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what should I take as a high school student to get into the design field?

I'm in tenth grade and I want to be an interior designer if I'm not great a math would it be hard? I do help my dad most of the time with his reno houses so I have some experience.

Thank you comment icon I took digital design classes. devin smith

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Meghan’s Answer

Hello Ella!

Graphic design classes are always a great choice, most interior design work is done on the computer now! If your high school has an interior design class, that could be a fantastic opportunity to explore your taste and style. Drafting classes are also a good pick, they teach you how to create floor plans and that's a handy skill to have.

Budgeting is another important aspect, so why not try an accounting class? It could help you manage the finances better. Lastly, depending on the job you choose, some sales skills might come in handy. So, a business or sales class could be a good addition to your schedule.

Hope this helps!
Meghan
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Kim’s Answer

It's awesome that you're interested in pursuing a career in the design field, specifically interior design. As a high school student, there are a few things you can do to prepare for this path:

1. Take art and design-related classes: Look for art, drawing, and design courses offered at your high school. These classes can help you develop your artistic skills and provide a foundation for your future studies in design.

2. Build a portfolio: Start creating a portfolio of your artwork, sketches, and any design projects you have worked on. This will showcase your creativity and skills when applying to design programs or internships in the future.

3. Explore design software: Familiarize yourself with design software like AutoCAD, SketchUp, or Adobe Creative Suite. These tools are commonly used in the design industry, and having some knowledge of them can be beneficial.

Regarding math, while it is true that some aspects of design might involve mathematical concepts like measurements and spatial calculations, being an interior designer doesn't necessarily mean you have to be a math whiz. Many designers work with contractors and professionals who handle the technical aspects. Your experience helping your dad with renovation houses is a great start and will give you practical knowledge that can be valuable in your future career.

Remember, passion, creativity, and a willingness to learn are essential qualities for a successful interior designer. Keep exploring your interests, gaining experience, and honing your skills.

I can suggest some Outschool courses that might be helpful for you in the design field:

1. "Introduction to Interior Design" - This course provides an overview of the principles and elements of interior design, including color theory, space planning, and furniture arrangement.

2. "Architectural Drawing and Design" - In this course, you'll learn how to create architectural drawings and designs using both traditional and digital methods.

3. "Digital Design and Photoshop Basics" - This course focuses on teaching you the fundamentals of digital design using Photoshop, including photo editing, graphic design, and creating digital art.

4. "Introduction to Graphic Design" - If you're interested in graphic design, this course will introduce you to the basics of typography, layout design, and visual communication.

Remember to check out the course descriptions, reviews, and prerequisites to see which ones align with your interests and goals. Outschool offers a wide range of courses taught by experienced instructors, so you'll have plenty of options to choose from. Good luck with your design journey.
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Michelle’s Answer

Hello, Ella !

What a fantastic career choice you have and pursuing interior design will probably make you very happy !

Although I can't say how much or what type of math would be involved, you would most likely be needing to know measurements, weights, fractions and how to price materials. As you go along, you will learn the numbers you'll need to know and use but it may not be anything past what you already know how to do. There are also tons of online tools for math and measuring through apps. You would probably need to know how to scale, also, resize or create smaller or larger versions of things. I wouldn't worry too much about the math.

Since you are already engaged in renovations, I would advise you to start a resume now and also see if you could get involved in any sort of designing group at your high school. Even if it's textile design or accessory design. Take photos of your work, too so that you may start a portfolio. See if a class is offered in Blueprint creation. Take the closest art classes that fit into interior design while you are still in high school.

Start looking into Interior Design colleges and review their course catalogs. You can also start reading the trade magazines. Here is a list of 50 trade magazines that are recommended by the Essential Home website https://www.essentialhome.eu/inspirations/lifestyle/interior-design-magazines-need-read-love-design/

Once you check out colleges that you may want to go to, if the college has a Theatre Department, I would highly suggest that you take two classes there. One is Theatre Graphics and the other one, though quite intense, is Stagecraft Scenic Construction. These two courses will exercise your skills and even teach you new ones and bring you through projects that will require you to design interiors. You have some time to look into colleges and it would be advantageous to start looking now. Consider the Ohio State University in Columbus with a tuition of $10,000.00 per year. Columbus College of Art and Design in Cleveland is $30,000 a year. Both of these colleges offer a Bachelors Degree in Interior Design. You can explore further than your state if you choose to relocate for college.

I hope that this is helpful and I wish you all the best !
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Davana’s Answer

Hello Ella,
Pursuing a career in interior design is an exciting path, and your interest and exposure to construction and renovation through your dad's business is a fantastic foundation to build upon.
I understand your concern about math-- but imagine this: You're sitting in math class, and the numbers on the board seem like a foreign language. But then, something magical happens. You start picturing those numbers as measurements for the dream bedroom you've been sketching in your notebook. Suddenly, math isn't just about equations—it's about bringing your design ideas to life.
When you realize that math is the key to creating beautiful, functional spaces, it transforms from a chore into a superpower. You start seeing geometry as the secret behind perfectly proportioned rooms, and algebra as the tool for solving design dilemmas. Every math problem becomes a puzzle to solve, leading you one step closer to your fabulous vision!
Much like you-- growing up I was fortunate to be exposed to the construction process through my family's home-building project. Witnessing the intricacies of construction, from laying the foundation to installing plumbing and electrical systems, provided invaluable insights into the mechanics of how structures come together.
Your exposure and understanding of construction will allow you to make more informed design decisions. For example, knowing the limitations and capabilities of different materials and construction techniques will help you create practical and buildable solutions for your clients. The integration of construction knowledge into your design practice, will not only help you become a more versatile and well-rounded designer, but you will also gain a deeper appreciation for the seamless integration of form and function in architectural spaces.

