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What made you pursue this career path? How much do you make in the beginning and how much do you make later on? Does it get easier with experience? How much schooling do you need to start? What internships could you get after schooling and during schooling?

When you get the internship does that help get you an official job at the place you get there or help you get recommended to other places?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Amanda’s Answer

Good evening. Excellent questions.

I did not get my nursing degree untill my mid 30's. Nursing is probably my fifth or so occupation.
A desire to help people is required to be a nurse. Nursing can be the best and worst jobs at the same time. Sometimes finding the "right" postion can take awhile. The hours can be long and sometimes "thankless". If you are good at and like customer service, you will probably love nursing. What I mean by that you are taking care of patients at possibly one of the worst times of their lives and sometimes you have to have thick skin.
I worked psych for awhile and I learned to move fast and duck to avoid getting punched. I have cleaned up every body fluid you can imagine. Nursing can be a very rewarding job however, it is not an easy or glamorus job.
Reading the other posts most of your questions have been answered. Pay with nursing all depends on what type of position you have and where you live.
I started out in 2009 at 22/hr with shift diff. I recently was making 40/hr prn when my pay was cut to 35/hr.
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Char’s Answer

Hi Bea,
Here's the answers to your questions:

What made you pursue this career path?
I'm a registered nurse. I chose the medical field because I wanted to be of service to people who really need it.

How much do you make in the beginning and how much do you make later on?
RNs make about $77,000 a year. After just a few years, you could make a lot more if you go back to college during that time and get a higher nursing degree. A few more years of college can bring you up to $115,000 (even $200,000 for some specialties).

Does it get easier with experience?
Yes. It could take a few years though.

How much schooling do you need to start?
RNs only need an Associates Degree in Nursing, which is the quickest degree you can get (2 years). The only thing is, the classes might be full because a lot of people want to be nurses, so it could take a lot longer to finish.

What internships could you get after schooling and during schooling?
In nursing, internships and externships usually occur while still in school. Residencies occur after graduation. For internships, your nursing school might set one up for you. If not, you can find them by doing a basic internet search. Same with externships and residencies. Here's some resources:
https://nursejournal.org/articles/nurse-extern-vs-intern/
https://nursejournal.org/articles/nurse-residency-programs/

When you get the internship does that help get you an official job at the place you get there or help you get recommended to other places?
Yes it can. A lot of nurses get their first jobs this way.
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Ivy’s Answer

So many solid questions here - and great answers. For me, flexibility and trust in myself have been key to pursuing a successful career path.

I've followed my curiosity throughout my career. I started out in film and TV production, with a hope of going into script development. After years of trying this route (making ~$20-$30K/year in a high COL city), I discovered advertising strategy, which allowed me to combine my interest in popular culture, storytelling and creativity (and have a more steady salary with benefits).

I still check in with myself to make sure I'm finding a good balance between work that sparks my curiosity, pushes my growth and allows me financial security.
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Claxton’s Answer

You've asked a lot of great questions, Bea. As you read my answers, though, please keep in mind that my experience does not involve a straight-line path, and for some people that is not uncommon.

My original college major was civil engineering, but for several different reasons I wound up changing major to communication, with an emphasis on mass communication (e.g., radio, television). While in college, I worked for an electrical utility company, in both their Design Engineering and Corporate Communications divisions. It was not an internship, but real paying work. Had I stayed in civil engineering, I likely would've been hired into a permanent position with that company and probably making at least $30,000 a year starting out, but I suspect that because I changed majors and divisions, they did not have a place for me there. There's no guarantee that a company you intern with or do summer work for on a paid basis will hire you after you get a degree, though a lot of people are fortunate to stay on.

After graduating, I spent six months working temporary jobs before I got my first permanent job, with a small video production and advertising firm. Though my main job was administrative assistant, and earned me much less than $30,000 a year, I also got a chance to do a little work in my major field including writing scripts and doing voiceovers. I spent a year in that job before moving into the financial service industry, spending four years on the credit card document imaging team before taking my current job in our Forms Management department. I've been doing that job for 25 years. I do not have formal training in graphic design in a school setting, but what I did have that made me a good fit for the department was knowledge of envelopes, one of the most common business forms there is, and postal procedures that govern them. I learned much of what I know about graphic design on the job, and that includes taking classes in software such as Adobe InDesign and Adobe Experience Manager. And I suspect I still make much less than a civil engineer with comparable time on the job.
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Sultan’s Answer

Hello Bea.

