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How can I get job interviews consistently?

I’ve been trying to find my first job for a very long time. I already customize every resume to each job application that I submit. Even though I am looking for my first job, I do have substantial volunteer experience (5 years). I know that job searching is a numbers game, but it doesn’t make sense to me to submit 500 applications for only one to advance me to the interview stage – I’d rather focus my time and energy on crafting my application to get to the interview every time or most of the time. Is there anything I can do to increase my odds of getting a job interview and/or get feedback on why I’m not being considered?

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From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

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Jerome’s Answer

A shocking percentage of jobs are awarded to individuals who have a connection to the role or organization. I am a huge believer in networking and developing mutually beneficial connections. Two out of three of the jobs I have had were the result of connections that offered recommendations.

There are industry specific associations you can join for a targeted approach. Otherwise, take advantage of chambers of commerce or other local groups who host mixers.

I would also circle back to organizations you have volunteered with. If you left a good impression, there may be an opportunity to secure work through one of those organizations, or the individuals who work there may know of jobs that are available through groups that donate or sponsor them. It can be a small world and who you know can go a long way.
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Steward "Tony"’s Answer

I am no rocket scientist, but I have hired hundreds of them and made six figure income doing so.

This resume everyone seems to have an opinion on is not designed to land you a job. It only purpose is to land you an interview. Your wasting too much time constructing new resumes for each position you find only to find that your not selected. It’s because you do not think like a headhunter. I can show why you should think like a head hunter but you must have the desire to truly compete against the hundreds of candidates who also have no idea what a resume should look like, feel like or visually represent.

Steward "Tony" recommends the following next steps:

Your resume needs to be immediately sent out so I suggest you create a MASTER Resume which you keep adding to over time.
The MASTER you never send out because it can get to a few pages. But everything init can match a number of position requirements you will come across in the future requirements you read about.
This hold true for your skill summary, trading summary, awards summary, etc
Cover letters are obsolete as you resume will now have a SUMARRY instead of an OBJECTIVE ( because hiring managers know objective already.
Every job should have a string of bullets start with words similar to Design, Developed, Implemented, Instructed, Audited, Operated, etc etc
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Byron’s Answer

The way to get more interviews is to simply apply to more jobs. The more jobs you apply to the more interviews you will be invited to.

Byron recommends the following next steps:

They way to get job interviews is to simply always be applying to jobs. The more jobs you apply to the more interviews you will be invited to.
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Adrian’s Answer

I suggest continuing to apply for jobs so you can secure as many interviews as possible. If you know people connected to specific jobs, it's a good idea to ask them for a recommendation.
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Kimley’s Answer

Discovering fantastic job prospects starts with creating a strong network in your desired field. Seek out chances to volunteer or participate in shadow and "ride along" programs. A great alternative is attending job fairs, where you can swiftly present your skills and personal traits to potential employers. Most importantly, be ready to apply for the job you desire - even though you might face some setbacks, stay positive! The perfect employer is out there, waiting to find you!
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Kim’s Answer

Megan,

Are you using the standard chronological resume? If yes, I encourage you to develop a Functional resume. In it, you identify three to five skills that you want to highlight, list them, and below each one, list bullet points, then, below the skills section, list your experience (paid or volunteer). I especially like to use this when the position has an on-line application that looks like a chronological resume. Oversimplified, it looks like this: (The beauty of this is you can easily rearrange the skills to list the most important one first - the drawback is they cannot tell which experience you got where, and the ATS software doesn't know how to read it)

SKILLS

Office Management
* Maintain inventory of all supplies, re-ordering as necessary
* Accounts payable and Accounts receivable
* Select and interact with vendors - copier repair, plumbing repair, etc
* Payroll
Technology
* Review and recommend new software
*
*
*
Volunteer Management
* Train new volunteers
* Maintain volunteer records of training and hours worked
*Scheduling

EXPERIENCE
American Red Cross, Abilene, TX 5/2019 to present
Humane Society of Guadalupe County, 6/2018 to 4/2019

Using a functional resume, in conjunction with an on-line application, allows you to market yourself with two different "advertisements," rather than using the same one twice.

Also consider writing cover letters to the jobs you really want!
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Alec’s Answer

Here are a few general tips that may help you get past the initial interview screen:
* Make sure your resume is parsable by Applicant Tracking Software, jobscan.co is a site that can read it and give you feedback.
* List volunteer and do pro-bono projects that are relevant to the industry.
* Go through the employer's career site directly, do not use 3rd party aggregator sites like Indeed, GlassDoor, etc.
* Find people on LinkedIn that work in the field you would like to enter and ask them to critique your resume, lots of people are willing to help out someone new.
* When you do get interviews, take as much time as possible to ask questions and learn what they're looking for.
* Getting coworkers, teachers, or fellow students to leave testimonials and endorse your skills on LinkedIn.
* Practice interviewing out loud, using the STAR method. Even recording yourself and listening back can help you determine where you need improvement!

Please note, all this advice comes from professionals in the tech industry, so it may be less applicable in other industries.
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T.J.’s Answer

Hello Megan!

You are not alone. Many people are facing challenges with applying for jobs right now. A lot of jobs don't provide feedback, either. It's really not you.

If online applications aren't working, you can attempt to find jobs in-person. Specially, through networking.

Search for conferences, workshops, or events near you for the industry you want to work in. Take the time to build connections with people. Focus on building good relationships overtime.

Knowing someone in the industry can open a lot of chances to get hired. Professionals that respect you can share job opportunities and vouch for you during the interview process, especially if it's for the same company they're in.

Instead of asking directly: "Can you get me a job?"
Use this question: "Do you know if anyone's hiring right now for __ type of positions?"

The latter is more broad and less "demanding".

Also, if you have good relationships with people through your volunteer organization(s), reach out to them! See if they can refer you to good positions.

Sending you support with getting work soon :)

T.J. recommends the following next steps:

Here's an article that provides advice for in-person networking | https://www.themuse.com/advice/9-tips-for-navigating-your-first-networking-event
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