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What is an essay format that could make my writing sound more convincing ?

Please be specific on format.

Thank you comment icon My suggestion is to get a copy of "50 Successful Harvard Application Essays" and you can learn a lot from the excellent essays. Each essay in the book comes with an analysis, which show you its good points. Wishing you gain good essay skills. TJ Xia

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Deborah’s Answer

A persuasive essay format typically includes an introduction with a clear thesis statement, followed by several body paragraphs that each present a single point supported by evidence or examples. Each paragraph should start with a topic sentence, followed by supporting details and analysis. Transitional phrases should be used to smoothly connect ideas between paragraphs. Finally, a conclusion should summarize the main points and restate the thesis, leaving a lasting impression on the reader. This structured format helps organize your arguments effectively and makes your writing more convincing by providing a logical flow of ideas and evidence.
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Adewole’s Answer

Essay is fact written down by the writer indicating it main point and also convincing enough to the reader.
Before starting an essay, understand the topic you are writing on. Jot down the clues aside and follow the rules of an essay writing which includes;
✓ Introduction: It used to draw the attention of the reader.
✓ Body: Main points are discussed here and can be 3 paragraph bodies.
✓ Conclusion: Giving the final recommendation.
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Sarah’s Answer

In addition to the advice already provided, I always like to include some form of storytelling and persuasion. How does the topic affect the audience (the people reading your essay)? What action do you want the audience to take? How do you want them to react? Think about WIIFM - what's in it for me (from the audience perspective). You got this!
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Patrick’s Answer

Mallory, I appreciate your interest in learning how to craft persuasive essays. I trust the following guidelines will offer valuable insights.

To write a persuasive essay, you need more than just strong arguments; it's essential to have a clear structure that presents your thoughts in a logical, easy-to-follow manner. Here's a recommended essay structure to boost the power of your writing:

1. Start your essay with an intriguing introduction that immediately captures the reader's interest and sets the stage for your topic. Use a hook - an interesting fact, a provocative question, or a relevant quote - to draw your reader in. Follow this with some background information about your topic and a clear, concise thesis statement that outlines your main argument. This thesis will guide the rest of your essay.

2. The main body of your essay should be made up of multiple paragraphs, each presenting a different argument or point that supports your thesis. Start each paragraph with a sentence that introduces its main idea. Follow this with evidence, examples, and analysis to back up your point. Use linking words and phrases to ensure a smooth flow of ideas from one paragraph to the next. Don't forget to address any potential counterarguments and refute them with solid evidence to bolster your position.

3. To make your writing more persuasive, use credible evidence such as statistics, research findings, expert opinions, or real-life examples. But remember, it's not enough to just present evidence - you need to analyze and explain it to show how it supports your thesis and why it's persuasive to your readers.

4. Show that you've considered all sides of the argument by acknowledging opposing viewpoints and addressing potential counterarguments in your essay. This not only strengthens your argument but also shows your ability to think critically about the topic. Present counterarguments in a fair and unbiased manner, then refute them with evidence and reasoning.

5. Wrap up your essay by summarizing your main arguments and reinforcing your thesis. Avoid introducing new ideas in the conclusion; instead, focus on bringing your points together and leaving a lasting impression on the reader. Restate your thesis in a new way, highlighting the importance of your argument and its wider implications. You might also suggest areas for further research or action related to your topic.

By adhering to this structured essay format, you can present your ideas effectively, argue convincingly, and make your writing more compelling to your readers. Always strive for clarity, coherence, and persuasiveness in your essay, and don't forget to revise and edit thoroughly to ensure your message is clearly conveyed.
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Pallavi’s Answer

Hi! A great method to use is the STAR method.

Situation: Set the scene and give the necessary details of your example.
Task: Describe what your responsibility was in that situation.
Action: Explain exactly what steps you took to address it.
Result: Share what outcomes your actions achieved.
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Josef’s Answer

Look up the Minto pyramid method, this is how most business writing is conducted to get your point across. Instead of doing the traditional structure of giving the details that lead to answer you state your answer first and give the supporting details after. It comes off a lot easier to read, hope this helps.
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Adrienne’s Answer

The best format to use would be the persuasive essay format. A persuasive essay contains 3 key elements.

