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Is my career choice a good decision?

I'm only a freshman in high school, so I am able to change my decision, but I think this is probably what I want to do. I just wanted some more peoples' opinions about it, whether I should minor in something else as a backup plan or something.

So, my plan is to major in an equine degree in college, probably Equine Studies unless there is a better one offered. After college, I really want to have my own farm for people to board their horses and be a horse trainer and a riding instructor. Do you think I'll be making enough to have a good and comfortable life? I don't know if I want to have kids yet, and if I do I'll probably only want one or two, so do you think I'd be able to provide for them (if they exist) and myself, plus a SO? Also, how long do you think it would take to build that business after college? I would have to buy the land/house/barn(s), make sure fencing was good, and that would be a lot of money alone. I also don't know where I would want to live, so any ideas of where would be the most beneficial/cost efficient/best overall would be great.

I've always wanted to work with horses, in Kindergarten when they ask you what you want to be, I said a Cowgirl. I showed and rode for a few years, but it was expensive and the horses I used weren't great (one was too old and the other went lame), so I've had to stop, and since then it's been my goal to make a life with horses. I also wanted to be a teacher for a while. I think this is what I really want to do. Are there any other little jobs I could do to make extra money if I need? Preferably including horses or teaching? Sorry this is so long, but any answers would be amazing!

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Subject: Career question for you

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Harish’s Answer

Generally people who own horses/large stables in the US are already multi-millionaires. Owning horses, maintaining their shelter/basic needs, and hiring people to take care of the horses is very expensive.

If you're not currently a multi-millionaire, then doing a major in Equine Studies may not be the wisest move to make. There's not very many jobs for Equine Studies majors (unless you already own a large farm) and you'd probably be stuck working on someone else's farm for a low income. Horses are a financial investment like any other business, and you need lots of capital in order to have a successful horse farm. Capital (unless you are already a multi-millionaire) comes from savings, which comes from having a high-earning job, which comes from going into a high-earning major.

Instead, what if you do a lucrative major (STEM, medicine, law, econ .etc.) and then invest your savings into a horse farm? You'll make a lot more money from your job than if you did Equine Studies, and can also create a much larger farm due to your influx of capital. Depending on how much money you save up, you can buy dozens of acres of land (in a semi-rural area) and own dozens of horses. You can also hire all the labor you need, and pay for any upkeep you need. Become wealthy from your high-earning job, and it will be easy to have a large horse farm :)
Thank you comment icon Thanks for the advice! That makes sense, I'll think about some other majors I'm interested in for sure! Cera
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Joanie’s Answer

Hi Cera, if you have free time after school and/or during the weekends, I recommend you reach out to an equestrian center or someone that runs a farm and inquire about any job or volunteer opportunities. You will learn a lot from someone that already has a great deal of experience in this field and he/she can share with you how they got to where they are today. You're still very young so focus on learning and exploring your passion. Have fun!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! I'll definitely look around for someone, I think that's a great idea! Cera
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Barbara’s Answer

When I mentioned my career to my parents they made me sit down and look for open jobs, note the location of the jobs, and the pay. Then I had to research apartments/houses in those locations. Come up with a whole monthly budget and see if it could support the life I wanted. The numbers supported my choice. I don't know how much a horse farm costs, but I do know horses are expensive and typically a luxury. More realistic is being a partner with a farm or manager of one. You can likely find some job postings for that to get you started. Good luck!
Thank you comment icon Thats a good idea, I will definitely try to do that! I'm just not sure where I want to live after college, I like my hometown but I kind of want to get out of it, plus Michigan weather isn't the best. But after I figure that out, that's a great idea! Thanks! Cera
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Sikawayi’s Answer

Hello Cera. thank you for your question it's good that you are thinking about your future, if you already have goals set that's great but remember you are very young you may change your mind there is nothing wrong with. As for which direction you should go you are the only person who can answer that question. As far as basing your career path on how many kids you may or may not have, A lot of people do this. You are very wise to be so young I'm sure you will make the right decision.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for the advice! My sister is going to college this year, so I've been thinking a lot about it. Cera
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Bright’s Answer

Hi cera, you seem to have numerous choices on your table about what to do. Your aspirations are good but it all centred on having a strong financial backup. But I think you need to have a short-term(1 to 3 years) and long-term goals(5 to 8 years) project. Your aspiration is a long-term goal which needs capital investment. Your short-term goal has to do with the temporal work that can enable you to earn a good income to supplement your long-term goal. Which of the career options stand tall among the rest that you're passionate about it? Your aspiration is equivalent to being a sole proprietor desiring to start something which is a gradual process. If you are passionate about teaching work, then as you earn you invest part of your income. It's a gradual process but surely you will live to see your dream fulfil.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, that makes sense. I'll probably try to find a barn or somewhere to work at first, possibly something else, and save up to start my own business. Thank you again! Cera
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Karissa’s Answer

Hi Cera!

You have received some really great advice to your question already! I would like to add a an additional comment.

First, I want to say how important is to be passionate about the career you choose! It's great that you know what you are passionate and that you are exploring career paths that will allow you earn income and provide while working your passion.

As mentioned previously, I would suggest volunteering and reaching out to others who are currently doing this and to ask for additional advice - I'm sure they would be open to being a mentor and giving you advice!

Best of luck to you!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! I will definitely keep my eye out for anyone! Cera
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