Skip to main content
4 answers
4
Asked 1552 views

What can I do for liberal arts?

I am in college right now and I have no idea what I want to do, I heard this major they offer called liberal arts, it sounds interesting but I have no idea what careers are out there for liberal arts.
#art #english #arts #studies #liberal

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

4

4 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Ellen’s Answer

Well, it used to be (say 20 years ago when I was in college) that all college majors were in the liberal arts, but now with colleges and universities offering more undergraduate professional degrees, that seems to have gone by the wayside. (The Liberal Arts originated in European universities in the Middle Ages and were made up of a specific set of areas of study.)


The purpose of a liberal arts degree, with a major in a specialized area such as history, English, science, art, foreign languages, economics, and so on, was NOT to get you a job, but to educate you--to expose you to different subject areas and different ideas (this is where the liberal comes in), to encourage you to be open-minded yet critical in your thinking (weigh the pros and cons of any situation), and to be able to express yourself clearly in writing and in speaking. You would choose a major, an area you were interested in and where you would concentrate your studies, but many colleges and universities often have requirements in addition that you take classes in other fields to round out your education.


When I was in college, my major was in Art History, but for my B A (Bachelor of Arts), I was also required to also take classes in a foreign language, the Humanities (combo of history and literature), and science. Employers used to value (and I think they still do) a liberal arts education in that they could hire flexible open-minded individuals, who could think critically, who had with a broad knowledge of basic areas of studies and a more specialized knowledge of a subject (their major).


So, if you are not sure of what you want to do, looking at the liberal arts and choosing a major might be the way forward. Think about your interests and your passions. I loved art, so a major in Art History was my choice, and a wonderful one; I have continued to learn about art my whole life. I also do studio art, and so a career as an art teacher was the result. But, while in college, though I knew my future would be somewhere in the art field, I did not start our college thinking I would be an at teacher. With my BA and art history major, I could have gone into any number of fields, such as, architecture, interior design, publishing, museums, travel, fashion or pursuing a graduate degree in art history. Keep in mind that with a liberal arts degree, often you will need a graduate degree for further study to land a job in certain professions--teaching at any level, law, medicine, architecture, and so on. My BA was in art history, so I had to get a MS in art education in order to get a job teaching art.


If you have an personal advisor at school, talk to him or her, or if you have a career counseling program at your school, visit there. Don't wait for your senior year in college to get career counseling. Career counseling can help you to focus your interests, which in turn, could help you focus your idea of a major.

1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Craig’s Answer

Liberal Arts is a series of courses that cover many areas such as English, history, art, theatre, the humanities, etc. It's offered by many colleges, especially for those students that do not know what they want to do after they graduate. I took liberal arts and ended up taking every art class they offered because I found I really enjoyed doing and learning about art. I graduated with a BA in English and a minor in art. I then decided to go back to undergraduate school to take more art classes in order to get enough credits to apply for graduate school. I was accepted and received an MFA in painting. Once you find something you love, your passion, life becomes more clear cut. Lastly if you decide on a specific field and get the necessary degrees, you may not find a job in that field. However you still have that passion and no matter what your job is, you can always make time to pursue your dreams.

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Estelle’s Answer

My son has a degree in liberal arts and then went on to go to medical school. Sometimes, you will require additional training or education to find a career with a liberal arts degree.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Roberta’s Answer

Hi there-


It depends on what courses your college has identified as liberal arts. CollegeRanker.com (http://www.collegeranker.com/liberal-arts-degree-jobs/) proves the liberal arts field covers a lot of territory and here are the Top Highest Paying Liberal Arts Degree Jobs:




  1. Economist
    Of the liberal arts disciplines, the field with the most potential for compensation close to the better paid professions like finance, law, medicine, or technology, Economics is the highest performer. Graduates with an undergraduate degree in the subject will find hiring on the traditional job market easier. Economics majors have opportunity for advancement in corporate, government, or nonprofit accounting, finance, sales and analyst functions. Graduate degree holders in economics, generally find the same opportunities for hire as a Master of Business Administration. Economists with a PhD are also highly valued in the policy and research fields, and as consultants to the insurance and legal fields where econometric modeling is required to evaluate liability. Annual salary: $40,000 to $200,000.




