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What are some problems that you tend to deal with in Psychology?


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David’s Answer

One of the nice things about being a clinical psychologist is you can specialize within a very wide range of presenting problems, age ranges, and other patient or client variables. I worked mostly in child and family clinic settings, so the problems usually were about a child's behavior, such as not getting along with others, difficulty learning in school, breaking rules, etc., or their feelings, such as anxiety or depression. Because young people are constantly maturing and developing physically, mentally, and socially, the kinds of problems they tend to have are different in different age-ranges.


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K. Michie Harriss’s Answer

I was a psychologist in private practice but also in the past, have worked in state mental health settings and in administration where I helped run the organizations and supervised other clinicians. In addition to providing therapy and psychological assessments, I got to run the business and human resource aspects such as hiring, firing, supervising, and development of staff skills as well as review and negotiate contracts, and supervise budgets. I have consulted with schools, businesses, and law enforcement and courts. There is a wide variety of things you can do!!!!! I worked with children, teens and adults with depression, anxiety, family problems, victims of abuse, psychological testing for learning disabilities, ADHD, autism, etc. Think of the human condition and you can develop the opportunity to work in that area. ! Good Luck!!!!

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George’s Answer

In one of my first classes in the field, I heard a teacher saying, "One of the first thing you need to do is to get your own issues cleared up!".
Through my practice I got to understand that my own issues could have a positive and a negative effect, towards others as well as towards myself. If I had struggled or still struggling with some issues of mine and I'm willing to use these experiences to be able to relate to others' struggles, even to the point of being courageous enough to self-disclose, I could be of great value to my patients/clients. But if I haven't been able to deal, or even face, my own issues when trying to help someone with similar issues, my feeling as a hypocrite would make me feel awful, interfering with my inner peace and the enjoyment of my profession. Also, it might make me give the wrong feedback to my patients/clients by trying to justify my own defects of character, or induce feelings of guilt to the patient/client to reduce my own guilt. Yes, I know, it sounds a little complicated, but the best solution might be to start fearlessly facing your own issues as early as possible during your studies and career.

George recommends the following next steps:

Feel free to contact me should you need more info.

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K. Michie Harriss’s Answer

I was a psychologist in private practice but also in the past, have worked in state mental health settings and in administration where I helped run the organizations and supervised other clinicians. In addition to providing therapy and psychological assessments, I got to run the business and human resource aspects such as hiring, firing, supervising, and development of staff skills as well as review and negotiate contracts, and supervise budgets. I have consulted with schools, businesses, and law enforcement and courts. There is a wide variety of things you can do!!!!! I worked with children, teens and adults with depression, anxiety, family problems, victims of abuse, psychological testing for learning disabilities, ADHD, autism, etc. Think of the human condition and you can develop the opportunity to work in that area. ! Good Luck!!!!

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Dr. Ray’s Answer

Dear Aimaya,

I was in private practice for 34 years and did both psychological testing and therapy.

I evaluated criminal defendants' competence to stand trial and sanity at the time of the offense, parents and children in contested divorce and custody cases, children for learning and attention problems and applicants for Social Security Disability.

On the therapy side I saw children and adults for problems such as depression, anxiety, post traumatic stress and dissociative disorders such as multiple personality disorder, now known as dissociative disorder. I have colleagues who do neuropsychological assessments of people suspected of brain dysfunction, marriage counseling, therapy with substance abuse issues,therapy for gender identity issues, and I could list more.

Obviously no one could do all of these but the range of issues is enormous. If you have a basic interest in the field you will never be bored!

Dr. Ray recommends the following next steps:

The American Psychological Association's web site has some information about clinical speccialties at www.apa.org/careers

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