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What are the best classes to take to become a lawyer?

I am a middle school student who took a test that said being a lawyer would be a good job for me. #school #students #lawyer #lawyers #lawyers

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Subject: Career question for you

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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear JWILLY,

Kick-Off

Kudos to you for considering law as your future profession! The journey to becoming a lawyer demands commitment, relentless effort, and a fervent desire for justice. This write-up will provide you with a comprehensive guide on the most effective ways to become a lawyer, encompassing the educational prerequisites, indispensable skills, and pragmatic steps to follow.

Educational Prerequisites

The first step towards becoming a lawyer is to earn a bachelor's degree. Although there's no mandatory major, it's crucial to opt for courses that hone your critical thinking, research, and communication abilities. Prospective lawyers often major in political science, history, philosophy, or English. Upon completion of your undergraduate studies, you'll need to pursue law school, which generally spans three years. Here, you'll delve into various law sectors, including contracts, torts, criminal law, and constitutional law.

Indispensable Skills

To thrive as a lawyer, you'll need to master several crucial skills, such as:

Effective Communication: Lawyers need to articulate their thoughts clearly to clients, judges, and other legal professionals, both in writing and verbally.
Analytical Thinking: Lawyers must be adept at dissecting complex information and scenarios swiftly and accurately to provide optimal advice and representation to their clients.
Research Proficiency: Lawyers should be proficient in research, capable of finding pertinent legal resources promptly and efficiently.
Detail-Oriented: Lawyers often handle vast amounts of intricate information. A sharp eye for detail is key to spotting vital facts and formulating precise legal arguments.
Persuasiveness: Lawyers should be convincing when presenting their cases and advocating for their clients.
Pragmatic Steps

Once you've completed your legal education, follow these steps to become a licensed attorney:

Clear the bar exam: Each state has its own bar exam, which assesses your understanding of state-specific laws. Clearing the bar exam is mandatory to practice law in that state.
Gain Experience: Acquiring hands-on experience through internships, clerkships, or working at a law firm will help you cultivate crucial skills and establish a professional network.
Consider Specialization: Many lawyers choose to specialize in particular law fields, like corporate law, criminal defense, or intellectual property. Specialization can lead to more concentrated expertise and increased income potential.
Continuing Education: Lawyers need to stay abreast of changes in the law and advancements in their field. Many states mandate lawyers to engage in continuing legal education programs to retain their licenses.
Wrap-Up

Becoming a lawyer is within your reach if you possess a zeal for justice and are ready to invest the necessary hard work. Concentrate on enhancing your critical thinking, research, and communication skills during your undergraduate studies. Enroll in a reputable law school, clear the bar exam, accumulate practical experience, consider specializing in a law field, and engage in continuing education programs to stay updated with legal changes. With determination and persistence, you can realize your aspiration of becoming a successful lawyer.

Authoritative Reference Titles
Law.com - Provided insightful information on the educational prerequisites and pragmatic steps to become a lawyer.
American Bar Association - Shared vital details about the skills future lawyers need and advice on selecting the right undergraduate major.
FindLaw - Provided in-depth descriptions of the various steps to become a licensed attorney, such as clearing the bar exam and accumulating practical experience.

GOD BLESS!
James Constantine Frangos.
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Jorie’s Answer

Unfortunately, in middle school and high school, you do not tend to have a lot of choice in what classes you take, but if your school offers any courses related to politics/political science, philosophy, or economics/business, those can all be helpful courses later on. Of course, if your school has law related classes, those would be beneficial, but I'm not aware of many middle schools or high schools that offer those types of classes. Also, if your school has mock trial competitions, a debate team, or student government those may also be good extracurricular activities. You'll have more options in college to take law related classes if this ends up being something you want to pursue.
Thank you comment icon Appreciated your answer Jorie Folasade Oluwabamiwo
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Sue’s Answer

To add to what Jorie and Folasade said, you may want to consider taking courses in history and government to give you a broad understanding of what influences our society. Cultivate your communication and reasoning skills and a strong work ethic. Mathematics helps to teach problem solving skills, which will be useful in different aspects of law. I encourage you to learn about different legal jobs or careers. That could help you decide if you really want to be a lawyer or perhaps work in the legal field, but in a different position, such as a paralegal.

Select a college major that you enjoy and excel at. Study hard for the LSAT or GRE to earn the highest score as you will need one of these exam scores, depending on the law school to be admitted.

Talk to someone who is a lawyer. Is it possible to spend a day with them to get a sense of what they do?

Good luck.

Sue
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Folasade’s Answer

I agree with Jorie's answer and will add that you get engaged in public speaking as much as possible to increase your communication skills and boldness. Most law schools require a bachelor's degree for admittance. However there is no specific degree or set of courses required for admission, Nonetheless some courses stated by Jolie can be helpful.
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