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How do you know that the career you chose is the right one for you ?

I’m a bit concerned about the work I’ll do not matching to the salary I’ll receive

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To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

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Wendy’s Answer

Hello Jenni,

You've posed an excellent question! Your career journey is a reflection of your personal ambitions and expectations. As you mature, your mind expands and interests evolve, which can lead to shifts in your career path. This is a natural part of growth and self-discovery.

Take my story for instance. I was drawn to accounting due to my passion for numbers and decided to pursue it academically. However, life had a different plan for me.

I initially embarked on my career in the banking sector, but now, I find myself thriving in one of the leading telecommunication companies. It's a path I hadn't envisioned, but it's been a rewarding journey nonetheless.

Remember, every job you undertake contributes to your skill set and experience. These accumulated skills and experiences are stepping stones, guiding you towards your true professional destiny. So, embrace the journey and let it shape you into the best version of yourself.
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Amanda’s Answer

Hmm, that's a great question! I think there are a couple ways to go about this. Have you considered a minor in something else? That could give you more insight on other potential fields that may be of interest as you continue your major. Also doing simple google searches to look at potential jobs that you may want to pursue is also good. Talking to professors or TAs who have similar majors to yours can also be informative because they are technically a bit "ahead of you" in the path.

I agree with Dino, as salary should not necessarily be the main goal that you want to achieve as you go looking for jobs. Yes, money can be ONE factor but also consider the type of environment, frequency of social interaction, stress, overtime, etc.
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Dino’s Answer

Hello Jenni, thanks for reaching out to us. Your question is a great one! It takes me back to the time before I was a college student. Now, as an adult, I can share insights based on my personal experiences. The key to knowing if you've found the right career is your happiness within it.

Imagine going to work without feeling overwhelmed by your tasks. Picture yourself being content with your work, as if it's a leisurely activity or even a game. Visualize a work environment where you have no issues interacting with your colleagues and superiors. If you can see your work in this positive light, then you've likely found a career that truly suits you.

As for the salary, it's often seen as a reward for your work. Some people find joy in their jobs despite earning a modest income because money isn't their primary motivator. On the other hand, some people earn high salaries but feel stressed due to the pressures and expectations of their work, leading to burnout. Often, these high earners end up leaving their jobs due to the stress.

Indeed, money is a motivator for many in the workforce, but its importance varies based on individual values. Other factors can hold more weight, such as opportunities for growth and development within your company, a pleasant and low-stress work environment, and a love for what you do. Ultimately, the sense of fulfillment and job satisfaction you derive from your work is paramount.
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Amalya’s Answer

Hi Jenni,
There are many ways to find it out. First of all, you should ask yourself whether the work you do makes you glad and satisfied or not. If you don't enjoy the work you do, it's a sign that you should reconsider it. Another point is that you should see your job/career path in the context of your dreams: Do they match or are completely different?
One more aspect: You may be financially satisfied by the career you choose, but money is not the most important aspect of a job. Your occupation must be relevant to your personality traits, professional and academic skills, and so on.
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Keyston’s Answer

I get that concern. For me, the right career felt like a good fit because I found something I enjoyed and was good at. It's not just about the salary, but also about feeling fulfilled and making a difference. Over time, I realized that success comes from passion and dedication, no matter where you start. Good lucky to you buddy, you've got this! Do not get discouraged.
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Shri’s Answer

Hello Jenni,

In a nutshell: Our quest should never cease until we discover our true passion!

As humans, we are perpetual learners. The mantra of life should be to embrace lifelong learning - about ourselves and the world around us.

Understanding what truly motivates you, what brings joy to your heart, and what fuels your drive, are crucial elements to ponder upon.

While financial stability indeed plays a role in our lives, it's essential to maintain a steady income, regardless of your current occupation. However, never stop seeking what genuinely ignites your spirit. Never settle for less.

The moment you stumble upon your true passion, you'll feel it deep within. This is where you can dive deeper, explore further, and nurture your growth.
The crux of the matter - learning is an endless journey!
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Cecile’s Answer

The reality of a career path is that it is always unfolding. The teenaged you will grow and change, along with your preferences, your discoveries about life, and your circumstances.

Not only will you continue to learn more about your first choice in careers, you will learn about yourself, your coworkers, and the setting you are working in. As you continue to build work skills and expertise, you will learn about other career options and make decisions about staying where you are or moving on. The toolbox of soft skills and hard skills we acquire over time can be used in so many different career areas.

We cannot forget other issues around working: trends in the career you choose, deciding whether or not to get more education, finding compatibility with fellow workers and managers, and your evolving value system.

So, always do your best in whatever work you land in, as that can lead to advancement, unexpected networking with other people, as so on.

I do understand that some university expenses that you have to pay back over time may be more than your salary can handle—sometimes that happens, unfortunately. Hopefully, the Biden administration can find a workaround for that one (which is why you should also be a regular voter for politicians who care about citizens and the quality of their lives). Nevertheless, I hope you pursue financial aid, scholarships, internships that provide important connections, that can lead you to not having to worry too much about finances.
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