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What are some good colleges (US) to look into in order to pursue a degree in psychology?

Psychology is extremely interesting to me and I think a career in the field could very well be a good fit for me. What are some colleges in the US that offer good psychology programs? Or are they all kind of the same difference? I want to have as much knowledge in the area as I can and actually learn about psychology and mental health.

Thank you comment icon Hello!! Shooting Stars!! Thank you for your Question!! It is pure Genius!! Lightbulb!! Here an idea! Maybe you could check out The US News Best US College Rankings in Psychology !! If you like!! Lightbulb!! Here is another idea!! You might could talk to someone from The American Psychological Association for some help too! Check them out!!! if you like!!! Hope this helps!! Awesome !!! The World would love another Psychologist!! Good Luck!! 馃尀馃尀馃尀馃尀馃尀馃尀馃尀 Shelisa Henley

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Keri鈥檚 Answer

Psychology is a common major at most colleges/universities. With that said, reflect on what you want to do with your psychology degree and then when you are looking at colleges/universities, learn about the professors and what their areas of research/focus are. All professors are listed on the school's website, typically under faculty. There are so many career paths you can take with a psychology career. I initially started out wanting to be a child psychologist, so i picked a school that focused more on counseling rather than research. I applied my psychology degree and counseling skills learned in college to a master's degree in High Education Administration and focused on Career counseling. After several years of doing career counseling in the college setting, i wanted to earn a higher salary so I pivoted my skills to corporate and now I work in Human Resources. My corporate job has a large counseling/advising component to it.
When selecting a college/university, pick one where you feel "at home" because it will be your home for several years, whether you live there or not. :)
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the advice, Keri! Adilay
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James Constantine鈥檚 Answer

Hi there, Adilay!

If you're dreaming of earning a degree in psychology, you're in luck! The United States is home to a plethora of colleges and universities that offer top-notch programs in this fascinating field. But remember, it's not just about picking any school - it's about finding the right fit for you. Factors to think about include the expertise of the faculty, opportunities for research and internships, available resources, and the overall reputation of the school.

1. Harvard University:
First up, we have Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. This prestigious institution is famous for its robust psychology program. At Harvard, you'll find a broad spectrum of courses that delve into various psychology subfields, like cognitive neuroscience, social psychology, clinical psychology, and developmental psychology, among others. The faculty members are leaders in their research areas, and the state-of-the-art facilities and research labs offer plenty of opportunities for hands-on learning. Harvard's psychology program is challenging and competitive, but it's a fantastic choice for those who are truly passionate about psychology.

2. Stanford University:
Next, let's head over to Stanford, California, home to Stanford University. Known for its excellent psychology program, Stanford offers a well-rounded curriculum that combines theoretical knowledge with practical skills. The faculty members are accomplished researchers who actively contribute to the field of psychology. Plus, with various labs and centers dedicated to different areas of psychology, students have ample opportunities for research. And let's not forget the unique opportunities for collaboration and exposure to cutting-edge technologies, thanks to the university's location in Silicon Valley.

3. University of California, Berkeley:
Last but not least, the University of California, Berkeley is renowned for its strong focus on research and academic excellence in psychology. The department offers a diverse range of courses, from cognitive psychology and behavioral neuroscience to social psychology and clinical science. The faculty members are leaders in their fields and are actively involved in groundbreaking research. Students at UC Berkeley can get involved in research projects, internships, and fieldwork, giving them practical experience and a chance to contribute to the field of psychology.

While Harvard, Stanford, and UC Berkeley are often hailed as top-tier institutions for psychology, there are many other fantastic colleges and universities across the United States. Some other noteworthy mentions include Yale University, University of Michigan, University of Pennsylvania, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and University of Wisconsin-Madison.

When it comes to choosing a college for your psychology degree, it's important to do your homework. Look into each institution's specific program offerings, faculty expertise, research opportunities, internship placements, and available resources. Also, think about factors like location, campus culture, class sizes, and extracurricular activities that match your interests and goals. Don't forget to visit campuses or attend virtual information sessions to get a feel for the learning environment and community.

Remember, while the colleges mentioned are highly respected for their psychology programs, the most important thing is to find a college that aligns with your personal needs and aspirations. Do thorough research, talk to current students or alumni, and make sure you find the right fit for you.

