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I like computer drafting and architecture. I would like a 2 year degree. Would I have a disadvantage over someone with a four or five year degree?

People are telling me a master's degree is better than an associate's. #or #someone #with #year #either #five #two #architecture #computer-aided-drafting #drafting #architecture-and-planning #architect #career

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Paul’s Answer

Yes, competition is keen - get a BS in architecture or better yet, MA or MS - the 2 year degree is a great start toward an architect or engineering degree and learning CAD.
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Deborah’s Answer

Considering the current market, you could be very successful learning programs like Revit, or advanced 3D programs to support architecture or engineering work.
This type of expertise allows you to work as employee in a company or as consultant.
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Elaine’s Answer

It is really about experiences. Depend on what your goal is as well. If you want to become an architect, 4 years degree most likely will be more beneficial than 2 years. If you like drafting and 3D renderings, 2 years degree should be fine. Most of the company like to have someone who has experiences and full knowledge on the software. Revit and 3DMax, google sketch as well as AutoCad still a hot pick.
Good Luck and hope it helps!
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Matt’s Answer

A two year degree would give you software skills that you could sell to a firm. Then you could decide if the extra money and time for a Bachelor's degree (and potentially a Masters degree) is the direction that you want to follow. If you know that you want to be a registered architect I would forgo the associates degree and go with the bachelors degree.

I will say that in Texas many architecture firms are moving away from draftsmen with associate's degrees in favor of those with bachelor's and masters degrees that can eventually become registered architects. That may be different in your area of the country.

Structural and civil engineers still use draftsmen and designers (both positions require 2 year associates degrees) so that could be another option.
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