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How do you know the difference between risk taking and making rash decisions when choosing a college?


When looking at my college options, I understand that I have big dreams. I want to be a successful political journalist who attends a serious and respectable school. Looking back, I don't want to regret not pursuing oppurtunities and not taking risks. However, now I am in a cross road. Do I venture out of state and attend a college that will leave me in significant debt or do I play it smart and stay home, attending a local college. At what point do you cross the line between rewardful risk taking and reckless decision making? #college #dreams #risk-taking #future #university #professional #decision-making


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Raven’s Answer

Hey Lovebug,


So I can completely identify with the feelings you are battling with now and honestly the one thing you don't want to do is regret anything concerning your college years. So lets take it slow, first I'm going to tell you what my high school professor told me (that sticks with me even now as a graduate) it's not where you start it's where you finish. So if you decide to attend a local school thats fine it doesn't put at risk your dream of going to a successful, respectable school that will push your career path. Two: You do not have to sacrifice attending an out of state school because there are many forms of FA (financial aid) that is offered at an undergrad level that i want you to take full advantage of. Look into the schools your interested in and see if they offer scholarships/ scholarship programs (many do!) apply, go for it and see what happens. Also venture into their FA packages and take advantage of those programs as well, colleges and universities have programs such as EOP. I am a EOP student and it honestly was the best thing that ever happened for me, I'm beyond pleased I applied for the program, it helped with my books, gave me advising on classes and offer great FA options. Third: It is extremely important to visit the campuses of the colleges you're interested in, I can not stress this enough, this will determine the choice you make heavy. Once you're there you'll know what you want to do and if you want to attend, you'll feel it! I promise this makes all the difference! Lastly the fine line in when you make abrupt decisions, college is a big deal don't settle for anything that doesn't feel right. Keep me up to date and if you need anything else please don't hesitate to hit me up!

Raven recommends the following next steps:

Scholarships.com
Research FA programs
Visit college campuses

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Kimberly’s Answer

I would definitely look into schools that you are interested in and see what kind of financial aide you can possibly obtain. My son received significantly more money from a private college in scholarships and aide, vs the state school. We made a spreadsheet with the costs (tuition, books, room/board) and aide (grants, scholarships, work study, etc.) Once you receive your package from the school, keep asking if there is anymore available, especially close to Decision Day. (As student decline, those scholarship become available.)

Don't waste your time and money applying to schools you really wouldn't want to go to. Our guidance counselor said 5 is sufficient; over ten you need to take time to reconsider what you really want.

The local community colleges around here are now developing relationships with 4-year institutions. Otherwise if you are considering starting a community college, see what course the 4-year institutions will accept. You can potentially save a lot of money, and still obtain your dream diploma.

No matter where you go, employers are looking for well rounded individuals. They are also looking for internship and work experience, and volunteer participation. Look to see what type of opportunities and organizations are available.

Best of luck!

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Nick’s Answer

It can't be denied that people with degrees from expensive schools have some advantages. However, as a hiring manager I am more interested in the fact that a person has put in the effort to complete their education, especially under less than ideal conditions. If financial aid closes the gap, then fine. But you must complete the degree, even if it takes night school or extra time. Good employers look for hard working people with a commitment to a field. You should study a field where you have some talent. An employer would have confidence that investing in on the job training will improve your expertise and performance.

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Bob’s Answer

For an undergraduate degree it usually makes sense to go to a college that is affordable. An out of state or private school may be affordable if you are given a significant scholarship. Good grades, SAT scores, being well rounded, or being an exceptional athlete are ways to increase your chances of receiving scholarship money.

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Bob’s Answer

For an undergraduate degree it usually makes sense to go to a college that is affordable. An out of state or private school may be affordable if you are given a significant scholarship. Good grades, SAT scores, being well rounded, or being an exceptional athlete are ways to increase your chances of receiving scholarship money.

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