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What career would be the best suited for me?

I am open to almost all careers. I am good at math and writing but struggle with history. I can be quite forgetful sometimes as well. #business #university #career-options


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12 answers


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Anne’s Answer

Those are very broad skills and can be applied to anything. I would have a few follow up questions to help understand a little more.

How are you at test taking? Should you consider a field where you need certifications?
Can you expand on the bad memory? Is it just with historic facts, or do you struggle with remember formulas/concepts?
Are you an organized person?
What kind of writing do you like? Are you good at things like writing an email/letter, or do you prefer short stories?
What kind of math do you like? Stats? Trig? Algebra?


I have a few recos' with limited information, but these careers are a good start for you to look into.

Consider:
Finance/ Financial Advising- little memory, and many tools and resources are available for you
Project management
Computer programmer
Pharmacy


Stay away from:
Medicine- if you're forgetful, probably best to stay away from this field
Marketing- remembering people's names
Lawyer/Law/Law Enforcment
Teacher

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Kathryn’s Answer

Hi Peyton! I'm also a math person and struggle with history. My brain is much better suited for logic vs. remembering events. I studied Mathematics and Economics in college. I would recommend either of these majors or even statistics/actuarial science. With the exception of Actuarial Science, all 3 majors are very broad based and can prepare you for multiple careers. It leaves you with a lot of flexibility after graduation to apply for jobs across multiple industries. Employers like to see Math/Econ because it shows you're able to think. Problem solving and logic are very desirable skills. When I was in college I had an internship at an advertising agency. Post college I applied for jobs in finance, banking, insurance, government and marketing. I ended up at Allstate where I'm in data analytics. I continue to use my math degree even 5 years post college. I also find having soft-skills, such as strong communication, very helpful in very technical roles. Being able to do advance analytics but then communicate the findings in layman terms to non-analytical business partners is one of the best skills to have in business.

Best of luck!
-Katy

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Amanda’s Answer

Hi Peyton! Reading your message, I really saw myself a few years ago. I am on the last half of my Mathematics degree, and I am studying to be a teacher as well. If you choose to follow a carreer in Math, you can be certain that you're going to improve your skills with math, logic, strategic thinking, and maybe this is also going to help you to forget things a little less (it happened to me!). I chose to study for being a teacher to use my writing skills too, and while I though about only one thing, I gained a lot more. Learning about how to teach people has made me a better person in many ways, I am more comprehensive, thoughful, I deal better with people, I can communicate better, and so on. I am truly grateful for being where I am today.

As for a carreer path, with Mathematics, of course, you can not only teach, but also work with statistics, information technology, you can research, and a lot more. Nowadays there are lots of amazing companies looking for mathematicians for a large range of jobs. This is something you can work on during your time studying (for anything you choose, actually), find the subject you like the most and invest on finding this on the job market. I found out I want to work with technology a few months ago, with more than half of college already done! Now for my future, I want to keep working with technology and also be a college professor in this area.

I'm sure you are going to do well, you have a great path to discover and follow.

Good luck!

Amanda

Amanda recommends the following next steps:

Make some research on Mathematics carreer

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Samantha’s Answer

Hello!

There are so many careers that you can choose from! You could be a math teacher at really any level, a scientist, an auditor, work at a bank or with money in general. There are so many options for you. I would look at different places that you can look to shadow for a few days to see if it is something that you truly want to pursue throughout college. I would also advise that you talk to a school advisor about your career choices. They can help narrow down your options!

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Patrick’s Answer

Concept borrow from one of my favorite author may help.
Find your 3 intersections between what you are most passionate about (what you like to do and have fun doing), now hopefully what you enjoy, you are also best at (why wouldn't you be if you enjoy and practice like crazy) and that it can generate an income.

Once you find those that fit within the 3, then you have a great starting point with your personalize career options.

Hope that helps

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Julietta’s Answer

Hey Peyton!

There are an endless amount of career opportunities for you to choose from! I cannot advise one way or another especially since your skillset will open many doors for you. What I can say is that you should use this time in college to explore different areas of interest you may have. They offer many classes in various topics for you to explore and decide on what you enjoy.

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Joseph’s Answer

To start with you can be an Architect or be in any field in engineering. You can also be a Statistician a math tutor or a professor. You could also be an accountant and do well.

Hi Joseph, these are interesting fields. Why did you recommend these specific careers? Gurpreet Lally

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Alex’s Answer

Hi Peyton, I would recommend remaining open minded about career opportunities and encourage you to continue honing your math and writing skills (which you enjoy, and are good at). Coding is a skill that is increasingly relevant and you could take a course in coding if you haven't aready explored. For example, General Assembly has free courses you can check out: https://dash.generalassemb.ly/

Writing is a skill that will serve you well no matter what field you ultimately get in to as being able to communicate your ideas clearly is so important. Keep practicing and improving!

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Anne’s Answer

Those are very broad skills and can be applied to anything. I would have a few follow up questions to help understand a little more.

How are you at test taking? Should you consider a field where you need certifications?
Can you expand on the bad memory? Is it just with historic facts, or do you struggle with remember formulas/concepts?
Are you an organized person?
What kind of writing do you like? Are you good at things like writing an email/letter, or do you prefer short stories?
What kind of math do you like? Stats? Trig? Algebra?


I have a few recos' with limited information, but these careers are a good start for you to look into.

Consider:
Finance/ Financial Advising- little memory, and many tools and resources are available for you
Project management
Computer programmer
Pharmacy


Stay away from:
Medicine- if you're forgetful, probably best to stay away from this field
Marketing- remembering people's names
Lawyer/Law/Law Enforcment
Teacher

0
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Amy’s Answer

I am good at math and writing as well! I found I've enjoyed my career in Information Technology a lot. Being good at writing helps you to communicate highly technical concepts effectively so others can understand. And being good at math and writing makes it easier for one to learn how to write code (essentially a marriage of the two). I would suggest looking in to a computer science or programming degree, or at least meet with a few folks in the IT industry and see what you think.

Good luck!
Amy

Amy recommends the following next steps:

Look at computer science and/or programming degrees in college
Meet with some IT professionals and learn more about the day to day work

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Jayne’s Answer

Keep your mind open at this stage and focus on the subjects you enjoy the most and are good at - like math and English. Both are solid subjects that can lead to a variety of careers. The key is to do well at these and then decide, rather than narrow your options too early. It could be that as you are studying, a particular area jumps out at you - like programming, or economics. Also, you will find that when you take a job, there are usually opportunities, particularly early in your career, to move around the company or organisation and try a few different roles. You can also look for grad jobs which specifically do this in the first few years. You can also select jobs (such as consultancy) that give you insights into a broad range of industries while you continue to find what really interests you.

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Gloria’s Answer

Hi Peyton,

At the end of the day, this decision is up to you. You should consider what are you doing now that you would like to do for the rest of your life. You need to tap into your own passions for guidance on what you want to do as a job. You are the only person who knows the right now. If you are not sure, you need to explore options that are around you. Since you have no bias in any direction, allow yourself to engage in skills that you may not have. You should ask people around you who work if you can job shadow them. You may also want to consider volunteering with various organizations. Some of the jobs that you will do with them are jobs that pay at companies. You can learn a skill or watch a skill and find inspiration.

I would also recommend going to college. At most colleges, part of your studies is basic classes across a cross section of subjects. This will allow you to study areas you are not familiar with and find inspiration there. I have known many people who do not do the job that they thought they would as a kid. That came from exploring options that you did consider because you didn't know they existed.

Good luck finding the job of your dreams.
Gloria

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