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How much do psychology majors make?

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Things you can consider for this specific question...

What is the average earnings for someone who majored in psychology?
Do certain areas of psychology pay more than others?
If you earned a degree in psychology, what field do you work in? What is the average pay for this career area?

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Andrew’s Answer

Hey Alexandra,

This is a great question! In order to make the most money with a Psychology degree and stay working in the field of Psychology you need to get at least a Master's. This opens you up to a whole avenue of opportunities for employment and to make a difference in the lives of others.

However, I have a Bachelor's in Science in Psychology and have tailored my education to better connect and relate to customers in Sales and most recently in Customer Success and make good money. I went the route of technology, but it is possible to make 6 figures without pursuing a Master's Degree in Psychology.
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Jason’s Answer

You can become licensed with a Master's degree in all 50 states following the specific programs that are typically called a Licensed Professional Counselor, or some derivation of those words. Typically speaking, these folks can operate completely on their own, can charge insurance, and can operate a private practice. With telehealth becoming a very large portion of the future of the field, many insurance companies are preferring to put an LPC in-network because they will charge about $5 less an hour than the PhD.
I urge folks to look closely at the amount of hours required to earn an LPC, it is several thousand and follows very strict guidelines. It is a great field for folks that do not want to spend time working on a dissertation if there is no interest in pursuing research.

I personally worked for a hospital system and did not make a ton of money. I eventually made my way to a clinical position at an insurance company doing behavioral health triage over the phone for children. This paid almost twice what I was making in the private practice and hospital areas. I have since had this company pay me for my MBA and now work in quality with a salary higher than anything I could ever see in private practice unless it was specific and cash only.
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Linda Ann’s Answer

A BS in psychology and $2 will get you a coffee at Starbucks....that's the cynical answer, by the way.


One cannot be a psychologist without and advanced degree, i.e., a PhD or a PsyD in the USA. That being said, a bachelor's degree in psychology can lead one into many different occupational areas. So, there isn't "one answer" to this question. So persons go into marketing; some into the hospitality area; others in the government sector; still others into the non-profit sector; still others into human resources. The pay ranges for each of these sectors is very different. The non-profit sector probably pays the least, providing social services to the indigent, elderly, homeless, etc. Some government positions pay very well, especially at the management and leadership levels. Human Resources in the private sector can be very lucrative. Again, there aren't "psychology jobs" for those persons with only a bachelor's degree. The positions that are available are generally support positions such as research assistant (academic sector) and "therapeutic support specialist" in the non-profit and educational sectors.


Here's a link that you might find useful: https://www.payscale.com/


ALSO, the link for the American Psychological Association: www.apa.org


Hope this helps.

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