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What kind of job field should I pursue if I like to build things and like technology?

12 grade
Like building Lego
Like star wars
Like video games

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

17

16 answers


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Deepthi’s Answer

Great question!

I would ask you to think about how you define "building".

You could build things "tactically/manually" with your hands - such as houses, clothes, pipes, things. For this, you'd go into businesses such as construction, electrician, plumber, tailoring, etc.

Or you could also build things "virtually" - such as writing code that makes a device work, or building hardware that the code works on.

Or you could also build "people" or "projects" - such as building a team (hiring, recruiting), building a project plan (project management).

If you have the opportunity to go to college, then you will be exposed to some of this through your curriculum. Alternatively, if you do not have the option to, or are choosing not to pursue college immediately, you could start with one of the dimensions above to discover your own interest/strengths/what you like/don't like and then go from there.

Best of luck!
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Don’s Answer

Good Evening Derek,

Sounds like you maybe interested in a job in “The Trades” (A skilled job, typically one requiring manual skills and special training).

Some options for your career research:

1. Technology
2. Construction Project Manager
3. Civil, Mechanical or Electrical Engineer
4 . Electrician
5. Plumber
6. Construction Equipment Operator
7. Renewable Energy (Wind & Solar)

I hope this helps.

-Don
Thank you comment icon Your advice was so helpful! Derek
Thank you comment icon Your Welcome! Keep me posted on your career research. Always feel free to reach out to others for advice. You need a team in life to be successful. 👍🏻 Don Murray
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Patrick’s Answer

You should consider looking into Artificial Intelligence and see if that sparks any interest - this is a field that will be big over the coming years and if you have the right personality for it, it can also be incredibly exciting. It seems like you have an interest in tech as well so you could take a look at what typical roles look like at the big tech companies like Apple, Microsoft, Sony, and Google. Don't let salaries drive your decision - find an area that gets you excited and you'll find yourself naturally researching more into them. Keep in mind Gaming is a huge industry and has lots of roles available as well!
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David C’s Answer

Hi Derek,
I think you may be interested in a robotics related career. Here are some suggestions.

1. Electromechanical technician
National average salary: $56,209 per year
Primary duties: Electromechanical technicians read blueprints to translate schematics and diagrams. They use these diagrams to identify the proper method to assemble parts, machines and other technological and electronic equipment.

They use precise measurements and technical knowledge to ensure efficient assembly. Electromechanical technicians can serve in many environments, including computing, aerospace, plastics and robotics.

2. Mechanical engineer
National average salary: $80,124 per year
Primary duties: Mechanical engineers design, develop, build, test and maintain mechanical devices and systems. They may work on specific machines, tools or engines. In the robotics field, they typically develop sensors and other devices that robotics engineers use during the physical installation of a robot. Mechanical engineers may also conduct research to find the most cost-effective ways to build parts.

3. Robotics engineer
National average salary: $87,640 per year
Primary duties: Robotics engineers are responsible for designing, developing, testing, building and servicing robots. The goal of their work is to engineer robots that are productive and safe for a variety of purposes. They often use computer-aided design and manufacturing software to draft their plans.

Robotics engineers collaborate closely with software developers to create highly sophisticated robots that can perform certain tasks properly. Robotics engineers might interface with market scientists to find the most cost-effective materials needed to build robots.

Designer Dave
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is really helpful. Derek
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Adam’s Answer

computer science and programming
design and manufacturing
computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM)
Mechanical engineering
Thank you comment icon Thanks for the advice. Derek
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Ray’s Answer

If you like building things, it sounds like you may be a good fit for an engineer or programmer.
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Steve’s Answer

This is a timely question. Building something tangible I would suggest any of the trades that you might be good at. They are in short supply and are generally well paying; for less risk, start as an apprentice with a larger company until you are really good at it then perhaps venture on your own. Being self-employed, in addition to being the backbone of our economy , can be highly rewarding and meaningful!
If you enjoy something more technical/software based - anything in Cloud or AI. This is what I have told my kids now. Not only will this career path be in top demand it will be a skill set that is highly transferable to many technical companies.
Good Luck - and Work Hard, aim to be the best in field!
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Arthur’s Answer

Hi Derek. You had me at Star Wars (I am a total Star Wars fan). There are so many applications that are a cross between technology and building. One great example is how The Mandolorian was created using technology to simulate environments in 3D "green screen" studios. These involve lots of programming and graphic design to create the awesome environments that you see on screen. In addition, they utilize a ton of compute space and rely on cloud networks to help with rendering.
Like several others have mentioned, there are multiple opportunities to use your hands and combine with technology. Many colleges offer a combination of both hands-on skills combined with technology like Cal Tech, Wentworth Institute of Technology University, and many others.
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James Constantine’s Answer

As an engineer, you might find it beneficial to delve into the world of information technology and computer science. Learning to program with a language like Microsoft Visual Studio, as I did, could enrich your professional journey. It even complemented my other role as a dietitian. The engineering field offers a plethora of roles that are increasingly attracting women. At present, I can't think of any fields more promising than engineering or architecture. So, why not give them a shot? Enroll in a reputable university, pursue a bachelor's degree, and if possible, aim for a master's or even a PhD. This will significantly enhance your employability and open up a world of opportunities.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hey there, Derek!

