Skip to main content
9 answers
Asked Viewed 255 times Translate

What are some different careers or majors that I could pursue in Physics or engineering?

I really liked my physics class in high-school, and I am interested in engineering as well, but I am not sure how to move forward in that field. Any suggestions? physics engineering majors career college-major

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

11
100% of 10 Pros
100% of 1 Students

9 answers


Updated Translate

Brayden’s Answer

Hello Conner,
Engineering is quite broad so your have a ton of options in terms of what specific sector you want to pursue. The more broad engineering degrees are mechanical, chemical, electrical, civil and manufacturing. All vary in the type of work that they do. For example a mechanical engineer does a lot of problem solving for mechanical systems such as engines, hydraulic systems, thermal systems etc. A lot of a mechanical engineers jobs involves design building and testing of these systems. Chemical engineers focus on the safety of hazardous chemicals where they do a lot of preventative work to ensure that chemicals are transported and moved in a safe fashion. Overall each engineering discipline focuses on different topics put almost all engineers are problem solvers first. Many times they work in groups, bouncing ideas back and forth in order to come up with the best solution for the problem.
There are also more specific engineering degrees that focus specifically on one topic. For example there is biomedical, construction, environmental and aerospace. These are typically more specific to a certain line of work so the range of tasks that you are portentously exposed to is limited.
Whats very nice about engineering is for your first two years of schooling almost all of the engineering classes are the same so you could technically wait until your junior year (wouldn't advise) to decide what path you are wanting to take. Overall engineering is a great line of work for someone who loves science and math and problem solving. Hope this helps!
0
Updated Translate

Simeon’s Answer

Some different engineering degrees include chemical, civil, environmental, petroleum, mechanical, electrical, industrial, aerospace, and biological engineering. I'd recommend looking at the amount of time in college and tests I'd have to pass to make sure I was sure about it. It can be quite the long career path. If so, I'd recommend developing your math skills on your own. Get your hands on some old used textbooks and practice getting ahead on those skills. Along with that, there are some big certification tests that you could get ahead on studying for. Just five to ten flashcards a day will get you in a great start.
0
Updated Translate

Jeff’s Answer

Great question and I can relate. I loved Physics and Math in high school. I looked for engineering schools as a result but really did not know what type of engineering I would major in. First year students may get exposed to some ideas of the various fields with intro level classes as a specific area of interest at times may be declared second year. With your interest in Physics, if you pursue engineering, I would think about what parts of physics interest you. Then the engineering areas may be more clear:
* Mechanical Engineering - things with moving parts and stress come to mind. Bridges, tunnels, manufacturing, hydraulic components, commercial building HVAC design
* Electrical / Computer Engineering - anything wireless, semiconductors, computers, devices
* Software Engineering - building software (not as much specific physics involved here, but it could related)
* Chemical Engineering - not as much physics. More chemistry
* Material Science and Engineering - physics and chemistry from the atomic structure point of view


Careers can be vast across all segments of the economy. I know folks who studied engineering / physics that went into theoretical physics, applied physics, software, business development for tech companies, strategy for management consulting companies, finance, network engineering, wireless engineering, product management, sales.... to much to list.

My advice is that a degree in physics or engineering as a STEM education will open up doors across a wide variety of fields.
0
Updated Translate

Shawn’s Answer

You need to ask yourself which of the following descriptions matches you better.

Physicist principally develop/discover the science. To succeed as a physicist, you will probably need to have a PhD.

Engineers principally apply the science in the creation of something to help mankind in someway. To succeed as an engineer, you only need a BS. An MS would be more beneficial.

0
Updated Translate

Richard’s Answer

Engineering is a very broad field including, Electrical, Mechanical, BioMedical, Materials, Civil, Industrial, Computer Science, to mention a few. Early in your engineering classes you will take introductory course (including Physics) and from there you will be able to tell what your interest is. The good news is you are able to change, but it makes better sense to change earlier vs later. So take the time and pay attention to what you really enjoy those first few years. The opportunities in Engineering are plentiful.
0
Updated Translate

Leo’s Answer

There are so many different types of engineers. One of the answers posted has some great links to educate yourself on the many fields and what they focus on. It is a tough decision to narrow it further, but you don't have to get it exactly correct, and you shouldn't worry about finding that exact perfect role. It is very common for engineers to move from one field to another after the first or second year of college. The first year of school normally focuses on the core curriculum that will be needed for any engineering degree. It may mix in a few specific classes that will help you determine if that specific type of engineering discipline is what you thought it would be. You will have access to professors that can assist as well. I can tell you that even after you get your degree in a specific engineering discipline, you are not locked into that field. I work for a large telecom company and we regularly hire engineers for the discipline they have demonstrated in getting their degree as well as the technical capability to learn complex ideas and solutions. We have industrial engineers who are very successful and growing their careers that hold a position that you might think would only be reserved for an electrical engineer. So obviously you want to align your education as closely as you can with your career goals, but you will have a couple of opportunities to shift your focus if you just decide it isn't right for you.
0
Updated Translate

Jeremy’s Answer

The career I found very rewarding was Geophysical Engineering.

