Skip to main content
13 answers
Asked Viewed 138 times Translate

Is Computer Science a good major? (or worth the time)

I'm a senior at Burton high school. I'm interesting in Computer Sciences however is doubtful due to the experience i have with coding, etc. college computerscience
computer-science computer-software technology computer-engineering

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

14
Pros
13
0
Students
1
0

13 answers


Updated Translate

Sajal’s Answer

If you ask me computer science is definitely a good major. But it depends on your passion for it. If you ask me, any subject or field is good if you are passionate about it. Unless you have a passion for it, you cannot do that stuff for long. Computer science by default is a bit harder than other computer-related majors that you can have (networking, cloud computing, security, etc.) as it relates to more classical subjects. Also, remember, today computer-related field is very specialized and computer science is an entry point to that. You may want to become a computer scientist, data scientist, analyst, architect, etc. So, a major in computer science does not mean you will have to become a software programmer only. Though you would need to understand the basics and be good at logic.
I did my engineering in "Electronics & Communication" with a specialization in computers and a master's in Computer Science. But I was never a software programmer and I am a Cloud Architect.
So, choose your target field and remember computer science major is a stepping stone towards that.
Hope this helps.
3
Pros
2
0
Students
1
0
Updated Translate

Colby’s Answer

Don't worry about your experience level, as it's of very little consequence. I was in my 30's and a Sophomore in college when I wrote my first line of code, and I graduated three years later with a Computer Science degree.

While Sajal is absolutely right that passion is important, it's not required. I sought out this degree specifically for the career opportunities it offered, as did many of my coworkers. Building software is a profession, not a lifestyle. Don't believe for a second that it's an exclusive club of hyper-geniuses who have been coding since they were infants. Anyone who claims otherwise is lying to you. I spent almost a decade driving garbage trucks. If I can do it, you can do it.

But be aware of what you're signing up for. Computer Science is an exceptionally demanding major. You will have to endure several years under constant pressure to perform at a very high level. While your friends in other majors are attending parties and going on adventures, you will be in the library studying and working on projects with your classmates. I remember hearing Business majors complain about having five hours of homework per week. You will likely have more than that every day.

It is not glamorous. It is not easy. The pressure to produce high quality results on a short timeline is relentless for years on end. Many will quit.

It is also, without a doubt in my mind, worth the hardship ten times over. The opportunities afforded to those who earn CS degrees are both vast and life-changing. You will almost certainly earn more money than any of your non-CS major friends. A year or two after you are hired to your (admittedly difficult to obtain) first job, assuming you perform well, companies will compete with one another to recruit you for the remainder of your career. I'm not saying the work is easy. It's not. But with the education you'll receive in college and the mentorship of Senior Engineers it's not even close to impossible.

Colby recommends the following next steps:

For now, focus on getting good grades and taking extra math classes. Programming is the application of logic, and math is just a form of logic.
When choosing a university, ask their recruiters about the school's CS program. Find out what their admission standards are for the major, not just the college. CS programs are generally much harder to get into than the schools that host them.
If you're not sure it's for you, take online classes such as Harvard's CS50 course. Find out if it's something you're interested in. CS may not require passion, but you should at least be somewhat interested in it.
Ask your guidance counselor or programming teacher to set you up with an informational interview with a software engineer to ask them any questions you have about the major and career field.
Set aside an hour one day and really think about if this is something you want to pursue. It's not going to be fun for a few years, and it's perfectly OK if you decide that's not what you want from life. It's better to decide sooner than later if this is worth the struggle. It was for me, but I'm not you.
2
Pros
1
0
Students
1
0
Updated Translate

Omar’s Answer

Great question! I think the first thing you need to answer for yourself is, are you interested more in the salary or do you have a true passion for it? I can tell you I explored a MIS degree strictly for the opportunities it could bring in salary, and I quickly pivoted to a different major myself. My true passion is people and I ended up with a mgmt degree, and ironically found myself in the tech world as a manager. The comments above are accurate, that you will need to dedicate a tremendous amount of time and challenge yourself if you go through with it. Do you have a set job title in mind that you are interested in? Research specific job functions to get an idea of what may truly speak to you. Its never too late to pick up a passion and explore it, Ive seen people do it well into their 30s and make great careers in the industry.

Some overall advice I can offer is to calibrate your mind into a willingness/ideology to work hard and work smart. Don't go into college half heartedly, be ready for the work! This will prepare you for the real world and help your brain build that muscle memory of a good work ethic that will pay off all your life if you have a strong foundation. There will always be a tremendous amount of competition you're up against for the rest of your career. Embrace it and be ready to be kind, stay humble, and outwork everyone around you.

1
Students
1
0
Updated Translate

Michael’s Answer

Computer science is a great major and will open up a world of career opportunities for you to consider. There are many potential career paths in technology today, so you should not think of computer science as just coding. Software engineering and coding is absolutely a potential career choice for someone with a degree in computer science, but there are roles such as project managers and scrum masters that lead project teams, business analysts that learn how to apply technology to solve business problems, computer technicians that provide technical support services, and data scientists that analyze data to solve business problems and create business opportunities. The future of the technology field is constantly changing and evolving and you will find that if you choose this field, you will have many different opportunities to choose from based on your interests.
1
Students
1
0
Updated Translate

Sabrina’s Answer

Computer Science is a wonderful major! It’s a field that allows you to pretty much work anywhere so there are a lot of diverse possibilities. I didn’t start coding until my junior year of college and have known people who have been very successful and started even later in life than that, so it’s not too late to start.

