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If I'm certain about a career path when should I start looking at schools that offer the major that ties into the career?

I'm a high school student very interested in Biomedical Engineering and I don't know when I should start looking at schools that provide the major for Biomedical Engineers.

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Emily’s Answer

It is never too early to research colleges. Start by looking up colleges or universities that are known for offering good programs in the subject you want to study. Check if they have the specific major you're interested in.

If you can, visit the campuses of the schools you like that has the college majors that you want to pursue. This will help you see what the environment is like, check out the buildings and facilities, and get a sense of what the campus life is all about. You can also research the class sizes, types of classes offered at the school, and employment opportunities after one graduates from the school.

Talk to the people in charge of admissions at the schools you're thinking about. They can tell you more about the programs they offer, what you need to get in, and if there are any scholarships or financial help available. You can also talk to some of the students about the school. Good luck!
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Jeff’s Answer

Hi Myrick,

You can start looking into schools at any point in your high school career, but it would be more relevant to start during your Junior Year and it is the most meaningful a couple months before college app season. Not every school will offer a BME program so the sooner you are aware of this information, the better.

https://www.usnews.com/best-colleges/biomedical-engineering-major-1405

You might need to double check the schools just in case this list wasn't populated correctly.
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Kyle’s Answer

It is never too early to explore and visit campuses. As a general rule, your Junior year of high school is a very pivotal year in your college search journey where you will be completing many applications.
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Aarushi’s Answer

Hi! I recommend looking into schools as soon as possible. I personally did a pro con list as I was researching schools. This helped me be less stressed during my senior year of high school and narrow which schools I want to apply to. I would also recommend meeting with guidance counselors and admissions representatives to understand how the school is.
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Jeff’s Answer

Hi Myrick! I'm really glad you found your interest in Biomedical Engineering at such a young age. Echoing a lot of the messages above. But I also want to add the importance of keeping an open mind and not pigeon hold yourself towards a particular path. A lot of professionals in today's society study in something that has no relevance to their current role and that's okay. It's okay to not know what you want to do at such a young age. I highly recommend that once you get into your dream university, take that first year and consider taking classes you have no knowledge in and want to learn more about. It might provide more insight to what else is out there besides Biomedical Engineering and perhaps you might even find it more interesting than Biomedical Engineering.
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Alexa’s Answer

I think once entering high school, it is never too early to start thinking about college. I personally took some college tours as early as my summer going into sophomore year. While I personally wasn't set on a major, immersing myself in the college environment and sitting through student panels was very eye-opening and helped me decide what is the best college environment for me. From my experience, if you are set on a certain major, the professors and students will be more than eager to speak with you and answer any questions you may have.
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Joseph’s Answer

It's never too early to start that path. If you already have an ideal of your college interest for study, then research the best college and universities that have the major. You can also visit and or speak with advisors.
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Vidhi’s Answer

I would recommend looking into colleges during the end of your sophomore year/beginning of your junior year! Since you will be applying the summer before your junior year (the period is usually June - October), it's good to have an idea of what colleges you're interested in before then. You get some time to tour colleges as well and ask questions to your upperclassmen!
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LISA’s Answer

Greetings MYRICK,
You ASKED-If I'm certain about a career path when should I start looking at schools that offer the major that ties into the career?

I would highly recommend you really start looking to attend your dream college of your choice as you enter into your first high school year. You really need to start researching what college/university offers the major you so desire to obtain and once your narrow a few selection of your choice them you should try to schedule to take a tour to visit to ensure that instution will be a place where your feel comfortable learning and living for the next four (4) years to obtain your Undergrad Degree and hopefully you will continue to pursue a MBA.

Best of luck in deciding!
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Alexa’s Answer

It's never too early to look at schools, but most students typically start this process Junior year. If you are passionate about this career path, it is important that your coursework and experience align with the requirements for the major.
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Jenya’s Answer

Hey Myrick,

I would recommend starting by looking at what kind of classes you need to get into most programs. Maybe 4/5 schools you are looking at require at least two chemistry classes then it makes it easier to figure which classes to take. I would also say don't pin yourself down too much. I understand that right now you are set on Biomedical, but you might switch. So make sure to take classes that would allow you to pivot. Next, rankings matter to an extend, but truthfully, cost matters so much more. A state school is a good option, and I wouldn't count them out yet. Plus, taking out student loans will delay when you are able to start saving.
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McCauley’s Answer

Hi Myrick,

If you are certain about wanting to go into biomedical engineering, I would absolutely focus in on schools with strong programs! However, I do know other people who thought they were certain about a major and ended up changing their mind. While that might not be the case for you, I recommend keeping an open mind just in case. I think starting with schools with strong BME programs is your best bet!
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Myrick,

It's advisable to commence your exploration of institutions offering a Biomedical Engineering major towards the latter part of your sophomore year or at the onset of your junior year in high school.

Biomedical Engineering is a unique blend of engineering principles with medical and biological sciences. To carve a career path in this specialized field, securing a degree from a renowned university with a robust Biomedical Engineering program is a prerequisite.

Here are some actionable steps to guide you in your quest:

1. Investigate Biomedical Engineering programs: Initiate your journey by probing into universities that provide Biomedical Engineering as a major. Prioritize programs accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), ensuring the program adheres to certain quality benchmarks. Evaluate different programs based on faculty credentials, research prospects, and the success rate of alumni.

2. Evaluate location and cost: When examining various schools, take into account aspects like location and cost. Some students might favor staying proximate to home, while others might be inclined to experience a school in a different region. Remember, tuition and fees can fluctuate considerably among schools, making it crucial to consider cost in your decision-making process.

3. Tour campuses: After shortlisting potential schools, endeavor to visit each campus if feasible. This will provide a deeper insight into the university's environment and community, as well as the specific Biomedical Engineering program. During your campus visit, aim to interact with faculty members and current students to understand the program's pros and cons better.

4. Gear up for the application process: Once you've pinpointed your preferred choices, begin preparations for the application process. This might involve taking the SAT or ACT, fulfilling any mandatory prerequisites, and procuring letters of recommendation. Make sure to acquaint yourself with each school's application deadlines and prerequisites.

5. Apply to several schools: Lastly, it's wise to apply to numerous schools to amplify your chances of gaining admission into a reputable Biomedical Engineering program. This approach will also provide you with a wider range of options when deciding which school to ultimately enroll in.

In summary, initiating your hunt for Biomedical Engineering programs during your sophomore or junior year of high school will afford you ample time to explore various options and make a well-informed decision about the school that best suits your needs.

May God be with you!
James Constantine.
Thank you comment icon GOOD WORK. James Constantine Frangos
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Ben’s Answer

This is a great question and it is fantastic to see that you already have a good understanding of what you would like to pursue. You should absolutely spend the time now to research what schools offer the best program for the degree you would like. You should also consider what companies you would potentially like to work for - To that point, some companies will only hire new grads from certain schools. Moreover, the school that you get your degree can provide you long last connections, so it is important to look for schools as soon as you can to put yourself in the best position possible to succeed based on the current circumstances
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