14 answers

What double major should I choose between maths and physics with a major in computer science ?

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14 answers

Rafael’s Answer

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The first thing I will advise you is to go undecided and take all elective courses without focusing in a particular career, so you don't find yourself like many college students changing major after they have 2 or 3 years in their college. I finish in Computer information system and Bus. Administration. There is not time to party or play around when you double major.
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Maxmillan’s Answer

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When pairing up with a computer science major, I think a good way to determine which one to choose is by considering how you are going to apply potential thought processes to your work. Physics and computer science are both essentially branches of Mathematics. If your goal is to focus primarily on coding for your career, you may want to look into the courses that are being offered at your school and see if you are going to be working with any specific programs that you might be interested in learning. Some physics classes can have the students working with several different coding languages and this would pose as a great opportunity to apply your coding knowledge to different subject areas. If you would rather focus on your theoretical understanding of systems and processes, I would suggest the math major as that would cover more general topics that would pose useful to you. The more you know, the better, so I would first recommend looking into the courses offered, see what they are about, ask other people that have taken the course previously, check online reviews, and if you aren't sure what kind of topics are going to be covered, you can find videos online! If you are still stuck on which one, I would suggest choosing math and then possibly picking up physics as a minor (if you can afford to do so) so that you can cover as much material with as possible.
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Hunter’s Answer

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Math is a very safe bet. Optimization, functional thinking, and algorithms all have a very strong hand in both math and computer science. I would also consider what career you would with to pursue. For example, if you are looking at server-side, web, or mobile development then the very high level maths won't be used on a regular basis (perhaps a math minor would be a better fit). However, if you are more interested in computer rendering, image and video recognition, and AI, then having a deeper understanding of higher level math would be very useful.
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Michael’s Answer

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Honestly, I have to agree with the minor suggestion, versus a dual major, unless your education is being funded and you're not worried about loans.

As far as to pick, practicality would suggest mathematics, but I'll provide a different approach. The best developers are often people who don't narrow their focus to one practice, but rather, have a specific skillset, and then branch out in hobby or passion that also keeps them engaged in a multi-disciplinary way. The most interesting and successful developers and IT professionals I've worked with often have creative outlets that they pursue, and these often help inform how they approach their IT/Tech-related work.

You might think development and coding go hand-in-hand with math, but you also might find that a creative replacement for math is music - with its similarities in mathematical complexities, but the expansiveness to creativity. Or abstract art with it's counter-point in geometry and understanding how to visualize objects in three-dimensional space is useful when running through problems. There's a lot of ways to go approach your career, and it shouldn't be about fitting inside a box.

As an accomplished IT Project Manager and Operations Stategist - my degree is a BA in English with a focus on creative writing. It has helped provide a unique lens through which I (opinion) better communicate, and don't silo myself into one avenue. It makes me a more relational thinker, versus linear thinker - even though I'm primed to also think linearly through processes.

So, have a core focus, but unless it's your only interest, I'd recommend that if you want a second major, make sure it's something you're equally passionate about. Life's too short to only focus on what makes us "successful" without also figuring out what brings us joy.
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Justin’s Answer

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I was in your shoes and chose Computer Science and Math. From my experience they went very well hand-in-hand, and many courses at my university overlapped which made it possible to finish these degrees in a normal timeframe.

I'd be careful to understand that while they are related, they are also distinct majors and will require a lot of effort. You will save yourself a lot of time if you can decide an area of Mathematics that you want to focus on (such as statistics/data analysis/modeling/etc). It also helps to figure this out on the Computer Science side, as typically you will have some flexibility with elective courses you can take. Ultimately what helps is that these two majors have coursework that typically overlaps, so that is where you are able to accelerate some of your learning as you're able to load up on related material.

For what it's worth - it was also very fun and enjoyable. If you have an interest in these areas I think it is worth pursuing them and the career options are second to none.
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Jan Hodges’s Answer

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When considering a double major, first find out if it is going to make your path to the bachelor's longer, and then consider the added cost. Many times, the double major will increase your loan more than your career options. Instead of a second major, consider adding a minor, especially if it doesn't add additional time and money. Your quality of life after the bachelor's degree is dependent on making good choices with your financial aid. Go to your college's career counselor. You are paying for that service with your tuition dollars - use it! Let them assist you with choosing the best major for your career goal.
Thanks for your answer Raphael F. Translate
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Dhairya’s Answer

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I'll offer contrary advice. I'm an artificial intelligence researcher. Double majoring is a great idea. There is a strong overlap between both physics and math requirements with CS programs, so you'll have no problem finishing both degrees in a span of 4 years. It is quite common to see dual cs/math and cs/physics majors. Your core math requirements are quite transferable across all three and it won't require extra semesters or costs.


It's up to you as to what is more enjoyable for you. If I were to do it over again, I would have chosen major in physics as it's fascinating. Additionally, you'll get the advanced math and stats skillset in an applied setting which translates well to CS and AI problems. Math always felt a bit more abstract and theoretical to me, but I have several friends who came from pure math or a math/cs background too. When you get to college take classes in both pure math and physics and purse the major that is more fun for you. Honestly there is no wrong answer and both will serve you well.
Hi Dhairya , thank you for your wonderful insight Raphael F. Translate
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Jimil’s Answer

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I would suggest doing a minor in Math or Stats (if thats offered separately from Math). It will really help you master the branch of data science.
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Sona’s Answer

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Given how much a role, data plays in computer science today and the value of statistical models in computer science and data, it would be ideal to go down the math option, however if you want something more forward looking and like quantum computing like topics, I would suggest physics, as it will lay a strong foundation for it!
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shweta’s Answer

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+Major in Maths would be helpful if you are looking to pursue your career in Computer Science.Functional thinking and algorithm will be helpful to you in computer science in future .If you are doing Major in maths your those techniques would be enhanced .
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Kumi’s Answer

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Not sure why you want to do a double major, but have you considered statistics? I think that's more relevant with the CS, and there doesn't seem to be enough statisticians for data science needs. Stats packages are totally cool, and raw coding is always useful in preping data.
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Lorinda’s Answer

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Math is probably more standard - but physics would set you apart from the reset when you go in to interviews. So my advice (like that of others) is to go with whichever you find most interesting.
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Nicholas’s Answer

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Personally I would choose another major that closely relates to computer science, but if you are really wanting to do one of those two as a second major, I would go with math; physics is great and probably more interesting but the math may help more then physics would depending on what you are trying to do in the computer science realm.
Hey Nicholas , thanks for your answer. What are some other majors that would complement c.s ? Raphael F. Translate
What do you intend to try to do with the major? Are you looking to get into programming/coding, cybersecurity, it help desk, troubleshooting? The IT and computer fields are huge. Nicholas Johnson Translate
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Pushkaraj’s Answer

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If you have already made up your mind about being a double major, and you are confused between maths and physics, I would suggest to go with Maths. In fact, Statistics would be a good choice to go. But as far as relevance goes, Computer science and Maths have much more in common, than with CS and Physics.
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