I’d recommend looking at Colorado School of Mines outside Denver. It has over 10 engineering degrees. Th

Jeremy recommends the following next steps:

efirst year and a half has similar courses for all, and you can feel your way into which engineering profession fits best
0
Updated Translate

Wellington’s Answer

As a bridge engineer i have found my profession to be very rewarding. The work I do impacts the people in my local communities. It also provides me with a sense of satisfaction knowing that the things i design will be in use for decades to come. If this is something that interests you then i would suggest looking at colleges that offer civil engineering degrees, specifically with an emphasis in structural engineering. Obviously pick something that your passionate about and you cant go wrong no matter what type of engineering you pick.
0
Updated Translate

Nattakarn’s Answer

Hello, Connor

I have provided the link to the Website for the Bureau of Labor Statistics which has a great information for each engineering field, Physicists and Astronomers . You will be able to find the Job Summary, Pay scale, Work Environment, etc. from this website to help you determine which engineering field would fit you better. Please check out the link below for more details. You can also search for other career fields as well.

Physicists and Astronomers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/physicists-and-astronomers.htm

Architecture and Engineering Occupations
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/home.htm

Mechanical Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/mechanical-engineers.htm

Civil Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/civil-engineers.htm

Aerospace Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/aerospace-engineers.htm

Architecture and Engineering Occupations
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/home.htm

Industrial Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/industrial-engineers.htm

Environmental Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/and-engineering/environmental-engineers.htm

Agricultural Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/agricultural-engineers.htm

Electrical and Electronics Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/electrical-and-electronics-engineers.htm

Petroleum Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/petroleum-engineers.htm

Nuclear Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/nuclear-engineers.htm

Bioengineers and Biomedical Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/biomedical-engineers.htm

Computer Hardware Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/computer-hardware-engineers.htm

Chemical Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/chemical-engineers.htm

Health and Safety Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/health-and-safety-engineers.htm


Materials Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/materials-engineers.htm

Electrical Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes172071.htm

Electrical and Electronics Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/electrical-and-electronics-engineers.htm

I have provided the link to the Website for the Bureau of Labor Statistics which has a great information for each engineering field. You will be able to find the Job Summary, Payscale, Work Environment, etc. from this website to help you determine which engineering field would fit you better. Please check out the link below for more details. You can also search for other career fields as well.

Architecture and Engineering Occupations
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/home.htm

Mechanical Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/mechanical-engineers.htm

Civil Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/civil-engineers.htm

Aerospace Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/aerospace-engineers.htm

Architecture and Engineering Occupations
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/home.htm

Industrial Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/industrial-engineers.htm

Environmental Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/and-engineering/environmental-engineers.htm

Agricultural Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/agricultural-engineers.htm

Electrical and Electronics Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/electrical-and-electronics-engineers.htm

Petroleum Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/petroleum-engineers.htm

Nuclear Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/nuclear-engineers.htm

Bioengineers and Biomedical Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/biomedical-engineers.htm

Computer Hardware Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/computer-hardware-engineers.htm

Chemical Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/chemical-engineers.htm

Health and Safety Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/health-and-safety-engineers.htm


Materials Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/materials-engineers.htm

Electrical Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes172071.htm

Electrical and Electronics Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/electrical-and-electronics-engineers.htm
I have provided the link to the Website for the Bureau of Labor Statistics which has a great information for each engineering field. You will be able to find the Job Summary, Payscale, Work Environment, etc. from this website to help you determine which engineering field would fit you better. Please check out the link below for more details. You can also search for other career fields as well.

Architecture and Engineering Occupations
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/home.htm

Mechanical Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/mechanical-engineers.htm

Civil Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/civil-engineers.htm

Aerospace Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/aerospace-engineers.htm

Architecture and Engineering Occupations
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/home.htm

Industrial Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/industrial-engineers.htm

Environmental Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/and-engineering/environmental-engineers.htm

Agricultural Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/agricultural-engineers.htm

Electrical and Electronics Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/electrical-and-electronics-engineers.htm

Petroleum Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/petroleum-engineers.htm

Nuclear Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/nuclear-engineers.htm

Bioengineers and Biomedical Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/biomedical-engineers.htm

Computer Hardware Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/computer-hardware-engineers.htm

Chemical Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/chemical-engineers.htm

Health and Safety Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/health-and-safety-engineers.htm


Materials Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/materials-engineers.htm

Electrical Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes172071.htm

Electrical and Electronics Engineers
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/electrical-and-electronics-engineers.htm
0