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What do lawyers do on a day to day basis?


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John’s Answer

Not all Lawyers are created equal Keethana

People assume that a lawyer is a lawyer, and so any lawyer will be able to provide whatever legal services they need. While technically this is true because a lawyer is licensed to practice law (minus a few exceptions where further licensing is required), the law is so vast and all-encompassing that it is impossible for a single lawyer to effectively provide legal services across each different area of law. Much like doctors, where there is a focus on a specific area of the body, specific age groups, or specific types of ailments and diseases, lawyers typically specialize in one, or a few related types of law.

FIVER TYPES OF LAWERS JOB DESCRIPTIONS

CORPORATE LAWYER – Corporate lawyers are experts in business law and all related concepts. They defend clients and provide legal advisement, assistance and advocacy to corporations or government agencies in financial, securities or real estate law and other similar areas. They are subject to numerous educational and licensure requirements before becoming licensed corporate attorneys. They are well-versed in all of aspects of business and finance law, corporate disputes and resolutions, and white-collar crimes, criminals and penalties. Their job duties may include meeting with clients and other attorneys, preparing legal briefs, opening and closing courtroom arguments, conducting research and compiling evidence. Corporate lawyers generally work in private legal offices; however, some are employed by large law firms and others have their own private practice.

TRIAL LAWYER – Trial lawyers are attorneys who regularly represent a party in a trial and argue the client's case for them. A trial lawyer can be employed with the state, a business or with a private law firm. Regardless of their employer, trial lawyers examine all the necessary evidence, research laws and study judicial decisions that are relevant to the case at hand. Trial lawyers regularly meet with their clients to discuss their options and the strategy that is going to be taken once at the trial. Presenting a case at trial can be a difficult experience. Trial lawyers usually start with an opening argument, then as the trial moves on they take turns presenting evidence, addressing the judge and interviewing and cross-examining witnesses. At the end of the case, trial lawyers present a closing argument and await the decision of the judge or jury.

FAMILY LAWYER – You probably could have guessed what a family lawyer does. Family lawyers help manage legal problems between persons with familial relationships. These issues can include paternity, guardianship, juvenile delinquency, emancipation, custody, child support, adoption, and divorce. Family lawyers work in offices, courts, and educational settings. They may file legal documents, participate in mediation sessions, and offer advice to clients. A person who begins a family law career should be skilled in oral discussion, negotiation and effective debate and persuasion. The family lawyer should be observant and able to interact well with other people, even in highly stressful and emotional situations. Family lawyers also need good time management and organizational skills in order to manage multiple cases at a time. The length of time needed to build a successful practice depends upon the family lawyer's skills.

REAL ESTATE LAWYER – Real estate lawyers are responsible for the legal aspects of real estate matters such as land developments, purchases of property and asset transfers. They meet with clients, which can include large corporations and individuals, to advise them regarding possible legal issues they might encounter. They are responsible for reviewing all documents to ensure that they align with current property laws and regulations, in order to prevent negative repercussions from mistakes and loopholes. Lawyers draft legal documents including deeds, contracts, and agreements, as well as obtain required permits and titles. They prepare all necessary forms and paperwork, and file them with the appropriate institutions and courts. Real estate lawyers are responsible for making sure their clients understand the legal documents they are signing, and that they are satisfied with the terms of the agreement. They must comply with the standards and protocol determined by the law, both in their methods and in the work they produce.

TAX LAWYER
Tax attorneys resolve financial or tax law issues for their clients. After earning a bachelor's degree, aspiring tax attorneys must attend law school. This profession is considered lucrative, and job growth should be as fast as average over the next decade. When tax issues arise, the public generally turns to tax attorneys to help resolve the problems. Tax attorneys possess strong knowledge of tax laws and issues including income, property, gift and federal tax. Tax attorneys stay up-to-date with IRS regulations and tax laws in order to counsel clients on changes that affect their accounts. Tax attorneys also keep accurate records and develop plans to solve financial issues that affect his or her clients. However, a larger proportion of these lawyers actually go to court to defend you if the IRS audits you and you face potential jail time or significant fines. Most individual tax lawyers also work in estate planning in some fashion unless they work in the tax department of a large corporation.

You cannot practice law or call yourself an attorney without first meeting the professional requirements for becoming a lawyer. These are numerous and range from meeting educational standards and performing successfully in a bar exam, to clearing moral character and background checks. Keerthana below is a comprehensive list with descriptions of the standard prerequisites for the practice of law.


John recommends the following next steps:

Bachelor's Degree – Anyone who wants to pursue a law degree must first complete a bachelor's degree program (Pre-Law).
Law School Admission Test (LSAT) – After completing your bachelor's degree, you will need to take the LAST.
Law School – The next step is to graduate from or complete at least three years at a law school accredited by the American Bar Association
State Bar Exam – No matter how well you did in law school, you cannot legally practice law in a given state without passing that state's bar examination.
License – With completion of the above requirements Keerthana your ready for your law license and the oath that you'll uphold the codes U.S. Constitution.

Thank You Keerthana. Nothing is impossible, the word itself says “I’m possible.” John Frick

Thank You Vineeth. “We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.” — Winston Churchill John Frick

Thank you this was very insightful! Keerthana P.

