4 answers

How do you know which college choice would be best for your career path, but that would also benefit you with many different circumstances in the long run?

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Since I was little, I had a dream of getting accepted into the college of my choice, but realized that as I got older, my dream became more realistic and I soon came to the conclusion that it may not be possible to get into that college. That is where I started to discover and read about other colleges and schools that are best for different career paths and choices. When it comes down to it, how will we know if we are making the right choices on our schooling decisions, and if it will hurt or help us in the long run of it all?
#college-advice #future #careerpath #career-choice

4 answers

Shulin’s Answer

Updated
Hi Skylar, I am a Malaysian. I wanted to study aboard in Germany, but I went to Taiwan. Later on, I wanted to study graduate school in US, but I enrolled in Taiwan again. When the time I gave up to go to US, decided to get my Ph.D. degree in Taiwan, I dropped the course and moved to Japan. I got a Ph.D. and preparing to move to another country (it's still not US!!!) in a few months to start my new job. Does it sound like a sad story to you? I never knew was that a right choice. I wish there's an answer book that I can check, though. Will that hurt in a long run? I think you are the only one who can answer that. Life, memory, experience, are priceless. We trying so hard to do every step so carefully, just to land a job. A good one. In the meantime, do you enjoy it? Do you enjoy the life? Do you prefer "work to live" or "live to work"? Smile.
Updated
Hello, Shulin. Thank you for answering back on this. Studying abroad sounds amazing and is one of my dreams. It sounds like you had a lot of "back and forth" going on, though. I guess that you're right, when it comes down to it I will have to make that decision on my own. I prefer to "work to live" rather then "live to work." This has really opened my eyes! Thank you for this information and advice, it helps more than you think! I wish you all the best with your new job! The transition may be hard, but it sounds like you have had a lot of experiences along your ways, and it sounds like you'll be able to handle and cope with this new experience just fine. :)
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Anytime. I am glad that help. Thank you and wish you all the best!

G. Mark’s Answer

Updated

I'm going to repeat a familiar refrain of mine because I find it tremendously useful. Then I'll get into the "long run" aspect of your question.

First, take a Personality Assessment Survey test. This is a questionnaire that will match your personality profile to folks who are happy and successful in many different careers. I always tell my students that you tend to be good at what you enjoy and you tend to enjoy what you're good at. And this benefits everyone -- you and everyone around you that is affected by what you do.

Second, "long run" is something you'll have to imagine yourself. As you go through all the possible careers suggested to you by a test like RIASEC (A PAS test of one sort), you can imagine all the turns your life and history may take and then estimate the probability of each circumstance. Like, what if you might make a great fisherman but will probably move to Arizona, as a simplistic example.

Third, you'll want to place more significance on any particular college's availability of courses in your preferred field rather than how well-known the college is. Great use of lesser resources is better than poor use of great resources. And note that your choice of career should NOT be limited to those taught in college. There are many trade schools and areas of skill outside college that are in short supply these days, and may very well show up on your list of PAS-test recommended careers. So be happy!

Joe’s Answer

Updated
The money it takes to go to college is a lot. Don't be afraid of going to a lesser-name school. Most employers will care more about your ability to do well in school and less about which school it was. See if you can do some follow-alongs in the career track you want to pursue and let that help you get a sense for what you will be doing in that job. Community college is not a bad choice when you're still feeling out what you want to do.

Kim’s Answer

Updated

Hi Skylar,

You have been given some excellent advice already. My only other advice (to build on what Joe said) is to consider a junior college to get your basic classes first - same classes less money. That will give you some time to research the right institution for your major as well as stats on placement/internships after you graduate. You may find the next two years more rewarding when you have a clear path at the right institution. And it's easier to research higher education when you are part of it and have some experience to build upon. Best of luck in whatever path you take.