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Any advice for high school junior interested in nursing?

I’m from brooklyn new york

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Subject: Career question for you

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Martin’s Answer

Great question! First off, make sure to savor your remaining high school years. If you haven't met the basic requirements in science and math, it might be a good idea to take a course during your senior year. Next, you'll need to apply and get accepted into a school's RN program, which could be either a 2-year or 4-year course. Once you're in, the school might ask you to complete some prerequisite courses before fully enrolling in the nursing program. So, don't worry if you haven't finished many of the courses before starting. If you're in NYC, you're in luck because there's a wide range of schools to pick from, especially if you're planning to study locally. But remember, nursing is going to be your profession, not your entire life. So, don't forget to take courses that you find enjoyable, engage in activities that pique your interest, and most importantly, continue to grow as a person while you're completing your program.
Thank you comment icon I will use this advice as I prepare for my career. Anson
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Anson,

Guidelines for a High School Junior Aspiring to be a Nurse

If you're a high school junior with a passion for nursing, here's a roadmap to help you navigate your way towards this fulfilling career:

1. Strengthen Your Academics:

Prioritize science and math subjects such as biology, chemistry, and anatomy to lay a robust groundwork for your future nursing education.
Strive for a high GPA to boost your chances of acceptance into a top-tier nursing program.
Consider enrolling in Advanced Placement (AP) courses in related fields to showcase your academic prowess.

2. Acquire Healthcare Experience:

Offer your services as a volunteer at local hospitals, clinics, or nursing homes to get a real-life glimpse into the healthcare sector and comprehend the daily duties of nurses.
Think about becoming a certified nursing assistant (CNA) or obtaining other healthcare certifications to bolster your skills and knowledge.

3. Explore Nursing Programs:

Begin your search for nursing programs that align with your career aspirations and interests.
Scrutinize the admission criteria, curriculum, clinical opportunities, and accreditation of various nursing schools to make an educated choice.

4. Connect with Healthcare Professionals:

Connect with nurses or other healthcare professionals in your area to gain deeper insights into the profession and seek guidance.
Participate in nursing conferences, workshops, or events to mingle with industry experts and stay abreast of the latest healthcare trends.

5. Gear Up for College Applications:

Start prepping for college applications ahead of time by preparing for standardized tests like the SAT or ACT.
Craft a persuasive personal statement that underscores your enthusiasm for nursing and why you're an excellent fit for the program.
Solicit recommendation letters from teachers, counselors, or healthcare professionals who can vouch for your abilities and commitment.

6. Stay Current and Active:

Keep up-to-date with recent developments in healthcare by perusing nursing journals, following trustworthy healthcare websites, or participating in online nursing forums.
Partake in extracurricular activities that highlight leadership, teamwork, and community service to fortify your college application.

By adhering to these guidelines and remaining committed to your nursing ambition, you'll be well-equipped to launch a successful career in the healthcare sector.

Top 3 Credible Sources Used:

American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN): The AACN serves as the national representative for baccalaureate and graduate nursing education. It offers invaluable resources on nursing education programs, career paths, accreditation standards, and professional growth opportunities.

National Student Nurses’ Association (NSNA): The NSNA is a nonprofit entity committed to nurturing the professional growth of nursing students. It provides networking platforms, educational resources, scholarships, and advocacy programs for future nurses.

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS): The BLS offers extensive data on job outlooks, career prospects, wage details, and educational prerequisites for various professions, including registered nurses. It's a dependable resource for comprehending the current landscape of the nursing profession in the United States.

May God Bless You!
JC.
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Marisol’s Answer

Good question! Nursing can be really meaningful and rewarding yet it can also be taxing emotionally and physically IF you don’t care for yourself. I recommend becoming a Nursing or Medical Assistant to get a Birds Eye view and see if it’s something you want to further pursue. Good luck in your endeavors.
Thank you comment icon I appreciate you taking the time to answer this. Anson
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Amanda’s Answer