This is a nice and good thing to ask about. As I've always told my audience, knowing your "Why" should be the first thing to do before you can commence on anything. As for your career that you wanna pursue, the best advice you can get is knowing why you want to do it.

Don't let anyone dictate for you. It's your life and whatever happens will be on you. So know why you want to pursue that career first, know if it will be profitable to you in the long run, know if it's what will make you happy...only then will you know what and how to do it.

And once you've know your "Why" , the next thing to do is stick to it.

You should know this: you will not make good money when you are just starting up. But you shouldn't give up because it will become an experience that will be useful to you later on.

That's all I have for you!

I'm rooting for you.
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Dolores’s Answer

If you are considering a career in healthcare, you have to have an in-depth desire to help others. That is what healthcare is all about. You will want to make sure you like to learn constantly as there are always new evidence-based processes and procedures in healthcare. You need to be good in math and science. You also have to have good reading comprehension and writing skills for your documentation. As for internships, you will have to check around to local hospitals to see what type of internships they have for their staff and for new graduates. Most hospitals only take on the number of interns that are needed to fill positions. As for salary you would start at the base pay for the area you live in. You can always Google average salaries for different positions for your area. As you work in the area you will become more comfortable and competent in your skills and build on your critical thinking skills and clinical judgement skills. Most places provide pay increases over the years. If you go back and get additional degrees in your field that can also affect your pay level. As for internships, while in school, you would have to check with your local facilities to see what options they have for different internship opportunities. I hope that helps as you decide on your future career choices.
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John’s Answer

Bea, you've posed some fantastic inquiries, and I'm eager to respond to them sequentially.

1) My initial interest in the field was driven by a desire for a higher income than I was earning at the time.
2) When I started my career as a nurse straight out of school 25 years ago, I was making $35k. Today, I earn more than three times that amount.
3) With time and experience, the job has become much easier.
4) My educational background includes a 2-year Associate Degree in Nursing.
5) I didn't undertake any nursing internships, as there were—and continue to be—numerous job opportunities and employers ready to hire and train fresh graduates.

From your listed interests, it's clear you're exploring potential career paths and considering what will provide a stable income. I can confidently say that while some people find their career path early on and stick to it, most people's careers evolve over time. So, be open to the possibility that your initial career choice may not be your final one.

Let me share my personal journey as an illustration. I took an unconventional route, leaving college after realizing it wasn't the right fit for me. I spent several years working as a whitewater rafting guide, a job I loved despite the low pay, and it allowed me to live in a tent for months on end. During this time, I took a wilderness EMT course designed for outdoor industry professionals. As part of the course, I spent an 8-hour shift in an ambulance and the ER, which sparked my passion for EMS. I became a paramedic and later pursued nursing school.

I share this story to reassure you that you don't need to decide your lifelong career path right now. One experience often leads to another, opening up new opportunities. If you're keen to explore different paths and have adventures, I encourage you to do so while you're young. If you prefer to focus on your education first, consider programs that align with your passions. Volunteering at a hospital or nursing home could provide valuable insights. If business or marketing interests you, consider speaking with professionals in those fields.

The most valuable advice I can offer is this: find joy in what you do. It makes the daily grind much more bearable. Best of luck on your journey!
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David J.’s Answer

Hi Bea,

Those are great questions, especially since as a young person there are so many different ways to go.

I fell into my career through a summer internship. My aspiration was to do something in law enforcement and prior to the summer of 2004 I was tapped by my mom for a summer internship at her company. I never planned on staying since it was just supposed to fill the gap between semesters in college, but I ended up staying at that company for 18 years.

Do things get easier with experience, yes and no. The more you do something the easier it becomes, yes. However, if you want to push yourself and grow you may find yourself doing other things, even within the same company and perhaps the same role. Learning new things is challenging and can push you to your limit and out of your comfort zone. It's ok to feel that way. Everyone started somewhere.

Pertaining to education, I have a Masters Degree in Leadership. Was this necessary for my career, no, but it certainly helps me. Education is important. Experience is also important. People relationships is most important. College is good experience and collaboration with peers. There is good base knowledge there, at least in the areas of business and with more specific skills like computer science. More experience will come when you start working.

