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Should I wait a year to go to uni and what major should I choose?

What major should I go into and should I wait a year to go to uni? I am 16 and graduated highschool a year and a half early and have no idea what to do next. I decided what college to go but my father thinks I should do a year at community college and then switch to uni. I also have been debating between legal studies and English as my major because I would like to be a lawyer but also travel and teach English in other countries.#Spring24

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Subject: Career question for you

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Kelly’s Answer

Kudos on your early completion! I wish my district was as flexible, but instead, they insist on a four-year schedule filled with non-essential courses. It's heartening to see that other places allow for early graduation.

Embarking on a college journey at 16 can be a rewarding and transformative adventure with countless perks. A key benefit is the chance for personal and intellectual development. By stepping into college life at a younger age, students are introduced to a variety of academic subjects, viewpoints, and challenges that can pique their interest and broaden their understanding. This early immersion in higher education nurtures critical thinking abilities and fosters independence. Moreover, your age can remain your secret unless you choose to share it.

Furthermore, starting college at 16 equips students with a jumpstart on their academic and career path. They get the chance to earn their undergraduate degree sooner than their contemporaries, enabling them to join the workforce or pursue higher studies at a younger age. This early plunge into the job market can offer them a competitive advantage, as they might have more experience and skills than others in their age bracket. Also, beginning college at a younger age can aid in social and emotional growth. While adapting to college life might pose initial challenges, younger students often get the chance to build meaningful bonds with classmates, professors, and mentors. These relationships can offer invaluable support and guidance throughout their college journey and beyond. Additionally, attending college at 16 allows students to delve into their interests and passions in a nurturing and intellectually stimulating setting. Whether they opt for a specific major or explore interdisciplinary studies, college presents a myriad of opportunities for academic and personal discovery. This exploration can assist students in defining their goals, dreams, and values, steering them towards a rewarding and purposeful future.

Another aspect to consider is the prospect of joining the workforce. Despite completing your formal education, child labor laws in many states restrict full-time employment, limiting the tasks that minors can undertake. If work or further education isn't in your immediate future, what's your game plan?
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the advice, Kelly. Carly
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a’s Answer

Just about any major will do but the edu ones are criminal justice type or the most popular ones that must have are the traditional ones of history or English or communications or other tyoes but you should see which type of field you want to go into and takes school for that field criteria before you invest time and money into a field uiu don’t want it won’t have the prerequisites to exceed in the field you chose because you didn’t get the appropriate majors I guess you could probably take a major in yhevtuoevif kaw you want like criminal justice and a minor in English for example or a major in English and a minor in the field you want since you are correctly thinking about what you would like to do dint forget to take a language course and you should nit take a year off nor go yo community college too many other things or obstacles can present themselves
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is really helpful. Carly
Thank you comment icon Your welcome feel free to contact me with any other questions you may have I will sssist you with any experience snd life experience I have which is extensive in the law and legal field best of luck a perez
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Jerome’s Answer

I have found that most people that take a little time off may struggle to go back. If you are going to travel abroad or do an internship, I think that can make a lot of sense, otherwise, I would encourage you to push through. I got my AA at a community college and my BA's at a university. I felt less intimated and the transition was a little easier (I also graduated early from High School. I think I was done @ 17 and 1 month.

Some of the learning you do can also fade during a down year and having to relearn some basics can prove detrimental.

Even if you do just a couple classes, I'd vote for continuing to move forward.
Thank you comment icon I appreciate you taking the time to answer this. Carly
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Rachel’s Answer

Congratulations! Graduating from high school is a major achievement.

I also graduated from high school early and I went to community college afterwards. I am very glad I did! Community college gave me time to take classes in subjects that interested me and helped me find the major I wanted to pursue. It also gave me some extra credits I used when I went to university which helped me gain flexibility in my schedule. I was able to study abroad for a year with no impact to my graduation date.

Based on the subjects you are interested in, I think community college could be a great place to explore your interests and focus on topics you really enjoy. It could also be a great way to get credits in topics like English or Math to give you more time to follow your passion at university.

Whatever you decide I hope you keep exploring your passions and learning more every day! Good luck!
Thank you comment icon Thank you, Rachel! Carly
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Carly,

Should I wait a year to go to uni and what major should I choose?

Making decisions about your future can be overwhelming, especially at a young age. It’s great that you are considering your options carefully. Let’s break down your questions into two parts:

1. Should I wait a year to go to uni?

Taking a gap year before starting university can be beneficial for some students. It allows you to gain life experiences, explore different interests, and clarify your goals before committing to a specific academic path. Here are some factors to consider when deciding whether to wait a year:

Personal Growth: A gap year can provide you with valuable opportunities for personal growth and self-discovery.
Work Experience: During this time, you could gain work experience or internships that may help you in your future career.
Travel: If traveling is important to you, a gap year could allow you to explore new cultures and broaden your horizons.
Academic Readiness: Consider if you feel academically prepared for university or if an extra year of preparation would benefit you.

