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Should I transfer from a private university to a public one?

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Right now I'm at a private university, and it's so ridiculously expensive. I love my school, I do, but is it really worth it to be in so much debt? Should I just try to transfer to a bigger, public university where I wouldn't be having to pay so much? #money #college-transfer #college #financial-planning #financial-aid #student-debt

As someone who did just the opposite, I would say it depends. If you do truly love your university, and are not too sure about giving it up - maybe talk to your university's business office or your major's department about scholarships and other opportunities that you can pursue to help lessen the dept. Does your university offer majors, programs or opportunities that you cannot get elsewhere? What is your year? Will you be sad to leave it behind? What universities would you consider transferring to, and do you know if they will accept the credits you have gained while at this one? That last question is exceptionally important if you decide to leave, as most of the headaches that transfer students deal with are in the credits transfer. Ashley H. Translate
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Katie’s Answer

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Hi Rebecca! Good question! My biggest piece of advice is that college is what you make of it. I went to a small, private, liberal arts school and one of my best friends went to a large, public, state university and at the end of the day we both loved our schools and had similar experiences.


Given that, it is important to consider the environment you work well in. For me, I am pretty shy and quiet, if I had gone to a large school, I think I might have gotten lost in the crowd and I don't know that I would have become the person I am now. Going to a small school helped me to grow in an environment I felt comfortable in. The smaller class sizes made it easier to get help/attention from my professors and build relationships with them. It also helped build relationships with people who were in my major who helped me through college in study groups and people I have kept in contact with for potential job opportunities and such. The small student body helped me to get to know people quickly and develop friendships that will last and again opened up opportunities for networking and jobs. Further, at my school we had a strong sense of community that included our alumni who would constantly reach out to help us find and get jobs.


These were things that I don't know that I would have had the same experience/opportunity with at a large school. Not saying they aren't available at large schools but they might be harder to find and may have more competition. That also said, people recognize large school names which can also help when applying for jobs. Large companies often recruit at these large schools and many large schools are involved with special projects or have special research opportunities.


Right now I work for a large company and I work with people who went to a small private college and people who went to a large public university. We all ended up in the same place and most of us thought college was the best four years of our lives. But each of us are different, some are more aggressive in seeking out opportunities and outgoing and others are more quiet in our working style and reserved. Both types have equal amount of success in my job.


Over all, both are great options and you can get where you want to go from either place but its about what is best for you. College debt is not fun but with the end goal being a job after college you will be able to pay off the loans.

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Aaron’s Answer

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I would say it depends on your overall motives and what you are studying. If you are studying something at your private university that is in demand and pays well, then I would say stick! If you are studying something niche, or does not have significant salary history, or upward trajectory, then you might be right in asking "is it worth it"? I agree with the comment above, that your experience is what you make of it, and overall it really depends on what you study.

If you are studying social services, for example, and your education costs 6 figures, that may not be ideal, as I understand social services while rewarding to those that choose that field, are definitely not making a ton of money. So, really, I would make a list of pros and cons and see where it ends up, and ultimately it may just boil down to cost. Hope this helps, good luck to you!
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