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What are the best places to work as a aerospace engineer?

Where and what are some good places for this job?

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Carl’s Answer

Hello Noah. I'm probably not qualified to say what is the "best" place to work as an Aerospace engineer but a few organizations come to mind. Of course, there is the military. They do rely on commercial organizations for their equipment but they do direct research, oversee equipment production, and supervise the development of aircraft. This leads me to a few commercial organizations. Organizations such as Lockheed and Boeing often have large contracts with the military, providing a lot of the equipment the military uses.

Carl recommends the following next steps:

Visit https://www.careersinthemilitary.com/career-detail/aerospace-engineers
Look up Lockhead Martin to learn about careers in aerospace engineering at their company
Look up Boeing to learn about careers in aerospace engineering at their company
Look up the Naval Academy to learn about the curriculum for becoming an aerospace engineer
Look up the Air Force Academy to learn about their curriculum for becoming an aerospace engineer
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Shalvi’s Answer

A marine engineer must also keep management up to date on expenditures and progress reports on a regular basis. They are also responsible for resolving any issues that arise. As can be seen, maritime engineers may complete the majority of the work from the comfort of their office. They must remain on the ships for inspection and to have a deeper understanding of the ship's and crew's requirements. They also perform maintenance work; for example, a marine engineer with expertise in offshore drilling may be necessary to manage the machine's and process components' maintenance and repair.

The various career options in Aeronautical Engineering are -
1. Aerodynamics engineer
2. Design engineer
3. Aeronautical engineer
4. Engineering consultant
5. Electrical engineer
6. Buyers and procurement officers
7. CNC programmers for the aerospace industry
8. CAD technician

For more info please check out this website - https://www.topuniversities.com/student-info/careers-advice-articles/9-careers-you-can-have-degree-aeronautical-engineering
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Lane’s Answer

There is no right answer to this. It depends on your specialty (structures, propulsion, thermo, electrical, aero, etc.) more than anything else.

I have had probably a more broad experience than your average engineer. Based on my experience, I would say you are better off looking for the smaller aerospace companies that provide support/engineering for the big OEMs. I greatly prefer the more dynamic and varied experience I got from working with/at small companies. My first job, I was the only employee for almost 2 years before we grew enough to start hiring more engineers. :)

It also depends on your interests? Satellites and more orbital/space related businesses are not the same as aircraft manufacturers.

My favorite job was actually working for a helicopter manufacturer. The reason it was my favorite was mostly because I always volunteered to go into the field when we were doing flight testing, so I got to fly on the helicopter about 2 weeks/year.
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Robert’s Answer

Similar to Carl's answer, the "best" place to work is going to be defined by the person you are talking with and their experiences good or bad. Aviation is very diverse in where you can work; while aerospace engineering is a bit more focused but still very broad if you explore the options. Given that everyone knows about the major aerospace companies thanks to their huge marketing budgets, I wont go down that road. I will say that for every larger company out there, there are a hundred smaller support companies who also hire aerospace engineers. These support companies do much, if not all, of the actual engineering work in many cases and can have multiple clients from the big designers (i.e. Boeing or GE) as well as the major Airlines around the world and the military. Thus, you can work projects in different areas of aviation in a single day sometimes. AE has needs from the birth of the aircraft all the way to its retirement. While working at a large firm with a big name can be a great fit for some, most of the best engineers I know work for the smaller support companies. There, they have more influence on the company leadership and tend to do the work of 3-5 engineers just simply out of necessity. If that sounds like more work for the same pay ... you are probably right in some cases, but in my experience the extra work leads to more opportunities down the road because you gain 3-5 times the engineering experience in less time than working 3-5 distinct jobs at a larger company with 1000's of engineers to pigeonhole.
Also, don't overlook opportunities later in your career at the FAA or your country's civil aviation authority (CAA). They have offices all over the US and in other countries. The jobs range from hands-on engineering and research to project management as well as international affairs and diplomacy. Working for the FAA (or your country's CAA) can also lead to opportunities with the United Nation's International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO).

Robert recommends the following next steps:

https://www.faa.gov/jobs
https://www.icao.int/Pages/default.aspx
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