Consider these next steps while you are in high school. Focus on courses that will complement your interest in interior design and help improve your math skills:
• Mathematics: Aim to take courses like algebra, geometry, these will provide
you with a strong foundation in math.
• Art and Design: Take art and design classes to enhance your creativity and understanding of aesthetic principles.
• Technical Drawing or CAD (Computer-Aided Design): These courses can help you develop skills in drafting and digital design tools, which are essential in the field of interior design.
• Home Economics or Woodworking: These classes can provide practical knowledge related to materials and construction techniques.
Explore Extracurricular Activities:
• Join a design club or art club at your school to connect with peers who share your interests and learn from each other.
• Consider volunteering for community projects or internships with interior designers or architects. This hands-on experience will provide valuable insights and practical skills.
• Attend workshops, seminars, or online courses related to interior design and architecture. There are many resources available that can help you deepen your understanding and expand your skills.
Create a Portfolio:
• It is never too early to start building a portfolio-- documenting your design ideas, sketches, and projects to showcase your creativity and skills.
• Your portfolio will evolve throughout your career and be important when applying to design schools or seeking internships/jobs in the future.

Always stay curious and open-minded-- exploring different aspects of interior design, from residential to commercial spaces, and from traditional to contemporary styles. The more you expose yourself to, the more you'll learn and grow as a designer.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Ella,

Response:

Mapping Out Your High School Journey Towards a Design Career:

If you're a high school student with dreams of a career in design, it's crucial to start preparing early. While math can be a useful tool in design, it's not a must-have for success. Here are some practical steps to guide you towards your goal:

Prioritize Art and Design Classes: Enrolling in art and design classes during high school will lay a strong foundation for a future in interior design. These classes will help you nurture your creativity, enhance spatial perception, and deepen your understanding of aesthetics - all vital skills for a designer.

Get Involved in Extracurricular Activities: Participating in extracurricular activities related to art and design can boost your skills and knowledge. Think about joining art clubs, entering design contests, or volunteering for projects where you can flex your creative muscles.

Start Your Portfolio: Begin putting together a portfolio of your work as early as possible. This could include sketches, drawings, paintings, or any other creative projects you've completed. A compelling portfolio is a must when applying for college programs or internships in the design field.

Acquire Hands-On Experience: The experience you've gained helping your dad with renovation projects is invaluable, offering insight into the practical side of design. Seek out more opportunities for real-world experience, such as internships or part-time jobs at design firms or construction companies.

Explore College Programs: Research college programs that offer degrees in interior design or related fields. Look at the curriculum, faculty expertise, internship opportunities, and resources at each institution to find the program that best fits your career aspirations.

Connect with Industry Professionals: Networking with professionals in the design industry can provide insights into their experiences and the field. Attending industry events, workshops, or conferences can help you establish connections and broaden your understanding of the industry.

In conclusion, while math skills can be useful in some areas of interior design, they're not a necessity for success. By concentrating on honing your artistic skills, gaining practical experience, creating a robust portfolio, and networking with professionals, you're setting yourself up for a successful career in interior design.

Top 3 Reliable Sources Used:

American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) - ASID is a professional organization that provides valuable resources and information for those interested in interior design careers. Their website offers insights into education requirements, career paths, and industry trends.

National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) - NASAD is an accrediting body that sets national standards for undergraduate and graduate degrees in art and design. Their website offers information on accredited programs and guidelines for students interested in art and design careers.

Interior Design Educators Council (IDEC) - IDEC is committed to promoting excellence in interior design education. They offer publications, conferences, and networking opportunities for students and educators interested in interior design.

These sources were used to ensure the information provided about educational pathways and resources for those interested in a career in interior design is accurate and current.

GOD BLESS YOU!
JC.
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Linda’s Answer

Before education was available to the masses the elder of a family taught his children his trade or skills so that they should succeed. I think the fact that you are fortunate enough to work with your father on Reno's is such a huge advantage. As designers we make spaces beautiful and liveable for everyday busy lives, knowing how the spaces are constructed nail by board, by tile laid, concrete poured, front door installed and keyed gives you a great advantage. Interior Design is not just making things pretty but knowing how they work and function so when you spec a certain flooring, for example, you are confident you are recommending the right materials for that project. So keeping this in mind any classes you encounter that you thing will accomplish this goal I would pursue and any other activities you might gain benefit as such from. You are also learning how to run and control a job site, so important for you and your clients. Remember this is your design and as such your responsibility to have completed with integrity and professionalism and it is you and only you your client will look to for answers about their project always respect them with the truth. Good luck and work hard it will pay off!
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Linda’s Answer

Before education was available to the masses the elder of a family taught his children his trade or skills so that they should succeed. I think the fact that you are fortunate enough to work with your father on Reno's is such a huge advantage. As designers we make spaces beautiful and liveable for everyday busy lives, knowing how the spaces are constructed nail by board, by tile laid, concrete poured, front door installed and keyed gives you a great advantage. Interior Design is not just making things pretty but knowing how they work and function so when you spec a certain flooring, for example, you are confident you are recommending the right materials for that project. So keeping this in mind any classes you encounter that you thing will accomplish this goal I would pursue and any other activities you might gain benefit as such from. You are also learning how to run and control a job site, so important for you and your clients. Remember this is your design and as such your responsibility to have completed with integrity and professionalism and it is you and only you your client will look to for answers about their project always respect them with the truth. Good luck and work hard it will pay off!
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