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How many hours/days do a LPN works in a week?

I there a minim or max hours/days a LPN can work in a week? I was wanting to work as a LPN while getting my bachelor's in nursing to get my RN. But I'm worried that I won't get enough hours/day.

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Liz’s Answer

I would say anywhere between 36 hours to 60 hours or more a week.

Thank you comment icon I appreciate this, thank you for the advice. Cheyenne
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Liza’s Answer

Hello Cheyenne and thanks for the question. I think Tricia answered your question fully. I would add to decide, even if it's through trial and error, to maintain a work-life balance that works for you, such as 8 hour shifts, 12 hour shifts, school full time or part time. We don't want you burned out.
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Tricia’s Answer

Generally, there is no difference between hours of work for RNs and LPNs. It is state-specific, and the place to find out is your State Board of Nursing, local nursing union contract, or state laws to narrow it down. Outside of these entities, organizations will have policies on hours worked that could be based on their accreditation agency's suggestions or any other reason. For example, some will have you cannot work longer than a 16-hour shift or must have at least 6 hours between shifts, or 16 hours in a 24 hour period or in the calendar day (meaning the difference between 3 am today to 3 am tomorrow OR the time from midnight one day to 11:59 PM on the same day) it's very specific and individualized to the institution/agency you work for.
Your school of nursing will have support staff/mentors that can assist you with the process of obtaining a license after a certain amount of credits earned, or working as a "tech", but they will know the state requirements. Depending on your learning preference, it is often encouraged to obtain clinical experience while in school because you can integrate your new knowledge right away. There is value in every position in health care, it's what you make of it that matters.

Tricia recommends the following next steps:

Check out your state board, union, and laws for "hours of work"
Review the college website you are anticipating attending, look for "work programs" "pre-licensure" "clinical experience"
Thank you comment icon Thanks for the advice. Cheyenne
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Kruti’s Answer

No matter the facility's specialty, full-time employees on hospital nursing units typically work either three 12-hour shifts weekly (the days may or may not be consecutive), or in five eight-hour shifts. Round-the-clock coverage means many nurses must work weekends and holidays, usually on a rotating basis.
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