Even if coding itself doesn’t prove to be a perfect fit, a coding background can pave way to many different career options. You could become a sales engineer, a business analyst, technical project manager, or move up the ranks into management positions. And if it does end up being a great fit, you can become a great engineer!

One big benefit of studying Computer Science versus going directly into the field is that it establishes fundamentals and teaches you how to think and how to approach problem solving. This helps to find more creative solutions and to make it more intuitive to solve for performance and scalability.

I have always been an extrovert, so when I started in pure coding it was a bit more difficult since it was more isolated. Now that I’m in Engineering Management I feel extremely fulfilled and am very grateful I chose Computer Science as a major.
1
Students
1
0
Updated Translate

Gerald’s Answer

Hi, Computer Science is a great major and it's worth the time.
The first great thing about Computer Science is that it allows you to have to many career paths.
For example, you can be a DBA (Database Administrator), a coder / computer programmer, software developer, data scientist, project manager and the list goes on and on..

Another great thing about Computer Science is that you never stop learning. There is always something new to learn, whether it be a new platform or programming tool plus, most companies highly encourage their employees to participate in all types of internal / external trainings.

The third thing is there is shortage for professional with STEM ( Science Technology Engineer and Math) background and experience. What that means is you will be on-demand and will always be able to have a good paying job while you continue to grow....so from a Computer Science professional to anyone inspiring to take that path, my advice would be go for it....you won't regret it.
1
Students
1
0
Updated Translate

Joe’s Answer

Computer Science is an excellent field, however, I would say that you need to assess what your aptitude is for the kinds of jobs you would be doing. You want to go to work every day and really enjoy solving the problems in front of you.

Speaking for myself, I had a friend introduce me to building computers when I was about 12 years old. Instantly fascinated by these machines, driven from a love of video games, I started teaching myself everything I could about computers. This innate curiosity about technology - the desire to learn every system, piece of software, inside and out - has led me to a successful career in IT.

Also, there are many avenues to pursue getting into technology. Holding a Computer Science degree is NOT the only way to become a developer, for example. You can go to a vocational school, or coding bootcamp, and learn all the practical skills needed to have a successful start in the industry. That being said, a CS degree will keep your options open.

Joe recommends the following next steps:

Take a coding course, like Java 101, on coursera or udemy (or similar), and see if you enjoy it.
1
Students
1
0
Updated Translate

Mark’s Answer

I've been working with computers, technology, web development, and more for the past 20 years, and I didn't study computer science.

If you are thinking of a career as a software engineer or developer, then having an understanding of the theoretical aspects of computer science can be helpful - and might help you write better code. It is by no means necessary though.

Having hands on experience, and a portfolio of software projects to show your abilities can be very useful.

If you want to take what you already know in regards to programming, and level that up with an understanding of what's happening in the underlying processing of your code - so that you can write faster, simpler, or more purposeful code - consider the cost benefits of that choice.

A degree in CS does trade off your time and money (for tuition, as well as expenses and lack of income during your studies) versus what you might be able to achieve with a more focused study or certification.

You should also consider learning about more than just CS - understanding creative processes, humanities, philosophy, ethics is just as important in a long term career, where you'll be asked to create software that is used by individuals, and society at large.
1
Students
1
0
Updated Translate

Anup’s Answer

Computer Science is a great major in current market. There are a lot of different career paths you can choose within computer science. I would make sure you get into internships programs that can really help you develop your coding capability as well as giving you a fresh idea of what you can except once you start working for a company.
0
Updated Translate

Naganandini’s Answer

Computer science is off-course a good Major. You will get lots of practical experience with logical thinking and problem solving.
Exposure to get logical and problem solving is the experience to gain rather sticking to any one programming/coding language so not to worry about current coding skill. Scripting tool/programming languages changes every decade. Logical thinking helps as person to grow and attitude to learn continuously will take you to heights. All the best!!

Also, as I mentioned computer science is a good Major but studying in good university/college also gives lots of exposure and job opportunities.
0
Updated Translate

Jason’s Answer

Computer Science is a great major to pick. Don't let a lack of experience with coding deter you from pursuing a degree in Computer Science. If you enjoying problem solving or building/creating things Computer Science will have opportunities for you to enjoy. You don't have to have the experience prior to going to college. College is there to help you learn and develop those skills. If you are still worried about your prior experience there are plenty of tutorials online that can help you get started. Remember many people who are working in the IT field had little to no experience prior to college. It's ok.
0
Updated Translate

Alex’s Answer

If you think you have an interest and aptitude for coding, CS is a great major. As a high-school student, you should be able to answer that question. My advice is not to go into CS without a genuine interest and fundamental curiosity, because the individuals that are in it for the money are easily spotted by those that have been it it before it was trendy.

As others have said, if you want to be a part of the industry, but don't feel you have a flair for the math, logic, and coding, get involved in other ways -- sales, management track, QA, or other paths. A B.B.A. degree would be a great start.
0
Updated Translate

Subathra’s Answer

To my knowledge, it is a good option. I would suggest you choose Computer Science as your major if you are interested in it. Still, if you want to get into a managerial role, or would like to take a different role in IT such as Business Analyst, Quality Assurance Analyst, I would suggest you take MBA in which Business Analysis or Computer Management as the core subjects.

Talk with your seniors or discuss with your friends or family who works in your preferred role. All the best!
0