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If I wanted to get a job as an RN in California, would it be better to go to a university in state? Is it harder to get a job as a new grad in CA if you went to school in a different state?

#nursing #college #university #newgrad
#healthcare #rn #nurse

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Suzanne’s Answer

Hi Veronica,

This is a really great question! Each State licenses Registered Nurses. Most states will recognize the licenses from other states. It is a bit complicated, but essentially, if you intend on living and practicing in California, then a CA State RN will be perfect.

If you think you might move, this requires a bit of investigation to determine what steps are needed to practice in a different state! Many states offer what is called Reciprocity and will recognize the validity of the license issued from the original state.

There are states that issue a license which is valid across state lines. These are called compact states.

Here is some more information on Reciprocity and Compact States:

https://www.rnlicense.org/RN-license-reciprocity/

https://www.travelnursing.com/news/career-development/a-primer-for-getting-your-nursing-license-in-another-state/

https://nurse.org/articles/enhanced-compact-multi-state-license-eNLC/

https://www.rn.ca.gov/applicants/lic-end.shtml#:~:text=To%20qualify%20for%20endorsement%20(reciprocity,RN%C2%AE)%20or%20the%20State

Regarding working as a new grad: it most likely would be much easier to work in the state where your license has been issued. If you read through what is required by California, you can see the process is complex. There are many hospitals in California that offer New Grad programs and I think once you have graduated with your BSN and passed the state board, this would be an excellent way to enter into practice. I like the idea that these organizations have specialty training for new graduates as they want to ensure continuity of learning in a controlled manner with assigned mentors and preceptors. When I was first hired (LA County-USC Medical Center Hospital/1984) we had only a few weeks of preceptorship and then we were placed on night shift. It was a trial by fire!

https://jobs.cedars-sinai.edu/nursing-new-grads

https://www.adventisthealth.org/about-central-valley/careers/rn-new-graduate-residency-program/

Does this help? The simple answer is this: if you want to work in California, then obtain your license in California. Find a great hospital with a great New Grad program.

Here is a listing of California Schools NCLEX pass rates (a helpful metric when seeking out where to go for your BSN):

https://www.rn.ca.gov/education/passrates.shtml

I am wishing you all the best. The world is in desperate need of professional nurses!
Sue


Suzanne recommends the following next steps:

1. Obtain your Bachelor's of Science in Nursing
2. Study for and Pass the California NCLEX exam
3. Obtain your CA State License
4. Apply for your first position in a hospital offering a structure New Grad program
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for the information! Veronica
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Andy’s Answer

My wife was a travel nurse in California for about 4-5 years after graduating from a nursing school program in Minnesota. While she obviously had to maintain licensing in multiple states, it was a great opportunity to earn high wages and see another part of the country before returning and settling in our home state (Minnesota).
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the information! Veronica
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Kriss’s Answer

Mostly, make sure that whichever nursing school you choose is accredited by an accrediting agency that is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. You can't go wrong with a State school rather than a private for profit school.
Thank you comment icon Thank you! Veronica
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Jessica’s Answer

Hi Veronica,

I am not a nurse, but I am originally from CA. After graduating, I wanted to move back home and work, but I needed what was called a clinical license to work at any hospital in CA, despite not wanting to be a nurse (some hospitals have research facilities where scientists like myself can do our research that can help the hospital). I studied biology in my undergrad and when I looked into getting a clinical license, I didn't meet a majority of the requirements; to me, it seemed like it would be hard to get the license without having studied nursing.

That being said, I don't think you necessarily *have* to go to school in CA for nursing to become a practicing nurse there. That is more of a personal decision that may be driven by a number of factors. The most important thing when considering schools is the quality of education you will get there, the accreditation of your program, and what opportunities you will have to do internships or in your case, perhaps be able to shadow in a hospital/intern in a hospital to get patient interaction experience. As long as the educational requirements and coursework align with the requirements for the clinical license in CA, you should be able to obtain that license to practice as an RN in CA regardless of where you went to school.

Jessica recommends the following next steps:

Look into what license/s may be required to be an RN/work as an RN in CA
make a list of the educational requirements for said license/s
look at which universities and colleges in CA (or outside of CA if you want to go out of state) have nursing programs
Compare the coursework from various schools to the requirements for CA licensure
Get in touch with RNs in CA who have gone to school in state and out of state to get their insight into obtaining their CA clincial license
Thank you comment icon Thank you! Veronica
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