Skip to main content
10 answers
10
Asked 300 views

What is the most important thing about moving on from highschool to college?

I've heard from multiple older acquaintances that college is more about studying than social life and others have said the opposite. I want to hear from others, that aren't very biased on their college experience, which is more important, or if there's another part of this "coming to age" transition that should be more important. This is a big conflict for me because I'm not sure what to pursue either.

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

10

10 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Eugenia’s Answer

College life doesn't neatly fall into one bucket because it depends on what you make of the experience, how your managed your time, and what you prioritize. For many students college is their first experience of semi-independence from family and their hometown friends. Social life comes into play where you need to build new circles of friends though your living situation (dorms), academics (sharing classes), or through interest-based clubs & sports.

Being successful in college doesn't equate to hours spent studying. "Studying" for 5 hours a day isn't meaningful if you're spending 3 of those hours on TikTok or Netflix. Part of the transition is learning time management and prioritization. Determining your schedule allows you to budget time for projects, self-care, social activities, and sleep!

If you're uncertain about choosing a major, colleges & universities have student resources that can help. There are career and academic counselors, you can even connect with professors for insight. Also there are mentorship or shadowing opportunities within the college or through their alumni network.
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Krystal’s Answer

I truly believe that college is what you make it. In my transition from high school to college, I struggled with balancing it all since both my studies and extracurriculars. Eventually, I was able to fall into a good rhythm and learn when to prioritize studying and when to step back and take a break from studying. It is definitely an adjustment but you have to find what is important to you, then delegate your time effectively. Good Luck!
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Clinton’s Answer

Hi Kaitlyn,

For many, college is the first time that they are not living with parents, and potentially being far away from home. It is an opportunity to explore independence and grow into yourself. Take your time, there's room for mistakes, but make sure to learn from them. Try to maintain an open mind to try new things that your college environment offers. There's no one right path, so take the chance to explore and try new things.

Aside from classes and education, it might be the first time you have to manage your own schedule, finances, social calendar, and interests. These are great skills to develop and fine-tune. College can be a great environment, and don't forget to take advantage of its many resources, whether it is clubs, gatherings, sororities/fraternities, and events.

College is a great place to learn and develop intrinsic motivation and interests. I wish you the very best experience.
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

M’s Answer

Hi Kaitlyn! This is a great question! I would argue that it is a bit of both. I think college gives you a foundation/guidance of not only establishing your career path but you learn so much about yourself! I would recommend that if you are a driven individual, you should be going into college with the mindset of focusing on yourself, establishing a good foundation for your career and the social aspect should come with that. However, if your main goal is to meet new people and that is your purpose for going to school, then maybe go to a school with a greater social life. Hope this helped, and good luck Kaitlyn!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

LaQuinta’s Answer

Hey Kaitlyn! One thing about your college experience is that yours will be completely different than others because it's yours. Gaining your post secondary education is important, but I feel like having a healthy social life is equally important. These are critical years of your life that lay out the roadmap for you entering into your professional career, and even though the educational peace looks good on paper, your social skills will carry you through your interview. As a recruiter, you have to remember, we see your resume first so you want to make sure it stands out from the rest. As the hiring manager, I am seeing many people with the same skills you have on paper, but will your personality and curiosity is what will draw a hiring manager to you. I wish you all the best as you pursue your degree! I hope this helps!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Ethiopia’s Answer

I would say being able to multi-task and make your life what you want it to be daily is definitely a transition. Learning and establishing your boundaries as far as your schedule and activities both socially and education-wise are the beginning steps to adulthood. For me, I was able to handle it because of the rigorous high school training that I received definitely gave me an advantage because I was already structured to be organized and multi-task.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Scott’s Answer

Learn your most effective study patterns. (Library, common areas) and how much time you can actually study before your not absorbing anymore and need a break. (I was good for an hour, then took a 10 minute break, and after that it was 40 on, 20 off)

Don't procrastinate on assignments. I promise you, if you wait until the last minute, that last minute will also be on the same night your crush invites you to a party. Spread assignments out, use your time wisely and learn to backwards plan. (This is a tremendously valuable life skill).

As far as 'the college experience', your primary focus should be your studies. Once you have your assignments complete and your other tasks prioritized, live life to the fullest. Experiment with different social settings, have fun. Just remember, you are there for a degree, probably an expensive degree, stay focused on that goal.

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Sean’s Answer

One of the keys moving from high school to college will be time management. How you use your time outside of the classroom is just as important as the time you spend in the classroom. College success will be directly aligned with your ability to plan and use your outside of the class time effectively. With that in mind, I would recommend creating a weekly routine where you spend time planning your short term actions (homework, projects, studying) along with understanding the longer term projects/exams that you will also need to be preparing for with you time management. I would recommend spending 15-30 min every Sunday on time management and planning.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for the question. Firstly, congratulations to move your study life from high school to college!
In the college, on one hand you would learn more advance knowledge & skills in your chosen major & minor subjects. On the other hand, the college also focus to train up your analysis and critical thinking skills which are essential to your career in the future.
Apart from learning, you will have more social life in the college compared to the high school days. There more more extra curriculum activities you can participate. This is an good opportunities to start gaining experience to organize the activities and establish network with schoolmates coming from different faculties. These are invaluable asset to you. You can consider to stay in the hall as well. You can try to live independently.
College live is one of the most enjoyable days to you!
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Rachel’s Answer

If you're not sure what to pursue yet, I would definitely not accrue a lot of debt. I went to a small community college that allowed me to live on my own and experience 'adulting,' while being able to pay for the experience on my own. Then I transferred to a University with my AA degree.

0