is a great way to get connected to folks in a variety of careers and types of jobs. They can tell you about their journeys (people love to talk about themselves! and give advice!) and may be able to offer insight into next steps for you. Volunteering can lead to part time jobs, which can help lead you to internships or co-op experiences during college. Without pro-active undergrad working experience, I would have found it hard to start my career.

Allison recommends the following next steps:

Volunteer locally and participate in community outreach
Attend networking and community events (many are free!)
Try to build relationships with folks who may let you shadow them
Work part time in a number of different types of jobs to learn more about what you like / don't like
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Zonda’s Answer

Hi Grant,

You are in the best time to begin a job search - Right now! Be diligent while you are learning and increasing your skills. Join community volunteer organizations. Opportunities in these forums give you an opportunity to meet people from all walks of life and expertise. You are now networking and build relationships. You also gain 'free skillsets' as you learn to communicate, create and build (ex. homes, furniture), and understand how to lead and manage. Take part time jobs in any field you can. Again, these are transferable skills that will only build your attractiveness in the job market.

Also, attend sponsored networking meetings from corporations that are looking for young, eager minds to add to their company. Even if you are not yet ready to apply, you can learn of the company's culture, what they are looking for in candidates, and yes - pay scales.

Take advantage of every opportunity presented to you, as you never know where it may lead. You may even find a new interest or hobby - which can also lead to a wonderful and lucrative career.

Good luck!!!

Zonda recommends the following next steps:

Attend networking/corporation events.
Take part-time jobs (try several work types).
Volunteer and become active in the community.
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M’s Answer

Hi Grant! Great question, it can be difficult to know where to start. To add onto the other responses, I would highly recommend creating a linkedin profile and adding all your information to it. Also, LinkedIn also allows you to search for jobs based on location or job category. It would also be great to really utilize this platform and its resources to reach out to recruiters and setting up time with them to discuss any opportunities and just make connections. Hope this helped and wishing you the best of luck.
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Kruti’s Answer

Check with your schools guidance counselors, resume workshops, there’s a lot of resources in your school to help. Also put your profile on LinkedIn and search for jobs there.
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Apurva’s Answer

Hi! I think there's a lot of good advice on the mechanics of finding a job already on this thread , I would suggest this also. If there's not a "job" that is there specifically for exactly what you want then don't be afraid to create that position for yourself - be it your own business or for a company you admire.

Think outside the box and create the profile for yourself where you've stood out, gone the extra mile or dedicated time towards. People respond to passionate people and if you can show that - you will go far!

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Meighan’s Answer

The process begins now-not once you graduate. Start networking within your major. Get to know your Professors and explore opportunities through them, including working as an undergraduate Teaching Assistant. Don't discount volunteer opprotunties, such as helping with your major's outreach events. These could lead to other opportunities.

Join professional organizations in college, and get to know your fellow students. These are also good connections in your future job search, and many businesses look favorably on membership in professional organizations.

The next step should be your college's Internship and Career Center. They can help you develop your resume and Linked In Profile and assist as you apply for part time jobs and internships. Many majors grant credit for internships so its a win-win. You get credit toward your degree AND are building relationships with a firm/organization/corporation/business you may want to work for once you graduate.
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Taylor’s Answer

Hi there! I work in Human Resources at a global insurance company (i help recruit people into organizations) and can tell you that the job search process can begin during the time you are in college (not just after you graduate)!

Here's a few steps i would advise to you, based on my own experience at Vanderbilt University (I was a 2017 graduate).

Taylor recommends the following next steps:

Your sophomore year of college: Get connected with your college's Career Services department and ask for schedule of information sessions or career fairs (these usually happen in the fall for the most competitive companies)
Your junior year of college: apply for summer internships at companies which interest you. Make sure to have a resume created! Have professors, your parents, and as many people review it as possible.
Your senior year of college: leverage your experience at your internship to apply and interview at others for full time job, that has a start date post-graduation. Many top companies recruit for full-time positions during the fall & spring of your senior year, and this process (while can be daunting during the time of which you are in school) will be much worth it when you have a job lined up and waiting for you for the summer after you graduate.
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Blake’s Answer

Hey Grant,

Great question! The important thing is to start working on a job BEFORE you graduate from college. Some of the answers above are excellent! I would recommend going to your career fairs early, even if you aren't looking for a job. This will get you practice and exposure to interviews, etc. I would also recommend getting an internship. Most internships are meant to convert to full time employees. Hope this helps!

Thanks,
Blake
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Simeon’s Answer

Networking will be your most important way of finding a job. Reach out to people you know, both personally and from school. They will sometimes hear of job openings before they're ever posted to the job board. If these don't work, there are temp agencies that you can reach out to who can look for a job for you. They get a finders fee from the companies that hire you, I believe.
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Vic’s Answer

Utilize any and all resources:

1. Find positions that interest you and align with your strengths/values/personal & professional goals
2. Pick search engines, websites, career platforms to use and look for positions that you've identified as what you'd like on them
3. Apply, apply and apply | Make sure your resume is tailored to the positions you are applying to
4. Mock interviews | practice interviewing with behavioral questions
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