Skip to main content
12 answers
14
Asked 389 views

What should I consider when creating a resume?

I want to know more about writing up resumes for when I apply for a job

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

14

12 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Michelle’s Answer

Hello, Nabeel !

Learning how to compose a resume and what information to include is a very useful skill. There are professional resume writers who write them for people, there are templates online to use for a resume and then there's the option of composing a resume for yourself. You can also seek the assistance at a non-profit that would not charge you to do your resume. Knowing how to do it yourself will save you money and give it that special touch.

Your resume should have your name and contact information, your work history with dates, company, position, education, training, certifications. You can have a separate section for volunteer work and unpaid internships, too. Any special skills should be shown on your resume, too. If you have a website or Linked In account, add the web addresses to the resume. A cover letter goes along with a resume and can highlight what your goals are and how you can contribute to a company. A resume should be one page and you can see examples of resumes online to get an idea of the different formats.

If you can find someone to help you with your first resume that doesn't charge a fee, that would be wonderful. Check with your public library or school social worker or Career Center for a referral or direct service. They may be very helpful in drawing out information to put on your resume. This is especially a good idea if you've never had employment yet, are still in high school, or just prefer to have assistance with it. Some non-profit organizations offer employment services at no charge, so look into it. You can contact Students Rising Above at (415) 333-4222, Sunset Youth Services at (415) 665-0255, Bay Area Minds Matter in San Francisco at the link below, First Graduate at (415) 561-3450. There are many places where you live that offer services and you can search online for more.

I hope that this is helpful for a start and I wish you all the best !

Michelle recommends the following next steps:

BAY AREA MINDS MATTER IN SAN FRANCISCO www.mindsmatterbay.org
RESUME EXAMPLE - NO EXPERIENCE https://zety.com/blog/resume-with-no-work-experience
RESUME EXAMPLE AND TIPS FOR LITTLE EXPERIENCE - https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/resumes-cover-letters/writing-a-resume-with-no-experience
RESUME EXAMPLES BY TYPE OF WORK - https://career.uga.edu/resume_examples
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Colleen’s Answer

It's not about having bullet points about the role, but adding in what you contributed and how that impacted the team.
Making sure information is tailored to the role you are applying for.
Doing peer reviews to get feedback. And ensuring grammar is good and makes sure it is neat.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Karen’s Answer

Suggest you look online to see several examples of good resumes. Keep it short, one page maximum. Do a draft and show it to parents, relatives, teachers or someone you respect to get feedback before sending it to someone who will determine if you are a good potential candidate.

With every good wish.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Sandeep’s Answer

It is important to be precise.
Most people have 30 seconds to view a resume.
Highlight the important points.
It is good t have numerical data to substantiate your stoty
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Megan’s Answer

Hi Nabeel,

A resume should be a one-page document that is easy to read and highlights your skills and accomplishments as they relate to the job.

Formatting should be simple like Times New Roman no bigger than size 12 font
Use bullet points to describe your experiences.
Bullet points should cover what you did (task), how you did it (skills), and why you did it (result/purpose)

For example, if you babysat a bullet point could look like
-Cared for 2 children ages 5-6 by communicating with parents on expectations resulting in secured future sitting dates

Header: Name, City, State, Phone, Email

Education: Your School, city, state, and expected graduation date

Work Experience:
Job title, company, city, state (show the dates you worked)Month, year-month, year
2-4 bullet points explaining what you did

Campus Involvement
Activity and dates
1-2 bullet points explaining what you did

Volunteer Experience
Activity and dates
1-2 bullet points explaining what you did

There are other things you can add to your resume like a skills section that includes computer skills, language skills, or certifications like CPR
You can have an honors and awards section highlighting recognitions you've earned

I hope this helps!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Astrid’s Answer

Hi Nabeel,

First, look at some examples for resumes in the field you’re applying in. Lately there are many recommendations with some being more visual than others depending on the field.

Next, I’d suggest you look at the resources provided by the companies you’re applying to. Some companies provide guidance and interview preparation tools to help candidates in their journey.

Check out Wonsulting, they have an AI resume builder that walks you through a standard resume format.

The format I default to is having my name and contact info in the header, followed by my education, work experience and any applicable skills. When you add details quantify any achievements if you can (ex: 10% sales growth over 3 years, directed 1 million dollar project, etc..)

Hope this helps!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jodi’s Answer

Hello Nabeel,

Crafting your initial resume is a crucial step, and it's essential to ensure it's comprehensible and straightforward. Here are some easy-to-follow guidelines to assist you:

1. Tailor it to the job: Modify your resume to align with the job you're aiming for. Highlight the skills and experiences that are relevant to that position.

2. Keep it concise: Aim for a resume that's one or two pages long. Utilize bullet points and brief sentences for easy readability.

3. Incorporate powerful words: Initiate each bullet point with a potent word like "orchestrated" or "established" to demonstrate your achievements.

4. Highlight your triumphs: Don't merely enumerate your past job responsibilities. Instead, discuss the positive impacts you made and how you contributed. Use quantifiable data and examples to illustrate your accomplishments.

5. Proofread: Ensure your resume is free from spelling or grammatical errors. A flawless resume appears more polished and professional.

Adhering to these straightforward tips will enable you to create a compelling resume that showcases your abilities and aids you in securing the job you desire.

