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How much of a difference is it to get your bachelors or masters degree when looking for a job?

I want to know the difference of a person who has the bachelors degree who’s looking for a job compared to a person who has masters degree looking for a job. job degree job-search career

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Gonzalo’s Answer

Hi Jaden - I think the answer to this question really depends on what industry/jobs you're interested in. Some might require higher-level education as entry criteria. You'll need to explore that.

One thing I've noticed personally is that real-life work experience generally goes much farther than practical education (again this will depend on what industry/fields you are interested in). This is because when you are "on the job" you will learn the skills that directly impact the success of that job as you go. These learning opportunities are usually more applicable than what you might learn in the classroom.

My recommendation would be to find either an internship or part-time job in an area of interest so you can begin exploring and building your skills. In the meantime, you can keep figuring out if a bachelor's degree is sufficient for the type of work that you'd like to pursue.

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Pantea’s Answer

Hi Jaden, I agree that real-life experience is more important than theoretical experience when first looking for a career. When looking for a new position I would be mindful that most companies will list they are looking for someone with 2-3 year of experience for an entry level position but this should not deter you. We often have more transferable skills than we realize. For example, I worked in retail while I was in college, while in that role I learned how to manage customers, build relationships, handle conflict and difficult conversations.

Now if you question is more monetary based, you can expect that someone with a Master's will most likely make $10K more in the same role as someone with a Bachelors.
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GABE’s Answer

I have found that it depends on the industry and the difference is more pronounced based on your experience. If you have no experience, then the Master's is important. If you have a Bachelor's and experience in the field you are looking to work in, then the Master's is less relevant. Those with a Masters degree didn't get the door flung open for them based on the degree, although it didn't hurt.

Finally, (right or wrong) the more prestigious the School, the better you will get looked at for the position.
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Lucie’s Answer

Hello Jaden,

From what I have seen (and done) a bachelor is more generic with courses aligned to your major. Continuing onto a master allows you to focus on one area of study.
For example: You have a bachelor in engineering and do not want to be an engineer you can do a master in business administration to give a business twist to your profile. This opens up roles too.

A master might be a hard thing to pick (and afford) right after a bachelor degree, one thing you can do is look for a job with your bachelor and complete your master once you have some working experience under your belt, as well as, a better idea of where you would like to specialize. A lot of companies also offer their employees a participation towards the tuition of a master degree that you can do while working.

Hope this helps,
Cheers
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Lauren’s Answer

Hi Jaden,
Great question! Obtaining your master's degree really depends on the field you are planning to work in post grad. For example, I was an accounting major in college so I received my master's degree following the completion of my bachelor's degree because of the credit requirement needed to sit for certification exams. I don't think it's crucial for you to get a master's degree right away, as a bachelor's degree prepares you for the workforce. But it is an option, especially if you wanted to complete another degree while you still have that academic/studying mindset right out of college as opposed to waiting later in your career. That said, if you were to wait to obtain the master's degree later in your career it could open doors for you to diversity yourself and even get promoted following some professional work experience.
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Kris’s Answer

Some roles require a master's degree as a job requirement (e.g. Accounting); many do not. You do not need to obtain a master's immediately after (nor in conjunction with) attaining a bachelor's degree...the master's can come many years later once it's more clear how the additional credential will help further your career. Let the requirements of the industry and job type you're interested in pursuing help guide your decision making here. Depending on where you end up, industry-specific certifications may be of more value than an degree from a university. Also try to speak with individuals who are already in the roles you're interested in to gauge their opinion.
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Molly’s Answer

This depends on the industry and/or the company you work for. I have a bachelor's degree in Engineering and kept getting blocked for a promotion at my old job. Just started at a new company where there are Executives with only bachelor's degrees :)
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