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Advice for someone with a strong passion for the creative industry without being good in Art previously?

I have a very strong inclination towards advertising, graphic design, photography and videography, and other art forms. Yet, I have not obtained the best grades in Art during school.

Does that mean that I am not creative or can't survive in the creative industry?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Garima’s Answer

Good grades in school art classes are not a permanent indicator of anyone's potential in the art industry.

School art focuses more on technical skills and academic criteria.

The art industry values creativity, innovation, and practical application of skills in real-world contexts.

Creativity is distinctive and varies from person to person. Your unique perspective and passion for advertising, graphic design, and other art forms are valuable assets.

Direct your energy towards your interests. Whether it's advertising, graphic design, photography, or videography, pursue what excites you.

Take advantage of online courses to expand your skills and knowledge in your chosen field.

If advertising is your passion, explore different types such as hyper-casual ads or large-scale productions to find what resonates with you.

Platforms like LinkedIn offer valuable insights into current trends and networking opportunities within the creative industry.

Start networking early to build connections with professionals and peers who can offer guidance and collaboration opportunities.

Create meaningful projects to showcase your skills. A portfolio is crucial as it demonstrates your abilities and creativity to potential employers or clients.

In the art industry, portfolios are often the deciding factor in hiring decisions. Focus on creating a portfolio that highlights your best work and reflects your creative vision.

By focusing on your passions, continuously learning, networking proactively, and building a strong portfolio, you can position yourself for success in the creative industry.

Best of luck in your journey.

Garima recommends the following next steps:

Focus on your passion.
Learn about the field or company you want to work in.
Join Design Communities.
Build your Portfolio.
Start Networking early.
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Richard’s Answer

Hello! The fact that you didn't get good grades in school is irrelevant. It means almost nothing except your efforts weren't regarded as "good" compared to some arbitrary standard. If I were you, I wouldn't put a lot of faith in other's abilities to judge your efforts. The biggest challenge for many artists is not allowing the inner critic to judge efforts. In this case, your inner critic took the form of somebody in a position of
"authority." Whether the critic is "in there" or "out there," keep offering the world your efforts.

Richard recommends the following next steps:

Read The Artist's Way
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Judith-Ann’s Answer

Hello, Yew Kin. There is an old saying that I totally agree with: "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder." It is true in every art form. Your teachers may not see beauty in your creations, but do you? According to the dictionary: "Creativity is a characteristic of someone or some process that forms something new and valuable. The created item may be intangible or a physical object. Scholarly interest in creativity is found in a number of disciplines, primarily psychology, business studies, and cognitive science." I would like to emphasize that creativity enhances every discipline of life. I, as counselor, believe that my sessions with my clients are enhanced by my creativity.

I think you are probably a very creative person in search of projects that allow you to express your heart. So I ask you: what is in your heart? Draw it, paint it, write about it, sing about it, speak about it. Honestly, some viewers of your heart will relate and others will not. You really can't control how others see or hear or relate to your creativity. You can only be honest and authentic with yourself and let your inner creativity soar!

Let your creativity fly. Let your creativity climb to the mountain top and sail the oceans. Most of all let your creativity laugh and enjoy life.
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Reiko’s Answer

Hi!
There are many ways to have a career in a creative industry. In the areas of marketing and advertising, data has to be gathered to create the best campaign. Analytics then becomes just as important as the "creative" piece of the process. Fields such as UX/UI Design and Immersive Media are an excellent balance of technical and creative skills. Those fields are highly valuable in multiple industries. Everyday, the line is being blurred between creative and technical professionals. Art techniques can be taught, but having vision is equally as important. Remember, art is subjective and keep seeking ways to use your assets in creative arenas.
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Natalie’s Answer

Yew, I love your question!

I currently do a lot of graphic design work in my job, and my degrees are actually in English and Literature! I don't have any art degrees, and I never took any classes in art or graphic design!

I loved drawing, doodling, and painting when I was younger, and I've always been creative, but that wasn't the path I took in school at all. I went a different route, but along the way, I learned some graphic design software on my own and made things for fun or for people I knew. I saved a lot of what I had done and was able to put it together in a portfolio. I used those examples to land the job I'm in now where I get to create logos, design entire learning courses, make flyers, design websites, etc. I know a ton of people that are more talented than I am, but they didn't put themselves out there so they didn't land the kind of job I did. It's not about how good you are - it's about not being afraid to try!

There is no one path that fits everyone. If you want to do something, do it! I wish you all the best on your journey!
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Jennifer’s Answer

How passionate are you about joining that industry? Remember, the past is just that - the past. Even if your grades weren't stellar, it's not a big deal. If your sights are now set on a creative field and you're clear about your goals, it's time to dive in and give it your all.

Honestly, in my opinion, grades lose their significance once you step into the professional world, especially in creative fields. What truly matters is how you showcase yourself and your work. Maintaining a strong work ethic is essential, always. But if your performance in a high school or college class wasn't the best because your professor didn't quite understand your unique style, that's perfectly fine.
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Michelle’s Answer

Hello, Yew Kin !

As for your question regarding if you can "survive" and are you "creative" enough for the art world, only you can make that decision based on how strongly you want to be in the art world. Although it's difficult to answer that question without seeing your work, I'd like to give you some advice and encouragement.

I would take the feedback you've received at school as either constructive feedback or take it with a grain of salt. Art is opinion based with some basic techniques, but school has given you negative feedback thus far. Many, many prominent fine artists and performing artists were told that they'd never have a career, they have no talent and than went on to prove the naysayers wrong. You will have to tap into what makes you creative, what drives your passion for the creative media and apply it to your work. It sounds like you didn't really have the best teachers. Please do not be discouraged.

There is a lot to learn about all of the art forms that you've mentioned. You will need to study them more and hopefully college will be a better route for you than high school. Keep taking classes in those subjects and join groups, clubs and the activities that will prompt you to practice your art. The creative fields require strong dedication - tenacity, planning and actively being engaged in them. Every day. Art is an opinion based field of work and not everyone is going to like your work. Than again, there will be many who love your creations, so it's just part of the occupation. You will always get a wide range of opinions. What matters is that people should be teaching you with their opinion, not discouraging you or making you foster self-doubt.

My advice is to go to an art school that offers programs in your creative interests and possibly get a degree in one of them. For now, keep taking classes in high school (if that's where you are now) and read books, websites and watch videos about how to do the art and practice it every single day. The more experience you have, the better and more natural you will feel. See if you can get involved some way with any art galleries, video productions or museums in your area. Even if you have to volunteer your services it will give you great experience and possibly beneficial contacts so you can learn more and meet people in the art world.

Do not give up. You have a lot of time ahead of you and no one should make you believe that you cannot do it. Every famous, successful person has been in your shoes. Develop the skills you have now and want to have in the future and do not allow anyone to stop you.

I hope that this has helped a little and wish you all the best as you continue in the arts !
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Vi’s Answer

Hi Yew Kin - The art/design field is very subjective, whether you do well or not also depends on the type of job you are looking for. For example, a designer for sports illustrations will be very different from a designer for food products. My advice is to keep your options open while pursuing education and career in the art/design field. Take classes that provide skills in graphic design, videography, as well as 3D modeling, sound editing, web design/development, etc. From my personal experience when I graduated with a graphic design degree and worked as a web designer, the job was very different than what I imagined and required not only creative skills, but also technical skills. Remember there's a place for everyone, finding where you fit is crucial.
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