Wishing you the best of luck!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Stacey’s Answer

Hello Nabeel! Start off by using an AI resume builder to create an initial draft. After that, make sure to personalize your resume to fit the job you're applying for. This will increase your chances of standing out. You've got this!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jerome’s Answer

While it may be tempting to go overboard, sometimes simple is best. Make your resume easy to consume (people who review resumes are busier that ever) and tailor your resume to the job you are seeking. You want your resume to match up so well that reading your resume tells the reviewer that you could be a great fit. You don't need a resume for every job, but definitely tailor it the industry/title you are looking at.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jasanpreet Kaur’s Answer

Hi Nabeel,

As an HR professional, I'm sharing insights into the importance of crafting a compelling resume. With typically just 30 seconds to skim through resumes, it's crucial to capture attention quickly. Here are key considerations to ensure your resume stands out:

1. Tailor your resume for each job: Customize it to highlight experiences and skills relevant to the specific position. Always read the Job Description carefully as it helps you to tailor your resume accordingly. Many candidates tend to use the same resume everywhere, which is considered to be a wrong approach.

2. Use a clear format: Opt for a clean, professional layout with bullet points for easy readability.

3. Include essential sections: Ensure your resume covers Contact Information, Summary/Objective, Work Experience, Education, Skills, and any relevant Certifications or Volunteer Experience.

4. Highlight achievements: Focus on accomplishments rather than just listing duties, quantifying them with numbers or percentages where possible.

5. Use action verbs: Begin each bullet point with a strong action verb to convey proactive engagement and impact.

6. Be concise: Keep your resume brief, aiming for one to two pages based on your experience level.

7. Check for errors: Proofread meticulously to eliminate typos, grammatical errors, or formatting issues.

8. Include keywords: Incorporate relevant terms from the job description to enhance visibility to recruiters and ATS.

9. Showcase transferable skills: Highlight skills adaptable to different roles or industries, particularly valuable when changing careers.

10. Consider visual appeal: Choose a professional font, maintain consistent formatting, and ensure ample white space for an aesthetically pleasing and easy-to-navigate resume.

Attention to these factors will help you create a standout resume that effectively showcases your qualifications, increasing your chances of securing interviews.

Hope it helps!

All the best!

Jasanpreet Kaur recommends the following next steps:

Also remember, always keep a record of what resume you are submitting. So that later on you can refer it back and take the right resume at the time of interview!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Samne’s Answer

Hey there! As an HR professional, I'm here to spill the beans on crafting a killer resume that'll make employers sit up and take notice. Here's the lowdown, straight from the trenches:

- Tailor, Tailor, Tailor!: One size definitely doesn't fit all when it comes to resumes. Customize your resume for each job you apply to, highlighting the skills and experiences most relevant to the position.

- Keep It Clean and Clear: Ain't nobody got time for clutter! Use a clean, professional format with plenty of white space to make your resume easy to read. Stick to a consistent font and formatting style throughout.

- Lead with Your Best: Put your strongest selling points front and center. Whether it's your stellar education, impressive work experience, or killer skills, make sure they're the first things employers see.

- Quantify Your Achievements: Don't just tell employers what you did—show them the impact you made! Use numbers, percentages, or other metrics to quantify your achievements and demonstrate your value.

- Show Some Personality: Your resume should be more than just a laundry list of jobs and skills. Inject a bit of your personality into it to help you stand out from the crowd. Just keep it professional and relevant!

- Proofread Like Your Job Depends on It: Because, well, it kinda does! Typos and grammatical errors are a one-way ticket to the "no" pile. Proofread your resume multiple times, and maybe even have a friend or family member give it a once-over for good measure.

- Highlight Your Transferable Skills: Even if you don't have direct experience in the field you're applying to, chances are you've still got skills that are relevant. Highlight these transferable skills to show employers why you'd be a great fit for the job.

Now, when it comes to job boards, there are plenty out there to choose from. Some popular ones include Indeed, LinkedIn, Glassdoor, and CareerBuilder. Depending on your field and location, you might also want to check out niche job boards specific to your industry.

So there you have it—your crash course in resume writing, straight from the HR trenches. Follow these tips, polish up that resume, and get ready to land your dream job! You've got this! 👊
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Bruce’s Answer

You should typically custom build you resume for the position you are applying for. I have one resume that is 15 pages long that has the major tasks, challenges, triumphs and tools used at each position I've worked on. That resume does not typically get distributed. I look for job postings and see what the position requirements and duties are, then trim down my large resume to highlight the related experience, and summarize or edit out anything that is not relevant or does not have any connecting skills.
Length of a resume really is dependent on your experience.
My main one runs about 4 pages, with certifications, education and current relevant experience taking up the first two pages, and less recent experience following up.

As most of my fields are tech related any experience over 6 years or 2 jobs past is questionably relevant, and as it gets older likely completely in-valid.

Now from the perspective of a manager; I think that most HR does a buzzword search on a resume for matches, and then digs a little deeper to see if the hits on the buzzwords are actual statements. (Most recruiters aren't on the technical expertise side so just go by matching what the position description and requirements say.)
Once HR passes the resume on to the evaluator, the evaluator who knows what the position entails and is on the technical side will look at the resume to determine if your experience matches up.
Be descriptive of what your tasks entail as it shows you're not just filling a resume with buzzwords.
Be aware of your abilities, embellishment, and exaggeration really only help if you can at least talk the trade and have the expertise to talk about it.
Make sure your resume is easy to read. If it gets past the keyword screen and smoke test, then it will be looked at. Reading resumes is not all that interesting and can be tedious so if you want them to pay attention make sure it is clear and easily viewed/read.
Be able to back up what your resume said in an interview.
Really content is more important than length.
0