Top 3 Authoritative Reference Publications or Domain Names Used:
1. U.S. News & World Report - Education Rankings (www.usnews.com)
2. The Princeton Review - Best Colleges for Psychology (www.princetonreview.com)
3. College Board - BigFuture (bigfuture.collegeboard.org)
Thank you comment icon This will be a good place for me to start my college research, thank you! Adilay
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James Constantine鈥檚 Answer

Hey there, Adilay!

If you're keen on becoming a psych technician, there are a number of steps you can take to boost your chances of landing a job in this important field. Psych technicians, also known as psychiatric technicians or mental health technicians, play a key role in helping mental health professionals care for people with mental illnesses or disorders. They work in a range of places like hospitals, psychiatric facilities, residential treatment centers, and community mental health centers.

Education and Training:
1. Learn about the Field: Start off by getting to know the role of a psych technician. Understand the job's responsibilities and requirements. This will help you see if it matches your interests and career goals.
2. Finish High School: First, finish your high school education or get a GED equivalent. Pay attention to subjects like psychology, biology, sociology, and health sciences to build a base of knowledge for this field.
3. Further Education: While it's not always required, completing a post-high school program can really boost your job chances. Think about getting an associate's degree or certificate in psychiatric technology or mental health technology. These programs usually cover things like psychology, human behavior, therapeutic techniques, pharmacology, and crisis intervention.
4. Licensing and Certification: Depending on where you plan to work, you might need to get a license or certification as a psychiatric technician. Make sure to check the specific requirements of your state's licensing board or regulatory agency.

Gaining Experience:
1. Internships and Volunteering: Look for chances to get hands-on experience in mental health. Reach out to local hospitals, psychiatric facilities, or community organizations that offer mental health services to ask about internships or volunteer positions. This will let you learn from professionals and show your dedication to the field.
2. Job Shadowing: Get in touch with psych technicians who are already working and ask to shadow them for a day or a few hours. This will give you a real-life view of the daily tasks and responsibilities of the job.
3. Networking: Go to professional conferences, workshops, or seminars about mental health to meet professionals in the field. Making connections can lead to job chances or helpful recommendations.

Job Search and Application:
1. Resume and Cover Letter: Create a strong resume and cover letter that show off your education, training, and experience. Make sure your application materials highlight your understanding of mental health, your ability to work in a team, and any important certifications or licenses.
2. Job Boards and Websites: Use online job boards and websites that focus on mental health job listings. Some good platforms include Indeed, LinkedIn, Glassdoor, and CareerBuilder. Set up job alerts to get notified when new jobs are posted.
3. Professional Organizations: Join professional groups like the American Association of Psychiatric Technicians (AAPT) or the National Association of Psychiatric Health Systems (NAPHS). These groups often offer resources, job boards, and networking opportunities just for the field of psychiatric technology.

Keep in mind that the exact requirements for becoming a psych technician can change depending on the state or country you live in. It's important to check and follow the rules set by your local licensing board or regulatory agency.

Top 3 Authoritative Reference Publications/Domain Names:
1. American Association of Psychiatric Technicians (AAPT) - www.psychtechs.net
2. National Association of Psychiatric Health Systems (NAPHS) - www.naphs.org
3. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) - www.bls.gov
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this will be useful. Adilay
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Martha鈥檚 Answer

Hi, Adilay - this is an excellent question, and you have received excellent advice. I would like to reiterate Keri's suggestion that a strong Psychology major be one criterion, but not the only one, for choosing a college/university. Lehna also made a good point about possible undergraduate/graduate programs so you could gain both degrees in less time.

I would also like to add investigating research opportunities for undergrads (some have these primarily for graduate students) as well as help finding internships in your field.

Good luck!
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the advice, I'll consider those things. Adilay
Thank you comment icon You're welcome! Martha Kramer
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Charlie鈥檚 Answer

According to US News and World Report a number of schools offer degrees in Psychology.

Here is a link to the list

https://www.usnews.com/best-colleges/psychology-major-4201?schoolType=national-universities&_sort=rank&_sortDirection=asc
Thank you comment icon Thank you! Adilay
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Lehna鈥檚 Answer

There are several schools that would be great for programs like this. You can get your psychology bachelors from any school you'd like then I would suggest you find a program similar to Johns Hopkins or GWU that offer dual degree programs. Some other schools offer dual degree programs for bachelors and masters programs too so that's always a good option if you are sure this your calling!
Thank you comment icon This is helpful, thank you. Adilay
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