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I need help deciding what I would like to major in.

Hey! I have a general idea of what job I would like to have. I know I want to do something science based, I just have no clue what exactly I want to do. I was leaning towards something more medicine related, but then I think I decided Biology was more of my thing. I just want a fulfilling job, any advice?

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Laura’s Answer

Great question, this was me in high school as well!

I can share a bit about the field of Food Science, as that was my degree program as well as career so far. Food Science combines the fields of chemistry, microbiology, engineering and nutrition in ways that apply specifically to food. A bonus that I found when looking at majors was that a secondary degree beyond undergrad (masters, Phd, etc) wasn't required to start working in the field.

Food science has a broad range of job types within the field. I have mostly worked in product development, which involves creating new flavors or food products, figuring out how to scale recipes from a lab scale to a manufacturing facility, and working with marketing and other teams across a company to launch, improve, and optimize products. Several other types of jobs include: quality, engineering, regulatory, sensory, and more. I have loved being able to apply scientific principles to real-life problems and create delicious products that end up on store shelves!

Not all schools will have this type of degree program, but typically larger schools with a agriculture background would (Penn State, Cornell, UC Davis, etc). Some schools will also have a Food Science focus within nutrition, but if you're really interested in science, a full Food Science program might be the better way to go. Or a general biology, microbiology or chemistry degree would be a way in to working at a food company in their analytical department.

Best of luck as you explore different options!
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Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for your question. Many students have similar question. I am delighted to hear that you have found your interest on science especially biology already.
Below are my suggestions:
1. Have you thought about being doctor, pharmacist, biochemical engineer, science or biology teacher, etc. You can explore more on the related careers
2. Find out more on these careers and determine what you have interest
3. Speak to someone who are working in these careers.
Seek advice from your mentor, your school career counsellor, your parents, etc
4. Shortlist 1-2 careers your would like to pursue
5. Explore the entry criteria of the relevant subjects in the college
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much!! It really is greatly apprciated Kadence
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Daniel’s Answer

Hello there!

There are several biology-related majors that can be fulfilling, depending on your interests and career goals. Here are a few options:

Biology: A general biology major covers a broad range of topics, giving you a solid foundation in various aspects of biology. It allows flexibility in choosing elective courses based on your interests.

Molecular Biology: This major focuses on the study of biological processes at the molecular level, including DNA, RNA, proteins, and genetic engineering. It is ideal if you have an interest in genetics and biochemistry.

Microbiology: If you're fascinated by microorganisms like bacteria, viruses, and fungi, a microbiology major may be a good fit. This field explores their structure, function, interactions, and their roles in human health, ecology, and industry.

Genetics: Genetics majors focus on the study of genes, heredity, and genetic variation. You'll learn about inheritance patterns, gene expression, genetic engineering, and genetic diseases. It can lead to careers in research, genetic counseling, or biotechnology.

Environmental Biology: This major concentrates on the study of ecosystems, biodiversity, conservation, and the impact of human activities on the environment. It is an excellent choice if you're passionate about ecology, conservation biology, or environmental science.

Neuroscience: Neuroscience majors delve into the study of the brain, nervous system, and how they influence behavior and cognition. You'll explore areas like neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurochemistry, and neurodevelopment.

Biotechnology: A biotechnology major combines biology with technology and engineering. It focuses on applying biological knowledge to develop new products, processes, and technologies in fields like medicine, agriculture, and industry.

Biochemistry: Biochemistry majors study the chemical processes and molecules that occur within living organisms. It combines elements of biology and chemistry and is crucial for understanding cellular processes and metabolic pathways.

These are just a few examples, and there are many other specialized fields within biology. It's important to consider your interests, career goals, and the opportunities available in each field when choosing a major. Additionally, you can always consult with academic advisors, professors, or professionals in the field to gain more insights and make an informed decision.
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Tara T’s Answer

Science is an amazing field, with biology and medicine often interconnected. Consider exploring careers that combine these two areas or where they intersect. Here's a list of professions where biology and medicine overlap:

- Physician
- Biochemist
- Clinical research associate
- Epidemiologist
- Genetic counselor
- Pharmaceutical marketing
- Medical technologist
- Physical therapist

All of these careers are fantastic options with plenty of opportunities for growth in the scientific field.

I recommend researching the courses required for your top five choices. Once you've identified a college that offers the necessary courses for a successful graduation, look into available grants, scholarships, and financial aid. Additionally, examine the various types of student loans, when repayment begins, and the interest rates. Consider the costs of housing, tuition, commuting, textbooks, laptops, and other expenses. Are there extra fees for lab materials? Remember, college is an investment in your future career, so make wise decisions to minimize financial stress. I hope this information helps, and I wish you the best of luck on your journey.
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