  2. Archeologist
    Qualifications as an Archaeologist represent a unique set of skills, making demand high for professionals with geological and traditional archeological training. Scientific testing of archeological sites is critical to the commission of energy projects, as well as land developer compliance audit with environmental and soil regulations in instances of burial ground or other substantial archeological site. Forensic archeologists conduct the recovery, testing and cataloging of artifacts and human remains for storage or transport. Traditional archeologists may also work on behalf of a museum or university in the reconstruction of a history of a people or environmental event. Professional archaeologists require a graduate degree to advance as professionals. Annual salary: $40,000 to $171,000.




  3. Sociologist
    The study of social groups, their cultures, institutions, and organizations is the provenance of the Sociologist. The field is acknowledged as a Renaissance discipline, so that when sociologists conduct research ethnographies, they may examine the origins, behaviors and interactions of a social group for in-depth analysis of economic, political or religious insights. Sociological research often contributes to social policy formation. The dual focus on qualitative and quantitative or statistical analysis in the discipline, makes this sociology good preparation for a role as a faculty, or in service to government or nonprofit agencies, as well as market research. Annual salary: $55,000 to $97,000.




  4. Psychologist
    Liberal arts training in psychology is offered a most university institutions at the PhD level. Psychologists may also be employed as faculty or professional researchers engaged in studying behavioral patterns, through testing, procedures and analysis of scientific outcomes toward development of evidence based practice models of treatment. Professionals desiring to work as licensed counselors, clinical, or research psychologists must complete a graduate degree in the subject. Annual salary: $67,000 to $90,000.




  5. Public Relations Specialist
    Responsible for the brand identity or celebrity of a clients, Public Relations Specialists work on behalf of a corporation or public figure in coordination with reporters to increase visibility and performance of a communications strategy. Critical to the sustained confidence of investor support Public Relations Specialists, promote a client’s image by way of multi-scale marketing strategies and professional public relations campaigns. Public Relations Specialist require Bachelor of Arts degree in advertising, communications, journalism, or public relations. Those desiring managerial positions should pursue a graduate degree. Annual salary: $ 40,000 to $73,000.




  6. Human Resources Specialists
    Organizational performance begins with human assets. The innovation of human resource management (HRM) systems approaches to the recruitment, training, motivation, and retention of company’s top talent requires sophisticated training in the field of Human Resources. A degree in human resources also prepares a candidate for leadership in an organization. Working in coordination with executive management, Human Resource Directors are responsible for the development of strategic compensation and benefit plans, procedures, policies, and training. Human resources specialists require a Bachelor of Arts or Master of Arts degree in human resources, or related field such as business administration, labor relations, personnel administration, or behavioral sciences. Annual salary: $42,000 to $72,000.




  7. Graphic Designer or Artist
    The commercial demand for Graphic Design has expanded the opportunity for students graduating from Graphic Arts degree programs. Engaged in the design, analysis, and production of visual images for advertising, marketing, products and services collateral, Graphic Designers and Artists use software applications or hand drawn sketches for a range of promotional materials and other aesthetic purposes. Animation, illustration, photographs, prints, and text incorporation of images created by Graphic Designers and Artists add value to any publication. Professionals entering the job market from an undergraduate degree program will find a variety of opportunities available, including digital game design. Graduates with a degree will have more opportunity as executives in related fields such as museum curatorial. Annual salary: $33,000 to $65,000.




  8. Writer
    Preparation of manuscripts, articles, books, and stories, for journals, magazines, newspapers, radio, television, and we content by professional writers illustrates the breadth of expertise in information and knowledge development that English majors and other liberal arts scholars offer. Some writers work as reporters, conducting research, holding interviews, report facts, and develop concepts for application of findings. Writers may also generate content for advertisements, websites and a host of other new media channels of information. Technical writers are in hot demand, writing for scientific and technology organizations in the creation of instructional manuals. Master of Fine Arts, and those with a degree in Communications, Journalism will be the most sought after. Annual salary: $57,000 to $65,000.




  9. Social Worker
    The front line case managers locating resources to help individuals, families or groups of people to access assistance programs, counseling, career training, housing, or substance abuse treatment, Social Workers have an important obligation to clients. Social Workers require a Bachelor degree. Graduates with a Master degree in human services, psychology, or sociology and National Association of Social Workers certification are qualified for managerial roles in the field. Annual salary: $37,000 to $56,000.




  10. Teacher
    Education in the arts, language, sciences, and social sciences is required for a professional career as a teacher. Liberal arts programs offer teachers in training the knowledge they require to pass subject matter exams. Teaching requires a Bachelor degree. Graduate level teachers candidates receive higher compensation due to institutional ranking. Annual salary: $47,000 to $52,000.



0