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What should I major in when in college ?

I am a senior and unsure in what to major in college.

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Subject: Career question for you

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Daniel’s Answer

Great question Isaiah!

First things first - if you don't know where you want to go to college that's ok! Most people do not know what they want to do the rest of their lives and it can be stressful to think about. I felt the same way a couple of years ago right before I graduated high school. My suggestion is to go to a community college to obtain your basics. This will help you have time to try some different jobs in completely different fields. Also, by going to a community college you will be saving money and giving yourself more time to decide on a career/job while making progress on your degree. Don't let people put pressure on you that you have to decide now on the rest of your work life. I had a teacher in high school tell me that I would be a failure if I did not know what degree/career I wanted by the time I graduated high school. Well, I did not by graduation but decided a year later on what I wanted to do and absolutely love it (fraud & operations)

I really think business is a great field to go into since it keeps your options wide open. That way you are not committing to one specific field and find out later that you hate it. Some fields in business include:

1. Operations
2. Finance
3. Sales
4. Marketing
5. Human Resources

I decided to go into Business Operations since operations touches almost every facet of the organization. I enjoy the different challenges and operations also gives me the flexibility to try new things. Another great aspect about operations is they usually support the other divisions of an organization. Since, there are many divisions of an company if you do not enjoy one area its not a big deal since you can support other areas of the business.

Many larger companies will start you in a rotational analyst program. By doing this you will get to see usually 2-4 different sections of the business. Companies offer this to not only help you hone in on your career path but many companies have realized that if there employees actually enjoy their job they will get better overall performance.

Lastly, I know it may be easy to get discouraged but just know your not the only person that feels this way. Many other people are going through the same process. You are not alone!
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Aisha’s Answer

Hello,

My advice would be if you are undecided, talk to people in fields that interest you. Volunteer in these fields and definitely do your research in these fields. When you are choosing your classes, add some diversity to your schedule so you don't knock out all of the core classes at once and are then left struggling to choose classes towards a major that you haven't decided on yet. Spread out the core classes so you are able to take intro classes for any given area until you are sure on your major. Set goals along the way and try your best to stick to them.

Good Luck!!!!
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Joseph’s Answer

When you are unsure it may be best to not select a particular major simply classes of interest. I did similar and ended up in the Management Information Systems.

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Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for the question. A lot of students have the same question. Perhaps you have to find out what career you want to do first.
Below are my suggestions :
1. Think about your hobbies, favorite subjects, etc. and determine the related careers. E.g.
If you are interested in Maths, would you like to be an accountant, engineer, banker, financial analyst, maths teacher, etc.
If you are interested in Music, would you like to be a musician, singer, music teacher, composer, music producer, etc.
2. Explore more on these career and find out what you have interest
3. Speak to someone who are working in these careers. Seek guidance from your mentor, school career counsellor, your parents, etc.
4. Shortlist 1-2 career you would like to pursue
5. Explore the entry criteria of relevant subjects in the college
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
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Debra’s Answer

Don’t ask yourself “What major should I choose?” The right question is “What major is right for me?” Being a young adult it is ok to not know, talk to your family they may know you the best, teachers, and the internet is filled with so much info. There are so different many ways to start your journey and explore what career is right for you. Of course, it may change along the way as you gain experience in life, school and in the work world.

For tests to see what major is right for you, check out the “What should I major in quiz” by Loyola or the “college major personality quiz” from ThoughtCo.

Good luck and I wish you success in your journey.

" Follow the butterflies"

Debra
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Jerome’s Answer

I ended up getting a Letters, Arts and Sciences degree. It allowed me to take a wide assortment of classes find that I really enjoyed Psychology and helping people. You could do a general studies degree, look to satisfy base requirements for most Bachelors degrees while also experiencing a few different disciplines.

As also shared by another, get out and network, attend career days and potentially do an internship or two. It may feel like you have to have it all decided tomorrow, but you have time.

Jerome recommends the following next steps:

Explore General Study Degrees
Attend A Job Fair
Network & Talk With Others About Their Work
Explore Internships
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Roberto’s Answer

It is a great question, and the answer is: don't fret too much on it yet, just get started in the college path. There is great advise already in the chat. The reality is that many people do not even end up having a career that strictly follows their college majors.

If I understand correctly what you might be really asking yourself, it is a great question that is not only limited to college or the choice of a major. Life itself is about that question. Time and again you will be presented with choices on which door to take without the benefit of too much foresight. My experience is that a choice by itself wont be the limiting factor as long as you stay, both committed to your chosen path and open to other choices.

I myself have stuck to one of my majors, you could say, but the filed on which I work has changed so much that even though it is the same, it may look different now than when I chose it over 30 years ago. More so, others with the same major have gone many different paths. I majored in Telecommunications and Electronics, two fields that have branched and evolved so much that now many of us look more like IT professionals. Also I work along side other great professionals that majored in Law, Psychology or even culinary arts ! My buddy is a great Information Security Engineer yet still can grill and smoke like pro.

My point is: do something you think you like, something with a high probability of success and commit to it without closing other doors. Like my dad used to say: "It is not the door we take what counts, but the ones we do not close behind"

Good luck !!!
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Lisa’s Answer

Hi Isaiah,
Good question and the answer is that you may not need to declare a major on your college application when you’re a senior in high school.

For most colleges and universities, you will have at least the first year and a half to decide. These colleges expect you to work with your career center team, faculty, consider the classes you excel in as options, and do your research.

Some college even encourage students to start their degrees in a foreign country or to do study abroad to get exposure to the options available across the globe.

There are schools that will allow you to create your own major as well. The key is to take the initiative with such opportunities.

In the meantime, you can start by looking into your fields and careers of interest and follow the steps that Rebecca has outlined for you nicely (see below).

Finally, you can also do more research on your own by conducting informal interviews with individuals who have interesting jobs or careers. This research may lead you to different opportunities like mini-externships, exploratoriums, science and historical museums, city and government facilities, banks and investment organizations, architectural and engineering firms, etc. You get the picture. Explore, explore, explore.

I hope this helps!

Lisa
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