When I first started working, I made $15 per hour during my internship. As I gained more knowledge and experience and took on new responsibilities, the pay scale also grew with me. Many companies will reward employees for completing education milestones. Some companies even have tuition assistance to help their employees grow. Those types of benefits are also important, other than just the salary part.

What also helped my prior to finding a permanent job was using a Temp agency out of high school. This exposed me to the business world in many different assignments and I could work in different areas. I worked as an Admin Assistant at a university for a few months, as well as some longer term assignments in a financial company with leases and loans for commercial equipment. I also had an assignment in a large corporation's law department assisting with government patents.

These experiences helped me to see what I liked in an environment and what I didn't like and when I found something where I felt I was good at it, I chose to stay, even though it was not at all related to what I went to college for (my bachelors degree is in Justice and Law Administration and I have been working in Information Technology for almost 20 years).

Let me know if you have any other questions. I would love to answer them!!
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Jacob’s Answer

Certainly, let's address your questions more broadly, focusing on pursuing a career and how internships can be beneficial:

**1. Choosing a Career Path:**
- To choose a career path, start by assessing your interests, strengths, and passions. Consider what activities or subjects excite you and align with your values.
- Research different careers and industries to understand their requirements, job prospects, and earning potential.
- Seek advice from career counselors, mentors, and professionals in fields you're interested in.

**2. Entry-Level Salaries and Advancement:**
- Entry-level salaries vary widely depending on the career. Some industries offer higher starting salaries than others. Research the average starting salaries in your chosen field to get an idea.
- Earning potential tends to increase with experience, expertise, and career advancement. Many careers offer opportunities for growth and higher incomes over time.

**3. Gaining Experience:**
- Yes, experience often makes tasks easier as you become more familiar with the work and develop skills. It can also open doors to better job opportunities.
- Consider starting in entry-level positions or internships to gain relevant experience in your chosen field.

**4. Educational Requirements:**
- The level of education needed varies by career. Some roles require only a high school diploma or an associate's degree, while others demand bachelor's or advanced degrees.
- Research the educational requirements for your desired career and choose a path that aligns with your goals.

**5. Internships:**
- Internships are invaluable for gaining practical experience, networking, and building your resume.
- Seek internships related to your field of study or career interest. They provide insights into the industry and can help you confirm your career choice.
- Some internships can lead to official job offers with the same company, but it's not guaranteed. However, internships do enhance your resume and can lead to recommendations for future job opportunities.

**6. Building Connections:**
- Use internships as an opportunity to network. Connect with professionals in the industry, attend industry events, and seek out mentorship.
- Building a strong professional network can help you secure job offers, receive recommendations, and learn from experienced individuals.

Remember that career paths are unique, and success often comes with dedication, continuous learning, and adaptability. Don't be afraid to explore different opportunities, and use internships as stepping stones toward your long-term career goals.
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Ellen’s Answer

Hello there! My professional journey sprouted from a deep passion for writing and the entertainment industry. I pursued a degree in journalism with an aspiration to become a news reporter. Along the way, I took up various internships, both paid and unpaid, to explore the many aspects of the field. This helped me understand my preferences and reassess my career goals regularly.

Straight out of college, I landed a three-year internship at a prominent newspaper. This opportunity not only kick-started my career but also helped me establish valuable connections. I utilized this platform to freelance for the newspaper and build my portfolio. They didn't have a permanent job for me, but this eventually led me to secure my dream job in Hollywood as a celebrity reporter at the young age of 24. Although the pay was modest ($27K a year) and the job wasn't highly respected, it was a significant learning experience that fulfilled my youthful dreams.

As I matured, my desire for stability and a long-lasting career grew. I began exploring other industries that could benefit from the skills I had acquired, realizing that my current path could lead to a work-dominated life and rapid burnout. This exploration led me to marketing, a field I had never formally studied.

I'd like to reiterate what others have mentioned: building connections and maintaining them (which is much easier now with LinkedIn) is crucial. View each job as an opportunity to enhance your skills. I would urge you to take risks while you're young. Opt for a job with less pay that offers growth opportunities over a comfortable job that limits your potential. As life progresses and responsibilities like mortgages and families come into play, there will always be time to settle for less risky options (if that's what you want). Use your college years to explore various fields of interest through different classes and clubs. It's an excellent time to experiment.

And remember, LinkedIn can be a powerful tool! I updated my profile with more details about my work, and the very next day, I was contacted about a dream job because someone had searched for specific keywords. I've been with that company for 12 years now and counting.
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