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How many hours do you work in a typical week as a wildlife rehabilitator?

high school student looking into becoming a wildlife rehabilitator #zoology #wildlife #biology #animalscience #biologist #job #marine-biology #science

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Sandrine’s Answer

Wildlife rehabilitators are professionals responsible for the care and treatment of injured, orphaned or displaced wildlife. The ultimate goal is to return healthy animals to the wild by fostering their release into appropriate habitats. Animals that cannot be released may be used for educational programs and outreach when appropriate. Consequently, those interested in rehabilitation careers should be knowledgeable in public speaking and environmental education, as well as animal husbandry.

Who works with injured wildlife ?

Wildlife Rehabilitators

Wildlife rehabilitators are involved in all aspects of wildlife care, from intake to release back into the wild (hopefully). Rehabilitators work with the public, taking information when animals arrive into their facility and providing critical care or enlisting the help of their veterinarian when necessary. Rehabilitators are involved in feeding, care of wounds and injures, and the cleaning & maintenance of both the animals and the facilities. Institutions will require additional vaccines, such as rabies, to work with native animals that are considered rabies vector species. As animals grow and heal they may need to be exercised and gradually re-accustomed to the wild prior to release.

Wildlife rehabilitators also work with the public, whether they are involved in education, animal intake or simply dealing with people that call or come to their facility. They help to manage human-wildlife conflict, educating the public about wildlife needs and promoting good conservation practices.
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Paula’s Answer

Hope this helps.... here is what i found.

Once you have a full time position, you'll really never get paid on a hourly basis, you just work until the job's done which in some cases will be less than 30 hours a week but in others it may exceed 80, especially when the work can only be done during a specific time of year. It'll average out to ~40-50 per week, but it's not smooth all year round. Just remember, with today's economy and funding situations, you're likely to stay at the ~$25-40k level for a little longer than expected unless you get a federal job and are willing to move across the country to fill positions.

Many of the wildlifers I know with families tend to incorporate family time with their work to some extent, not because their work is so strenuous, but because the whole family likes getting involved. As an undergrad I was lucky enough to be invited on several of my professor's family vacations which were month-long excursions that included monitoring wolves in Wisconsin and tracking Florida panthers in Corkscrew. Obviously not everyone can be involved to that extent, but you can get an idea of how they can blend together.

As an ecologist, I do much of the same work, but I'm not purely a wildlife biologist. My favorite thing to do is to examine the impacts of various forces (invasive species, management practices, pesticides, etc.) on different trophic levels and population dynamics because it involves a lot of field work. The part I like the least... It's a toss up between statistics and the political agendas you'll sometimes encounter depending on the work you do.
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