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How much does your personality affect your Career?

On one personality test, I got 'Building 100', and, I got 'Artistic' (Creative) as my main personality. I also got:
1. Thinking: 48
2. Creating: 29
3. Helping: 25
4. Persuading: 57
5. Organizing: 39

1. Conventional:
--Organizer
2. Realistic:
--Doer

How much do these tests affect you?

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

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5 answers


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Elizabeth’s Answer

One thing to keep in mind - I took a personality test many years ago and the person who helped me interpret that test said I would not be good as a manager. I took that to heart and stayed away from management. Years later, I had someone tell me I'd be a great manager! As Emina said, use these tests as a guide, but don't let it define you. Who knows where I'd be if I'd just ignored that test!
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Courtney’s Answer

Taking a personality test can be a rollercoaster of emotions. It can be an exciting journey of self-discovery, yet it can also lead to overthinking. However, it's crucial to remember that your responses to these tests can evolve as you grow and gain new experiences. Sometimes, the way you perceive yourself may differ from how others see you. The key takeaway is that a personality test, much like a career test, is a tool designed to offer guidance, not to dictate your life's path.

This tool can shed light on career paths you might never have thought about, or it could present you with a plethora of options, too few, or even some that don't resonate with you. Regardless, your unique personality can always bring something special to any career you choose. For instance, as an engineer, I might fit the stereotype of being introverted, organized, mathematically inclined, and right-brained. But that doesn't mean I can't be creative or that creativity has no place in my profession. In fact, creativity is the cornerstone of problem-solving in engineering. It allows me to envision things that haven't been created yet.

Everyone possesses a diverse mix of personality traits, which can either pose challenges or offer advantages in your career. A perfect example would be introverts working in customer service roles. It doesn't make them less competent - it just means they need some time to recharge after a long day. Ultimately, a personality test should serve as a tool for self-discovery and an exploration of how your personality traits can enhance your skills or hobbies.
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Michelle’s Answer

Hello, Richard Lee !

Sometimes, it's just plain fun to take personality tests to compare how true they end up being and how close the results are to the person you are. I remember taking one of them many moons ago and it really did result in the actual two careers I did go into, but I just took the test to see how accurate it would be. Although it was accurate in my case, it doesn't mean that that's what you should be limited to. Life experiences will inspire you for a career as well as personal interests and skills that you discover.

I once worked at a place that required the DISC test https://www.123test.com/disc-personality-test/ I also applied for a job once that wanted the DISC test results as part of the application package. I'm not sure that I take these tests to heart, but on the other hand, the times I've taken them they were unexpectedly accurate. Sometimes you will have to take these tests while you are at a job so HR and managers can get an idea of how compatible the co-workers are in their work styles. The only thing you can really do is take the test and use your own judgement as to how true it is for you and how you'd want to use the test.

The most important thing is that you explore various types of work that you love to do and you can bring any of the test trait results into any type of work you decide that you want. Most evaluation of personality is done in person (or remotely) during job interviews anyway, so I wouldn't be too concerned about tests. In reality, you can do anything that you set your mind to.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Richard,

Career Choices and Personality Traits

Your personality plays a significant role in shaping your career path, job satisfaction, and overall workplace success. The traits that define your personality can impact how you interact with others, your work style, your problem-solving skills, and even the kind of work environment you prefer. By understanding your personality, you can make better-informed decisions about your career and identify roles that best suit your strengths and preferences.

The Influence of Personality Test Outcomes

In your specific case, your primary personality trait has been identified as 'Artistic' (Creative). This suggests that you might excel in roles that demand creativity, innovation, and thinking outside the box. The detailed scores you received in various areas like Thinking, Creating, Helping, Persuading, and Organizing offer a glimpse into your strengths and preferences at work.

For instance:

Thinking: A score of 48 indicates a balance between analytical thinking and creativity.
Creating: A score of 29 shows a moderate tendency towards generating new ideas.
Helping: A score of 25 suggests a lesser preference for roles centered around directly assisting others.
Persuading: A score of 57 underscores strong persuasive skills.
Organizing: A score of 39 reveals a moderate tendency towards tasks involving organization.

These results clearly suggest that you may excel in roles that require persuasive communication, creative problem-solving, and a blend of analytical and innovative thinking. Understanding these aspects of your personality can steer you towards careers where these traits are valued and effectively utilized.

The Significance of Personality Tests

Personality tests like the one you took are useful instruments for self-discovery and career planning. They offer insights into your strengths, weaknesses, work styles, and preferences. Although these tests don't definitively predict future success or limitations in a specific career, they can serve as a springboard for self-reflection and exploration.

It's crucial to interpret the results of personality tests alongside other factors like interests, values, skills, and goals when making career choices. These tests should be seen as guides rather than rigid determinants of your career trajectory.

In conclusion, while personality tests can provide valuable insights into your natural tendencies and inclinations, they should be considered in conjunction with other factors when assessing potential career paths. Understanding how your personality aligns with different job roles can assist you in making informed decisions about your professional growth and pursuing opportunities that align with your identity.

Top 3 Credible Sources Used:

Harvard Business Review: This source offers expert insights on a variety of topics related to careers, leadership, psychology, and organizational behavior.
Psychology Today: A reliable source for information on psychology-related topics, including personality assessments and their impact on different aspects of life.
American Psychological Association (APA): APA provides authoritative resources on psychological research findings related to personality assessment tools and their use in different contexts.

May God bless you!
J
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Emina’s Answer

Hello Richard! I appreciate your curiosity. Personality assessments indeed serve as a valuable instrument for gaining deeper self-insight. They empower you to make choices about potential jobs that truly align with your unique self. For instance, you've demonstrated strong skills in persuasion and creativity. These are fantastic traits that you can apply in a multitude of areas such as:

- Public Relations: Your persuasive skills can be used to build and maintain a positive image for the companies you might work for.
- Fundraising: Your creative and persuasive abilities can inspire others to contribute to meaningful causes.
- Film Industry: Your creativity can help you create captivating stories, and your persuasion can help you sell those stories to audiences and investors.
- Photography: Your creative eye can capture stunning images, and your persuasive skills can help you market your work.
- Sales: Your persuasive nature can help you excel in closing deals, and your creativity can help you find unique solutions to meet customer needs.
- Marketing: Your creative ideas can lead to innovative marketing strategies, and your persuasive skills can help those strategies succeed.
- Law/Attorney: Your persuasive skills can be incredibly valuable in the courtroom, and your creativity can help you construct compelling arguments.

Remember, these assessments are just tools to help guide you. They don't define you, but they can help you understand your strengths and how to apply them. Keep exploring and stay positive!
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