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Do you really change your mind a lot on your major?

i hear that a lot of people who are going to medical school change what the want to do a lot or they find something else is that true? #medicine

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Lilia’s Answer

Hello MeMe,

This question you posed is something that many incoming and current University students face. I actually was an undeclared major my Freshmen year.

When entering University, some students know exactly what they want to study and what they want to do after completing school. Other students are similar to me where they feel interested in a certain area for a career but are not sure where to focus their studies/career path. More students actually have no idea what they want to do or what they want to study. It is okay not to be sure of this because you can take the general education classes and see what you are interested in, in term of classes and studies. Furthermore, you can shadow potential jobs and get internships to get hand-on experience. The only way to know if you are interested in a career is getting more exposure, knowledge, advice, and insights to best see and experience the career.

Continuing, there are plenty of people that will change their major or career path because they start courses or have internships and realize they are not as interested as they previously thought. Again, some of the people interested in the medical field will have the same thoughts. It is important to get exposure into the major and see what is feasible for a career in that field through classes, work experience, or job shadowing. As a result, the people see other sides to the medical field (or any field for that matter) that they previously were not exposed to, and therefore, they change their majors.

In conclusion, we as people are always developing, learning, and changing along with the environment and other factors in life. Thus, people become interested in different things and therefore, will change majors and even entire careers through their lifetime. In the end, only you know what is best for you. My last piece of advice is to remain proactive and curious. Do not set any limitations on yourself, and you will do great in the medical field or any field. Good luck! majors choosing-a-major college advise college-majors changing-majors
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Kelly’s Answer

I remember switching my major once, three years into my studies. It wasn't so much a dissatisfaction with the subject, but more about the program structure, timetable, and campus location. That's when I realized I needed to choose a new college, one that wasn't influenced by family or friends, but purely by my own needs and preferences. I focused on the course content, schedule, and location, rather than what others thought was best for me.

I've seen others leave their chosen path because they were steered into it by their parents or career advisors, rather than pursuing what truly interested them. One of my acquaintances even quit because they didn't enjoy the practical experience during an internship. Some struggled with their second-year exams, realizing the journey was only going to get tougher.

Interestingly, I've found that my career aspirations have evolved more often than my college major. And here I am, pursuing my 5th degree along with two graduate certificates. My advice to you is simple: if you're content with your current school and program, stick with it. If not, don't hesitate to explore other possibilities.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear MeMe,

As a child, my fascination with the stars led my parents to gift me telescopes, sparking an early aspiration to become an astrophysicist. However, a family tragedy abruptly shifted my focus. A beloved family member, only 38, succumbed to a massive heart attack. Adding to the complexity, my late uncle's former employer arrived at our university as a Professor of Biochemistry.

This chain of events led me to divert my attention from maths and physics to biochemistry and nutrition. My newfound mission was to delve into the study of familial hypercholesterolemia, the condition that claimed my uncle's life. Eventually, I embarked on a journey to become a dietitian, but sadly, I couldn't prevent my father from meeting the same fate as my uncle.

In my career spanning over 35 years, I've had the privilege of helping thousands of patients. There were moments of burnout, undoubtedly, as I juggled my day job with my nighttime passion of programming nutrition software - a pursuit I've been engaged in since 1972.

Indeed, my personal and familial circumstances have significantly shaped my career and life trajectory.

May God bless you!
James Constantine Frangos.
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