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how to reason well?

best reasonings

Thank you comment icon Good Morning from Sweden! Your question is: how to reason well? My answer is going to reflect an end goal. Good reasoning would support the following maxim: begin any endevor with the end in mind. Author Stephen Covey wrote a book titled "The 7 habits of highly effective people" that included this habit or principle of beginning with the end goal in mind. This is our starting point Nelson. Reasoning well is a means to a goal bur not a goal in itself. Is your goal happiness? Peace of mind? If that is youv end goal I can help. If not, let's stop there. I will wait for your reply. Fondly, Jim Jim Barnard

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Linda’s Answer

The simple answer assuming you are a reasonable human being, is to put yourself in place where the situation, what ever it is, is or has effected you or will effect you and how would you like to be treated as a human being in response to said situations in all matters. Act accordingly as you would like to be treated or the situation treated. That is reasonable! You have reasoned well. Treat people kind even if they don't respond for you can never know all that others are carrying as a burden and acting towards people and events as you would want to be acted upon is human and reasonable insuring a positive outcome.
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Chris’s Answer

To me the hallmark of making well reasoned decisions is being open to considering new information. When I was in High School, I had a teacher who would frequently provide us with essay prompts that contradicted a previous position we had expressed and then had us go back and edit previous papers in light of the new information that we had learned. This process taught me a valuable lesson about how to reconsider my previous positions based on new information. Reasoning by its very nature is a skill that can be honed over time.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Nelson,

Mastering the Art of Sound Reasoning

The ability to reason effectively is a vital skill that finds its application in numerous areas of life, such as academics, professional pursuits, business, and personal decision-making. Here are some actionable steps to bolster your reasoning capabilities:

1. Cultivate Critical Thinking Abilities: The bedrock of sound reasoning lies in critical thinking. This involves the objective analysis of information, evaluation of arguments, and making decisions based on evidence rather than emotions or biases. To hone your critical thinking skills, make it a habit to challenge assumptions, consider diverse viewpoints, and seek evidence to back up claims.

2. Recognize Logical Fallacies: Logical fallacies are reasoning errors that can compromise the credibility of arguments. By acquainting yourself with common fallacies like ad hominem attacks, straw man arguments, and false cause fallacies, you can sidestep these errors in your reasoning and more effectively assess the arguments put forth by others.

3. Exercise Syllogistic Reasoning: Syllogistic reasoning involves drawing conclusions from two propositions that are presumed to be true. By practicing syllogisms and understanding how premises lead to conclusions, you can fortify your deductive reasoning skills and make more robust judgments.

4. Embrace Diverse Perspectives: Opening yourself up to varied viewpoints and engaging in conversations with people holding different opinions can widen your perspective and challenge your assumptions. This practice can aid you in considering alternative viewpoints and bolster your capacity to reason effectively by weighing different arguments.

5. Apply Decision-Making Frameworks: Decision-making frameworks like cost-benefit analysis, SWOT analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats), and decision trees offer structured methodologies to reason through intricate problems or choices. By utilizing these frameworks, you can systematically assess options and make well-informed decisions.

6. Reflect on Your Reasoning Process: Regularly reflecting on how you arrived at a particular conclusion or decision can help you spot any weaknesses in your reasoning process. Consider maintaining a journal where you record your thoughts and decisions to monitor your progress in enhancing your reasoning skills over time.

By integrating these strategies into your daily regimen and actively practicing them in various contexts, you can amplify your ability to reason effectively and make more informed decisions in all facets of your life.

Top 3 Authoritative Sources Used:

Harvard Business Review: The Harvard Business Review is a trusted source for insights on business management strategies, leadership practices, and decision-making processes.

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy offers comprehensive articles on a range of philosophical topics, including critical thinking, logic, and principles of reasoning.

The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI): NCBI provides scholarly articles and research studies related to cognitive psychology, decision-making processes, and the development of logical reasoning skills.

These sources were referenced to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information provided on enhancing reasoning skills across different domains.

GOD BLESS!
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Hagen’s Answer

James has a lot of good thoughts (above). I was fortunate enough to study philosophy at Berkeley back in the 90s. What I remember most about that experience was how fun and exciting it was to learn about a given philosopher's ideas only to see that beautiful citadel collapse in a heap. I thought "How can something so brilliant and clever fail so dramatically?" As it happened my classes followed something of a historical path (Aristotle, Kant, Heidegger...) and I saw the same thing happen over and over again. From that I learned to be more cautious and critical when presented with new ideas (to me). I can still be inspired and in awe of impressive thinking across the spectrum of ideas (e.g. Jung in psychology, Shiller in economics, Levine on music theory and so forth). However, I am less inclined to put all my hopes in any one theory.

Hagen recommends the following next steps:

READ, READ, READ - reading lots of points of view across different academic and business domains has a direct impact on reasoning.
Don't be afraid to read / learn topics that are hard and you don't readily understand. Reading things you don't understand is a skill and the only way to really broaden your perspective.
Get educated. If you can afford it , (not a given these days) go to college. Doesn't have to be an Ivy League university, in fact studies find smaller schools are better for many students.
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Andres’s Answer

A good reasoning for any idea involves a clear understanding of the problem you're trying to solve, a logical approach to solving it, and a clear vision of what success looks like.

First, you need to clearly define the problem and understand its nuances. This involves gathering as ***much information as possible*** and analyzing it thoroughly.

Next, you need to develop a logical approach to solving the problem. This can involve brainstorming different solutions, evaluating their pros and cons, and selecting the most promising one.

Finally, you need to keep the end goal in mind at all times. This means always considering how your actions are contributing to the achievement of this goal. It can be helpful to regularly check in on your progress and adjust your approach as necessary.

Remember, a good idea is not just about the end result, but also about the journey to get there. It's about learning, adapting, and constantly striving to do better.
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Kristal’s Answer

Boosting your emotional and cognitive empathy is key to achieving effective reasoning.

Cognitive empathy is all about getting into another person's mind, grasping their thoughts and emotions. On the other hand, emotional empathy is about syncing your feelings with theirs. If they're down or shedding tears, you too might feel a pang of sadness or find your eyes welling up.

Striking the right balance between these two forms of empathy is essential for successful communication and understanding with others.
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Lina’s Answer

Hello! You've raised a great question. In my journey, I've found that expanding my knowledge about Design Thinking methodologies has significantly improved my questioning skills and nurtured my curiosity. This proves beneficial in comprehending the problem at hand and understanding what truly matters to your customer or the person you're seeking to influence.

It's essential to listen with the intent to understand, rather than just to respond. Dive deep into the topic, explore available resources, and then take a moment to reflect on the information you've gathered. Based on this, draft a proposal addressing the key points you've discovered.

To ensure your idea is robust, present it to someone who isn't afraid to challenge your thinking. They can ask insightful questions that will help you anticipate potential issues with your stakeholder. This process will provide valuable perspectives, allowing you to adjust or fine-tune your approach.

Lastly, never stop listening and asking meaningful questions, such as "What does success look and feel like for you?" This will keep you aligned with your stakeholder's vision.
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