Nursing can be a very broad career for anyone with many paths to obtaining a license in nursing. Some have started as a nurses' aid/medical assistant. Others started by becoming a Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse. And there are those of us who went right for their RN (this has two options as well, 2 year or 4 year degrees). From there you can obtain a Master's or Doctorate in Nursing as an Advanced Practice Nurse (Nurse Practitioner, Midwife) if you have the desire to further your education and/or career. Nursing can be at the inpatient bedside or in the clinics. It is in education and industries. The great thing about nursing is that you can make it whatever you want. My recommendation to anyone wanting to become a nurse is to talk to as many different nurses as you can. And if you get the opportunity to shadow one, do it!
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Dee’s Answer

Hi
Follow your dream. Nursing and medicine are great rewarding professions. If you like medicine do well in your anatomy and physiology classes.
🙏
Dee
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Heather’s Answer

The National Student Nurses' Association has resources for people interested in nursing: NSNA.org
The American Nurses Association also has some resources available: nursingworld.org
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Gina’s Answer

If you're a high school junior interested in pursuing a career in nursing, here are some tips to help you get started:

1. Research Nursing Programs: Look into different nursing programs and their admission requirements. Consider factors such as program reputation, accreditation, curriculum, and clinical opportunities. Research both local and out-of-state options to find the best fit for you.

2. Take Relevant High School Courses: Focus on taking science courses such as biology, chemistry, and anatomy if available at your high school. These courses will provide a strong foundation for your future nursing studies.

3. Volunteer or Shadow: Seek opportunities to volunteer at hospitals, clinics, or nursing homes. This will give you exposure to the healthcare field and allow you to observe nurses in action. Consider reaching out to local healthcare facilities to inquire about shadowing opportunities.

4. Join Health-Related Clubs or Organizations: Participate in clubs or organizations at your high school that are related to healthcare or nursing. This can provide you with additional learning opportunities, networking, and leadership experiences.

5. Maintain a Strong GPA: Nursing programs are often competitive, so strive for academic excellence. Focus on maintaining a strong GPA, especially in science and math courses.

6. Prepare for Standardized Tests: Start preparing for standardized tests such as the SAT or ACT. Many nursing programs require these scores as part of the admission process. Consider taking preparatory courses or using study resources to improve your scores.

7. Seek Guidance from School Counselors: Schedule a meeting with your high school counselor to discuss your interest in nursing. They can provide guidance on course selection, college applications, and scholarship opportunities.

8. Research Scholarships and Financial Aid: Look into scholarships and financial aid options specifically for nursing students. Many organizations and institutions offer scholarships to support aspiring nurses.

9. Attend Nursing Information Sessions: Look for nursing information sessions or open houses at local colleges or universities. These events provide an opportunity to learn more about the nursing programs, meet faculty, and ask questions.

10. Stay Informed: Keep up with current trends and issues in the nursing field. Read nursing journals, follow nursing organizations on social media, and stay informed about healthcare news.

Remember, nursing is a rewarding and challenging profession. Stay focused, work hard, and seek out opportunities to gain experience and knowledge in the field. Good luck on your journey to becoming a nurse!
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Kess’s Answer

Hi, Anson! Great question!

The above answers are all very well put; this is just to add to that.

Nursing is an amazing, challenging, rewarding field. There are so many both great and terrible things in it. Working with people, helping patients on their worst days, and scheduling can all be great or awful. For example, you may work with amazing people, you will probably also work with very difficult people. Some days the patients will pull through, some days all the news will be the worst news possible. You could work the exact hours you want, or you might get called in on your days off.

The best thing about nursing, besides the job itself, is the variability. You can work with any population you want; babies, kids, adults, elders, or a mix thereof. Your hours can be standard in a clinic working 9-5 or you might opt to work in the emergency department from 7am-7pm (or 7pm-7am). If you want more excitement, you can change departments in the hospital to emergency or critical care. If you want less, consider transferring to a quieter specialty. Nurses can specialize in specific body systems such as cardiac (heart), pulmonary (lungs), or even mental health or may generalize and work in emergency, critical care, a doctor's office, or homes.

Plus, there are so many levels. If you aren't sure, maybe start as an EMT (emergency medical tech) or an LPN (licensed practical nurse). If you love it, consider becoming a Nurse Practitioner or pursing a Doctorate of Nursing.

Kess recommends the following next steps:

Consider your local Community College - many have nursing programs
If pursing a higher degree, make sure to apply for FAFSA (student financial aid), and knock out as many courses as you can before transfering to a university
Thank you comment icon Kess, thank you! Anson
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