However, it’s essential to have a clear plan for how you will spend your gap year. Whether it’s working, volunteering, traveling, or pursuing other interests, make sure it aligns with your long-term goals.

2. What major should I choose?

Choosing a major is a significant decision that will shape your academic and professional future. Since you are interested in both legal studies and English, here are some considerations for each:

Legal Studies: Pursuing a major in legal studies can be an excellent choice if you aspire to become a lawyer. It provides foundational knowledge in law and legal systems, preparing you for further education in law school.

English: A major in English can also open up various career paths, including teaching English as a second language (ESL) abroad. This major hones critical thinking, communication skills, and cultural awareness.

If you are torn between the two majors, consider the following factors:

Career Goals: Reflect on whether you are more passionate about pursuing a legal career or teaching English abroad.
Skills Development: Think about which major aligns better with your strengths and interests.
Future Plans: Consider how each major will support your long-term goals and aspirations.

Ultimately, the decision should align with your passions and long-term objectives. You can also seek guidance from academic advisors or professionals in the fields of legal studies and English to gain more insights.

Top 3 Authoritative Sources Used:

The College Board: The College Board provides valuable resources on college planning, majors selection, and gap years for students transitioning from high school to higher education.

U.S. News & World Report - Education Section: U.S. News & World Report offers comprehensive rankings of colleges and universities along with expert advice on choosing majors and educational pathways.

American Bar Association (ABA): The ABA website offers insights into legal education, career paths in law, and resources for aspiring lawyers, which can help inform your decision regarding pursuing legal studies as a major.

These sources were consulted to provide accurate information and guidance on navigating the decisions related to choosing a major and considering a gap year before starting university.

GOD CAN BLESS YOU, RICHLY!
JC.
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ian’s Answer

Choosing the Right College Major for You
Students often struggle with how to choose a major because they're just beginning to discover who they are. It's OK not to have an exact plan for college and a future career. You can start by choosing a major based on your current interests. Then, using your college experience to learn more about yourself, you can change it if you feel the need.

The major you choose will have an impact on the jobs you'll qualify for after graduation, so it's important to use your college experience to determine your long-term career interests. That way, you can pick a major that will help land you a job you love. Here are some key factors to consider so that you can choose the right major for you.

How to Choose a College Major
All students going to college will have to ask themselves, "What major should I choose?" Finding the answer to that question is a challenge. It boils down to identifying your passion. Studies show that students who enjoy what they’re learning perform better in their program of choice. If you choose a major because you’re influenced by others, you may not be as excited and motivated. Consider the advice of friends and family, but never forget that the final decision is yours.

Choosing Your Own Major
Choosing your own major motivates you to invest time and money into what you want to do with your life. Consider how much money an individual with that major typically makes, the current job outlook, and if you can see yourself being in that field for a long time. Data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics can help determine your projected salary and job outlook.

You Don’t Have to Select a Major Right Away
The good news is that there's no pressure to choose a major quickly. Most colleges don't require students to declare a major until the end of sophomore year. If you already have a specific academic track in mind, you can select a concentration as a first-year student or even before taking your first class. This gives you a chance to try major-specific classes earlier and change direction if necessary. You may also be able to take electives in the field you’re considering before declaring a major.

The Impact of Major Choice on College Acceptance
The major you choose can affect your chance of admission if the college only accepts a certain number of applicants into the program. You should research the programs available at each college to better understand their requirements and any restrictions they have on a particular major. If you choose a program that allows only a limited number of applicants, applying for early admission and considering multiple colleges may be helpful.
Thank you comment icon I appreciate this, thank you for the advice. Carly
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Lori’s Answer

Dear Carly,

I noticed a flicker of hesitation when you expressed uncertainty about your choice of major. Have you ever taken the time to truly explore your own identity? Selecting a career is not merely a decision, it's an exciting journey that should be steered by your deepest passions and dreams.

I am confident that if you commit the upcoming six months to keeping a journal, focusing on what you believe would bring happiness to your professional life, your authentic desires will start to unveil themselves.

Keep in mind, you have an abundance of time, so there's no pressure to hurry. Integrating habits like meditation and prayer into your daily routine, even if it's just for a brief 10 minutes, can also steer you towards the right path.

Should you require any guidance on journaling, self-exploration, or meditation, don't hesitate to get in touch.

Sending you waves of positivity and blessings,
Lori ♡
Thank you comment icon This was super helpful, thank you! Carly
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