6 answers

How much studying and homework do you do on an average day as a pre-med student?

7
100% of 6 Pros
100% of 1 Students
Updated Viewed 564 times Translate

I'm planning to go into Pre-Med in college. I know it's going to be a very vigorous four years, but want to know exactly how difficult it will be to take all the classes in the Pre-Med track. #pre-med #undergraduate #college-student #pre-medicine #medicine #healthcare #hospital-and-health-care

7
100% of 6 Pros
100% of 1 Students

6 answers

Yasemin’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Hi Yuki! I agree with previous answers; I think it also matters about your class load. So if you are taking 5-6 courses you will be devoting more time than 3-4 classes. Some of my classmates and myself included would take about 5 courses per semester with general education classes as well, so it was a lot of time planning out what to study and committing. Every day after class I would definitely study and do the required readings and take notes. I think every day you should be devoting about 4-5 hours to study for your classes, maybe six if you have more time and less obligations like a part time job. I would work on the weekends so I would mostly study in the morning for about 5 hours and the campus jobs I had would also provide me the opportunity to work and also study at the same time since it was more feasible in terms of responsibilities. I also had classmates who would be taking more complex courses at times and had other responsibilities, so for the semester they would only take 3 science courses and one gen. ed.; 4 courses which would allow them space out their time more. In all, it really matters about how well you understand the topics, the difficulty of the courses, your own time management and responsibilities as well. If you have classmates who study more that is beneficial of course but remember to also not stress if your times of studying may be different. For example, the day before my final for General Chemistry, my classmates were pulling all nighters in the library while I had to go to work. However, knowing this I had started studying two weeks in advance and preparing in time! In conclusion, I would recommend to always study and find time to always put your classes first because they are difficult and your GPA will most definitely be one of the largest factors when applying to medical school, so be sure to put school first!

Best of luck!
0

Kayla’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
The average pre-reqs include 2 semesters of inorganic chemistry, 2 semesters of organic chemistry, 1 semester of biochemistry, 2 semesters of biology, 2 semesters of physics, 2 semesters of English, 1 semester of statistics, and at least 2 semesters of social sciences. Prepare to take 2-3 of these classes per semester. These classes are difficult but not impossible. Plan on studying 15-20 hours a week for these classes alone, in addition to your elective classes (depending on your major and university, you will take 4 to 5 classes per semester). Some courses will require more, some less. Personally, I found statistics easier (so I only put about 2 hours a week into it), but I found organic chemistry harder (so I put 8-10 hours a week into it).
0

Erin’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
I think the amount of homework will vary depending on the number of classes you take. Also, if you are very good at science classes, you may find it not too difficult! It all depends honestly. I was initially premed and then changed my major b/c I was making c's and after a hard try I realized I would not get into med school, so I switched to the business school. In my experience, we have to jump in feet first, do our very best, and if it does not work, go to plan B. If it does work - you will be a MD! I wish you the best!
0

Estelle’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
That's highly variable. Everybody learns differently. Some kids did very little regular studying and crammed the night before the test, and some studied for several hours every day.
One rule of thumb is to dedicate 3 hours of studying per week for each credit hour. A 3 hour class will require 9 hours studying outside the classroom.
0

Rachel’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
I spent about 8-10 hours per day in class or studying. Wake up at 7, work out, be ready to start studying by 8 or 9. Eat lunch in the library while reading notes or listening to lectures online. I would study until dinner and then sometimes study that night if I hadn't finished preparing for the next day's classes.
0

Richard’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Plan to spend 2 hours studying for every hour of lecture.
0