Your Welcome, it was my Pleasure Keerthana. The real opportunity for success lies within the person and not in the job. John Frick

Thank You Alison. “As you grow older, you will discover that you have two hands — one for helping yourself, the other for helping others.” — Audrey Hepburn John Frick

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DENNIS’s Answer

Hi Keerthana: I was a trial lawyer in NYC for 37 years. I was in the second group of John's answer! Day to day things changed. Sometimes I was in Court on trial. Sometimes I was writting motions or briefs. Some days I was doing depositions. Everyday I was learning. I had to learn the case I was doing. Had to learn how to make things in products cases, construction in construction cases. And medicine. Had to learn a ton of medical issues over the years. So day to day things change when you're a trial lawyer. Kinda fit my personality. So read John's descriptions and consider which niche you would fit into. Those choices will dictate your day to day activities! Good luck!

Thank You! Keerthana P.

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Vineeth’s Answer

Lawyers represent clients in criminal and civil lawsuits and other legal proceedings, draw up legal documents, or manage or advise clients on legal transactions. May specialize in a single area or may practice broadly in many areas of law. They also analyze the probable outcomes of cases, using knowledge of legal precedents.

Other tasks include:

• Advise clients concerning business transactions, claim liability, the advisability of prosecuting or defending lawsuits, or legal rights and obligations.
• Select jurors, argue motions, meet with judges, and question witnesses during a trial.
• Interpret laws, rulings, and regulations for individuals and businesses.
• Present evidence to defend clients or prosecute defendants in criminal or civil litigation.
• Represent clients in court or before government agencies.
• Work in environmental law, representing public interest groups, waste disposal companies, or construction firms in their dealings with state and federal agencies.

Thank you! Keerthana P.

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Kim’s Answer

So, in addition to the outstanding answers you already received. . .

You may appear in court for several different cases in one day. These could be pre-trial motions, which are usually pretty simple, in and out. Of course, if you have a full trial, you clear your calendar of everything else.

If you work in a small practice, or are a solo practitioner, you may have to deal with many other things. This would be everything from a broken copier machine to personnel matters, to billing. It will depend on how much support staff you have.

Attorneys can have very hectic days, with frequent interruptions and changes to plans, so it is important to be flexible enough to roll with the changes!

Thank You! Keerthana P.

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Hanna’s Answer

Hi Keerthana, there is also the "in-house lawyer", who is a lawyer working in a company. This means that they are employed by a company, not a law firm. An in-house lawyer works on all legal issues that concern the activities of that particular company. They advise colleagues on legal questions relating to many different areas, such as contracts, company law, employment, intellectual property, data privacy, health and safety etc. Depending on the size of the company they might be working on their own or as part of a bigger legal department. They often work together with "external counsel", who are an external law firm. The external law firm helps the in-house lawyer on specific topics where in-depth legal advice is required, or they help with litigation issues, i.e. if the company is involved in a legal dispute. In big international companies, an in-house lawyer might also be in contact with external law firms based in countries, where the company doesn't have its own offices, but is e.g. involved in a project in that country. As regards their day-to-day work, it involves reviewing contracts, providing legal advice to colleagues, collaborating with the legal department on projects, providing training to the company's employees on contracts or claims management for example, liaising with external law firms and preparing shareholder meetings. The work of an in-house lawyer is very varied and gives you a lot of insight into how companies work. And you work mainly with non-lawyers. I hope this adds to the above answers.

Thank you this was very insightful! Keerthana P.

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Donisha’s Answer

Lawyers affect our everyday lives in countless ways. They are involved in everything from buying a home to writing a will, to prosecuting and defending criminals. They counsel, strategize, problem-solve, write, advocate, negotiate.

Thank you! Keerthana P.

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Richard’s Answer

My wife is a bankruptcy attorney. From what she tells me, it depends what kind of lawyer you wish to be. Some appellate attorneys spend a lot of time researching and writing briefs (arguments to the Court). Others are trial attorneys and enjoy speaking in front of others. There are so many different kinds of specialties of lawyers. If you find your niche, you learn that one area. Choose the field that suits you best so you will be happy going to work every day.

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Alison’s Answer

Adding to some of the others comments, please allow me to share some examples.

I recruit for a biopharma company and have hired paralegals, contract specialists, and lawyers in various specialties such as litigation (defending any accusations consumers make about products), advertising and promotional review (dealing with claims a company makes about their products), regulatory (making sure the various teams in R&D and commercial marketing/sales know the rules of the country/countries where products are being developed, manufactured, and sold), business development & licensing transactions (determining where a company should venture into new partnerships or industry advancements), privacy/compliance (making sure the company's data is safe and properly handled and that teams are following the rules - related to regulatory), real-estate/shared services/intellectual property/patents (handles the rights of a company as compared to competitors or those who'd try to steal ideas, as well as when mergers between companies happen), corporate affairs (this can be related to internal and external communications, engagement in the political arena, hiring and employment practices, etc.), and so many other areas.

These folks help advise business partners to make good decisions. I've heard many great in-house lawyers say that their desire is to be seen as a true collaborator rather than the one who always says "no" to things. Getting a company to transition to proactive preparation and activity rather than always having to be reactive (typically to negative situations) is one of the biggest challenges.

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