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What do you do in high school and college to become a midwife?

I am interested in the career of a midwife and I need some course guidance on it.

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Aneela’s Answer

To become a midwife, start in high school by focusing on science courses like biology and chemistry, along with strong skills in math and English. Participate in health-related extracurricular activities and volunteer at healthcare facilities.

In college, choose a relevant major such as nursing (BSN) and complete prerequisite courses like advanced biology and anatomy. Gain practical experience by working or volunteering in healthcare settings. Consider direct-entry midwifery programs or becoming a registered nurse (RN) first.

After your BSN, apply to a graduate midwifery program to become a Certified Nurse-Midwife (CNM), which includes extensive clinical training. Pass the national certification exam from the American Midwifery Certification Board (AMCB), obtain state licensure, and engage in continuing education to maintain your certification and stay updated with best practices.
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Martin’s Answer

Dear Dee, embarking on the journey to become a midwife requires dedication and commitment. First, you'll need to earn your college degree, followed by entering a nurse practitioner program that paves the way to your midwife certification. This journey will enrich your knowledge about maternal health, covering both pre and post-pregnancy scenarios.

As a midwife, you'll play a pivotal role in ensuring a safe and healthy pregnancy journey for many, striving for positive outcomes for all involved. This profession allows you to build meaningful relationships with your patients, making it an incredibly rewarding experience.

However, it's important to remember that midwifery is a round-the-clock commitment. The nature of childbirth doesn't adhere to a 9-5 schedule, so be prepared for some long days and sleepless nights. Nonetheless, the joy and fulfillment you'll derive from this noble profession will make every moment worthwhile.
Thank you comment icon I am really grateful you took the time to answer this question. Dee
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Mary Jane’s Answer

There are a few pathways to becoming a midwife but the one most people pursue is to become a certified nurse midwife, which is an advanced nursing degree.

In high school, I would focus on getting a solid biology, chemistry, math, and psychology education. You may also have the option through a vocational training program at your school to get a CNA certification, which would be helpful for getting patient care experience in high school and college. You should also spend some time volunteering or working with pregnant people and talking to people who work in this field to confirm this is the career path for you.

In college, you can either apply to a nursing program and get a BSN or complete a BS or BA degree. If you get a BSN, you can work with pregnant people in an OB clinic or on a labor and delivery floor, and then apply to a nurse midwifery program to complete your advanced degree.

If you go the BS/BA route, you will need to complete a BSN or MSN degree to become a nurse. In order to apply to a nursing program after graduating from college, you will need to take prerequisite college courses in biology, chemistry, statistics, and psychology. Once you have a nursing degree, there are bridge programs that allow you to complete the advanced degree to become a midwife.

If you elect to complete a 2 year nursing degree at a community college, you can still work your way up to the advanced degree. There are an increasing number of midwifery bridge programs designed for nurses without a Bachelor's or Master's to work towards the advanced practice degree. The Associate's degree gets you into nursing faster and a bit cheaper at the start, but it may take longer to achieve your end goal so you have to weigh the pros and cons of each pathway.

It can be confusing because there are so many on-ramps for nursing that take you to the same destination. In all cases, you will be working towards a graduate-level nurse midwifery degree after completing foundational science and nursing courses. Your best bet is to talk with some midwives in your area and ask them about their career paths. Here's a link to help you get started: https://www.midwife.org/become-a-midwife

Good luck!
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Reema’s Answer

If you aspire to be a midwife, start by focusing on science subjects like biology, chemistry, and anatomy in high school. This will give you a solid base in the crucial subjects for midwifery. Also, get involved in health-related extracurricular activities. You can volunteer at hospitals or clinics, join health science clubs, or shadow healthcare professionals to get a feel for the medical field.

Once you get to college, aim for a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) or a similar field. Make sure you take prerequisite courses for midwifery programs, such as microbiology, human development, and physiology. To deepen your understanding and skills, look for opportunities to gain practical experience. This could be through internships, clinical rotations, or working as a certified nursing assistant (CNA).

After earning your BSN, you'll need to pass the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN) to become a registered nurse (RN). The next step is to apply to accredited midwifery programs. These programs usually require more coursework and clinical practice. When you finish, you'll be certified as a Certified Nurse-Midwife (CNM) through the American Midwifery Certification Board (AMCB).
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