Skip to main content
9 answers
9
Asked 1323 views

What are the downfalls of majoring in Computer Science/Computer Technology if you ultimately want to work in the cyber security field?

I am interested in pursuing a career in cyber security, but some schools I am interested in do not offer cyber security as a major. #computer-science #information-technology #cyber-security

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

9

9 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Tatyanna,

**The Need for a Stronger Emphasis on Cyber Security**

While a degree in Computer Science or Computer Technology can equip you with a robust understanding of programming, algorithms, and data structures, it may not delve deeply into the principles and practices of cyber security. This gap in knowledge could put you at a disadvantage when vying for roles in the cyber security field.

**The Challenge of Insufficient Practical Experience**

Certain Computer Science or Computer Technology courses may not offer the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in cyber security. This lack could pose a challenge when you attempt to apply theoretical knowledge to real-world cyber security issues.

**The Issue of Outdated Course Content**

The curriculum for Computer Science and Computer Technology programs may not always be updated to reflect the latest developments in cyber security. This could result in learning obsolete concepts and techniques that are no longer applicable in the fast-paced cyber security sector.

**The Shortfall in Cyber Security Topic Coverage**

A degree in Computer Science or Computer Technology may not encompass all the crucial aspects of cyber security. For example, you may not be educated about specific cyber threats, security policies, or incident response strategies, which could hinder your effectiveness in a cyber security role.

**The Problem of Limited Familiarity with Cyber Security Tools and Technologies**

Programs in Computer Science and Computer Technology may not introduce you to the most recent tools and technologies utilized in cyber security. Consequently, you might find it difficult to adapt to the tools and technologies prevalent in the industry when you begin working in a cyber security role.

**Strategies to Overcome These Challenges:**

1. Think about pursuing a minor in Cyber Security or selecting relevant elective courses to broaden your knowledge.
2. Look for internships or co-op opportunities that offer practical experience in cyber security.
3. Engage in cyber security competitions or hackathons to gain hands-on experience and enhance your skills.
4. Keep abreast of the latest trends and developments in cyber security by perusing industry publications and attending conferences.
5. Consider acquiring relevant certifications such as the Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) or Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) to showcase your expertise and dedication to the field.
6. Utilize online resources like Coursera, Udemy, and Pluralsight to learn about specific cyber security topics and tools that may not be included in your degree program.
7. Join professional organizations like (ISC)² or ISACA to network with industry professionals and stay updated on the latest trends and best practices in cyber security.
8. Think about attending workshops, seminars, or webinars offered by industry vendors or solution providers to learn about their products and solutions.
9. Seek opportunities to collaborate with other professionals or students who are knowledgeable in cyber security to gain practical experience and enhance your skills.
10. Develop a solid foundation in programming, algorithms, and data structures through your Computer Science or Computer Technology degree program, which will be crucial for many cyber security roles.
11. Be ready to continue learning and adapting throughout your career as new threats and technologies emerge in the cyber security field.

**Recommended Reading:**

1. **Cybersecurity: Apex Predators, Prey, and Ecosystems** by Dr. Richard Ford, Dr. Glenn Sager, Dr. Lorrie Cranor, Dr. Rachel Keller, Dr. Adam Jaffe, Dr. Susan Landau, Dr. Ari Juels, Dr. Anna Lysyanskaya, Dr. Gene Spafford, Dr. Bruce Schneier, Dr. Carl Landwehr, Dr. Fred Schneider, Dr. David Wagner, Dr. Matt Blaze, Dr. Whitfield Diffie, Dr. Susan Hornbeck, Dr Haining Wang, Dr Mihoko Matsubara, Dr Robert Cunningham , Dr Stefan Axelsson , Dr Vincent Cunningham , Dr Yan Chen , Dr Yvo Desmedt , Prof Andrew Sellars , Prof Cormac Herley , Prof Dan Wallach , Prof David Patterson , Prof Douglas Schmidt , Prof Fredrik Bengtsson , Prof John Mitchell , Prof Jonathan Smith , Prof Kiron Skinner , Prof Lydia Kostopoulos , Prof Markus Duft , Prof Matthew Blaze , Prof Ninghui Li , Prof Paul Syverson , Prof Radu State , Prof Raluca Ada Popa , Prof Robert Ellis Smith Jr , Prof Scott Coulling , Prof Shamik Sural . 2021.[^cybersecurity-apex-predators]

2. **Cybersecurity: The Beginner's Guide** by Raef Meeuwisse.[^cybersecurity-beginners-guide] 2017.[^cybersecurity-beginners-guide]
3. **Information Security: Principles and Practice** by Mark Stanislav and Jerod Brennen.[^information-security] 2019.[^information-security]

May God bless you!
James Constantine.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jim’s Answer

The issues I would focus on would be getting too specific in your training in CS/CT (e.g. specific programming language) or the timeframe of a specific topic isn't as broad as what you would be exposed to in the private sector, cyber security world.  For example, you only get exposure to Unix or Windows or Mac, but no exposure to Mainframes.  Cyber Security has a very broad set of domains and technology elements and you should research which ones you are most passionate about.   Make sure your CS/CT classes cover a wide variety of technology and eras.

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Miguel’s Answer

Hi Tatyanna,

I don't foresee any downfalls pursuing a CS degree. You would still be able to transition into the cyber security field. The CS degree may be a bit developer heavy so that is something to note. Unless your scripting we don't use programming languages often. A CISSP certification would be beneficial after 2 years of experience to establish a foundational knowledge base.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jim’s Answer

A computer science degree develops the knowledge and skills to design, develop and test computers. This is a great foundation to start if you want to be in the cyber security field. There are any number of jobs you could get from this degree to include an information security analyst.

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Chitra’s Answer

There is downfalls of majoring in Computer Science/Computer Technology if you want to end in a cyber security career. It actually in my opinion is the best track. You need to understand basics of technology and computers to be good at cyber security. Also application programming knowledge goes a long way in security, as it helps in ease of analysis, automation is in great demand.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Joanne’s Answer

I agree with Jesse


A computer science degree provides a nice foundation. Within the degree, there are probably electives or even a 'track path' that will lead you to cyber security.


It's a win-win.

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jesse’s Answer

There is non it's a step in the right direction to your goal.

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Andrew’s Answer

Security is a subset/specialization of Computer Science and a CS degree with give you a foundational understanding of concepts needed to be a good security professional. There is no downside, in fact in the long run it might make you a better security professional by majoring in CS.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Felipe’s Answer

If you want to be a good cybersecurity professional you must have your major, it will give you all the basics and also teach you what you need to be a professional in the industry, then you can start study CS certifications such as Isaca CSX and others that will give you the specific knowledge you require to work on CS field, I’m currently a peofessional in that field so I have walked that path and for sure will lead you to success, please let me know if you need any further info.
Thanks
0