Skip to main content
5 answers
Asked Viewed 615 times Translate

How much money and time does an aspiring pediatrician spend throughout his/her education?

I was wondering how expensive this path is and how many years it would take. medicine pediatrics pediatrician medical-school

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

5
Pros
5
0

5 answers


Updated Translate

Dumi’s Answer

This number can vary from $0-$600,000 depending on financial aid, scholarships, loans, and parental support. It also depends on the cost of tuition (which schools you choose to attend). There isn't one great answer. The cheapest path is to start by taking community college courses in high school. Then complete a two year degree in community college as soon as possible. Complete your last two years for a bachelors at the cheapest school you can find, while maintaining good grades and GPA. Take the MCAT exam (by as cheap a process as possible). Score well on the MCAT. Finally apply and attend the cheapest Medical school you can find. This process might take you all over the country but it will be as cost effective as possible. You have to do a lot of research on the cost of the schools you want to attend and determine how you will pay for them.


In my personal opinion. The cost is very important, but you want to find the environment that is best for you. That place won't always be the cheapest option.

0
Updated Translate

Richard’s Answer

If you can keep your expenses down (live with parents, attend community college which can be free in some cities, complete your degree at an inexpensive public institution etc) debt doesn't have to be out of control. However the typical student does not do everything they can to decrease expenses then has to be stressed during their first years of practice.

Another unfortunate consequence of debt is limiting the student's choices after graduation. If a student has a passion for pediatrics, but crippling debt, they may be forced to apply to residencies with higher future earning potential.

A typical experience would be to complete residency and become an employee of a group. You aren't able to pay down your debt much because you are saving to become a partner. You buy into the group and then start making partnership money. That's when you are able to really tackle that debt.


But typically you are looking at 10-15 years to pay back your student debt.

On a side note, watch this video which compares a UPS driver to a physician. It makes a lot of assumptions about debt and saving/investment, but concludes that the average primary care physician doesn't become financially better off than a driver until age 53.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2503XQU1feE\
0
Updated Translate

Estelle’s Answer

Average medical school debt in the United States is $232,000, and everyone has given good advice so far. I would just l like to add that college is usually 4 years and medical school is 4 years. Residency is 3-6 years, but you do receive a salary during these years, as you are a practicing physician even though you are still in training.
0
Updated Translate

Rachel’s Answer

With regard to the academic preparation for pediatrics, you should be prepared for a lot of school. This means that you will have to complete college with a bachelor’s degree (4 years) as well as all of the Pre-med requirements. GPA should probably be 3.8 or better. You will also have to score well on the MCAT. Once accepted to medical school, as long as you pass your classes and perform reasonably well during your four years of medical training, you can apply for a pediatrics 3-year residency. You are looking at 11 years of school after high school, but potentially a very fulfilling life-long career.

If you pay for medical school yourself, you are looking at $200,000+ of student loan debt.
0
Updated Translate

Jamie’s Answer

This is not an easy answer. You spend a lot of time in school and studying. During medical school I would study 8-10 hours daily. In residency you typically work 12 hour shifts and still need to put in an hour or 2 of studying daily. You typically work 6 days a week also with only 2 weeks of vacation annually. When you go into practice it depends on how you want to practice. If you want to be a hospitalist they often work 12-24 hour shifts 2-3 weeks per month. In private practice you can work anywhere from part time at 1-3 days a week to full time at 4-7 days per week. Most practices do have weekend hours.
Now money wise that is not a straightforward answer either. It depends on how expensive your undergraduate and medical school are and what type of scholarships you get. It is not uncommon for people to graduate with 200-300 k in student loans.
0