1) Introduction - The introduction includes a hook, background, and a thesis statement.

2) Body paragraphs - Your body paragraphs contain the argument and evidence, counterarguments, and transition sentences.

3) Conclusion - Your conclusion should include the restatement of the thesis statement, a summary of key points, and a call to action or final thought.
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Adrienne’s Answer

A good hook line in the introduction then follow that up with answers to questions that you may have throughout the body
In the end leave the readers wanting more.

Adrienne recommends the following next steps:

A good hook line in the introduction should be helpful.
The body should in my opinion consist of answers to known questions, or questions you would have on the subject.
The ending should leave the reader wanting more.
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Tom’s Answer

Don't try to reinvent the wheel on this one, at least not until you've become an expert in one subject or another. Introduction, Body, Conclusion. From that point on, anything else you need should fall in line with an outline that's written BEFORE you understand what you want to write. An essay is not a tough assignment, so there's no need to turn it into one. Beginning, Middle, End, keep it simple and keep it reasonable. Introduce your topic, get your point/arguments across, and then wrap it all up at the end.
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Ann-Marie’s Answer

Hi Mallory,
Persuasive essay without a doubt.
But keep in mind: in order to persuade, you must build an argument, so be certain to use valid logic.
The logic must be thorough. At minimum, an argument must contain at least two pieces to combine and reach the conclusion. So it will not be "If A then B."
For example, if it is raining, then I get wet. NO. Well, maybe because I have an imagination. But is anyone persuaded?
Better: If it is raining and I am outside, then I get wet. Ok, more likely, and technically correct but are we really convinced? Not in an essay.
Better still: If it is raining and I am outside and I have no umbrella, then I get wet. Sounds reasonable.
Better than that: If it is raining and I am outside and I have no umbrella and I'm standing in the middle of the street shoeless and without my jacket or hat, then I get wet.
You want a variation of "If A + B + C + D + not E + not F, then G." Remember, at a minimum, If A + B then C, but you see how weak that is.
Test your argument in that manner and you will see whether it is valid or not. Your test can become your outline once you've nailed the elements. Choose the right elements--I didn't include traffic patterns or streetlights or how many leaves were on the trees to my argument above-- and they will inevitably lead to your point and your reader's agreement with you.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Subject: Crafting a Persuasive Essay: A Comprehensive Guide to Convincing Writing

Hello Mallory,

Creating a persuasive essay that resonates with your readers and convinces them of your viewpoint requires a strategic approach. Here's an easy-to-follow format that can help you structure your essay for maximum impact:

Introduction:

1. Hook your readers: Begin with a captivating statement or a fascinating fact that grabs immediate attention.
2. Set the stage: Provide necessary background information about your topic to help your readers understand the context.
3. Declare your stance: Clearly articulate your thesis statement, which is the crux of your argument.

Body Paragraphs:

1. Recognize opposing views: Start each paragraph by acknowledging counterarguments. This shows that you respect different viewpoints and have considered them.
2. Back your argument: Use robust evidence, real-life examples, reliable statistics, or expert quotes to bolster your argument. Ensure that your evidence is both credible and pertinent.
3. Connect the dots: After presenting your evidence, explain its significance and how it supports your thesis. This keeps your essay focused and coherent.

Counterarguments and Rebuttals:

1. Address opposition: Allocate a portion of your essay to directly tackle counterarguments. Debunk these arguments by providing logical reasoning and solid evidence.
2. Offer rebuttals: Present rebuttals that demonstrate why your stance holds more weight than the counterarguments. Anticipate potential objections and prepare persuasive responses.

Conclusion:

1. Recap your arguments: Summarize the key points made in your essay.
2. Reiterate your stance: Restate your thesis in a compelling manner to reinforce your argument.
3. Leave a lasting impression: Conclude with a powerful statement or a call to action that resonates with your readers.

By adhering to this structured format, you can effectively organize your thoughts, present persuasive arguments, tackle counterarguments, and ultimately, create a compelling and convincing essay.

Top 3 Credible Sources Used in Crafting this Guide:

1. Texas Adolescent Literacy Academies (TALA) Writing Professional Development
2. Chapter 10 - Persuasion from College English Course Material
3. Educational Resources on Persuasive Essay Writing

May God bless you!
James Constantine Frangos.
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