If you're someone who loves to create and has a knack for technology, there's a whole world of career paths waiting for you to explore. Let's take a look at some of them:

Mechanical Engineering: As a mechanical engineer, you'd get to create, build, and take care of machines and mechanical systems. These could be used in various sectors, from manufacturing to transportation. You'd get to work with computer-aided design (CAD) software and other cool tools to bring your ideas to life.

Electrical Engineering: If you're more into electronics and circuits, electrical engineering might be your thing. Here, you'd design, create, and test electrical systems and electronic devices. These could be used in power generation, communication systems, and computers. You'd get to use software tools like circuit simulators and CAD software.

Computer Science: Love coding and software development? Computer science could be your calling. As a computer scientist, you'd design, develop, and test software and hardware systems. These could be used in video games, mobile devices, and other tech applications. You'd get to work with programming languages like Python, Java, and C++.

Robotics Engineering: If you're excited about building and programming robots, robotics engineering is the way to go. As a robotics engineer, you'd design, build, and program robots for various industries, including manufacturing, healthcare, and transportation.

Aerospace Engineering: If designing aircraft and spacecraft gets your heart racing, aerospace engineering might be for you. Aerospace engineers design, build, and test aircraft and spacecraft for commercial aviation, military defense, and space exploration.

But that's not all! There are plenty of other careers that merge the joy of building with a love for technology. Some of these include:

Product Design: As a product designer, you'd get to design and develop new products for various industries.
Manufacturing Engineering: As a manufacturing engineer, you'd design and optimize the processes and systems used to create products.
Materials Science: As a materials scientist, you'd study the properties and applications of various materials and develop new ones for different industries.

If you want to dive deeper into these fields, here are some books that might help:

“The Engineer’s Guide to Building and Designing Robots” by John M. R. Parsons and David S. R. Kumar.
“Mechanical Engineering: A Practical Introduction” by David G. Goodman.
“Introduction to Electrical Engineering” by R. W. Deans.

These books will give you a solid understanding of these fields and help you figure out which one suits your interests and skills the best.

Wishing you all the best on your journey!
James.
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Ahmad’s Answer

I'm the same way - with the same interests.
For me, I went into entrepreneurship and started a tech business with my friend. It didn't work out financially but we learned a TON and met incredibly smart and interesting people along the way.
What I discovered I loved most about that experience was being a Product Manager. A Product Manager is someone who (on a team) leads the direction of a product, innovates, and builds tools for users.

I think if you're not necessarily technical (have an engineering degree or can code) a Product Manager route is a great option. It keeps you close to building technology process, it's problem solving based, you get to think bigger picture about the product and the users, and you get to work on a team - all really fun things.

Hope this helps.
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Guillermo’s Answer

You should explore Engineering as the first stage, then you may look into robotics and software development, and finally you can master AI (Artificial intelligence).
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Michelle’s Answer

Sounds like Engineering would be a great fit for you! Mechanical and Civil Engineering are a strong foundation for building and maintaining physical structures. Computer Engineering or Programming would be great fields for building in the virtual world.
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Kaidi’s Answer

Hi Derek, I know this is not directly answering your question, but I would strongly recommend you read a book called 'Designing Your Life' by Bill Burnett and Dave Evans. This book will walk you throw how to build the perfect career step by step according to your needs. You are going to find a fulfilling career. This is also a practical guide for writing down what is most important to you.
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Kimanu’s Answer

Seems like the possibilities are endless. You're a thinker , creater, drafter , and an influencer. Do you use social media ? Maybe posting things you create could gain alot.of attention , keep a record or catalog of original things you create, always write down your ideas and thoughts. Use your resources volunteer or look into internships in some of the respective fields you have interests in.
Thank you comment icon I will use this advice as I prepare for my career. Derek
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lakeesha’s Answer

There are so many career paths that these skills translate into, some examples are: Product designer, Architect, Electronics engineer, Robotics engineer, Civil engineer, Video game designer, Tattoo artist, and Interior designer.
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