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How do you know if going into the Nursing field is good for you?

I'm interested in going into the Nursing field, specifically in the Labor and Delivery field. I'm Elizabeth and I'm in 11th grade. Some of the skills that are needed to be a Labor and Delivery Nurse (LD Nurse) is having empathy, critical thinking, decision-making and communication skills, which is good for me because I'm good in most of these areas and I like to help people. By others answering my question I will then review them and see their stories and recommendations to my question. The reason why I'm asking this question is I seen a lot of YouTube videos about what it's like going into this field, how they started out and how it's currently going for them and I just wanted to know how other people got interested in this field as well.
hospital nursing career field highschool # general

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Rachael’s Answer

Great question! I have been in the nursing field for over 30 years. I worked in Labor and Delivery only in my clinical rotation in nursing school. I got started in Nursing School by volunteering at my local hospital at the age of 16 through a High School Program. I saw Nurses and Doctors and other employees of the hospital and was absolutely motivated by their desire to help others and I was hooked! I knew I wanted to be a Nurse.
Nursing isn't for the faint of heart, but at the end of the day it is well worth it for me. You have to think quick on your feet, have critical and logical thinking, understand that people are in a different place when their patients (their scared, lonely, desperate, uncertain, happy, mad) and have so many different emotions that you as a nurse have to help manage. You will need to laugh with them, hold their hand, tell them the truth; and that takes a toll on you. When you are a nurse, you are there to help and serve, to care and provide, and take on their physical, mental and emotional states when sometimes its not all roses and butterflies.
I would say that if you have a desire to serve, can think on your feet, understand the different emotions of people, can handle the physical aspects of caring for another person (the gore) then nursing could be a great career for you!
Good luck!
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Yasemin’s Answer

Hi Elizabeth! One of my good friends is in nursing school right now, she also works part time as a patient care monitor and has also taken shifts in labor and delivery! I think for anything healthcare career related it is really important to make sure you have experience in this area. I would advise to volunteer and maybe even work in a healthcare area to see if you really like it. I think the ambition is great and is a truly helpful field. As a volunteer I saw many nurses communicating and assisting their patients in many ways; my good friend also has this ambition and passion to help others. In labor and delivery especially you will need to have compassion and be helpful as this can be a nervous moment for the mother. It does take a lot of drive, ambition and hard work but will definitely pay off in the end once you get to see that you made a difference in a patient's life. Along with volunteering, I would also check out the prerequisites because science classes are needed, so it is important to feel comfortable taking them. If you can take any AP classes in high school such as biology or chemistry, or an Anatomy and Physiology class it can also be helpful in getting you exposed to the academic side of healthcare so that you may feel more comfortable in college.

I wish you the best!
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Jessica’s Answer

When I was in high school I dreamed of being a Nurse but I was a little lost on the whole process and trying to choose a school. I decided my best option was to join the military and be a Hospital Corpsman which is basically a nursing assistant. From there I would be able to see what nurses do, get school paid for and have more time to find the bet path for me. I am finishing up my seventh year in the Navy and just left the inpatient floor which includes Labor and delivery. I was able to talk to a lot of the Nurses active duty and civilian who work on that floor and the big take a way that I was that you have to be a critical thinker and be calm even when emotions are high in the room. Plus you have to be use to seeing a lot of blood and ready to catch a baby in case the doctor doesn't make it in time.
As far as nursing in general, it is a lot more charting than people think and waiting on the doctors before you can do certain things. After being at hospitals for seven years I am personally not a fan. It is hard work and not the best hours depending on what else your life style. It just wasn't for me, going this route helped me learn that and truly find my passion though.

Jessica recommends the following next steps:

I would start off by volunteering or getting a job as a medical assistant as you go through school to get your basic classes done. By doing this you will be able to see the behind the scenes of what Nurses do and maybe you'll take interest in another specialty of nursing besides L&D. Most places when you start out like you to rotate the wards first so you can create a foundation first. That is one good thing about the military is that they provide you with the experience so that when you get out and start applying for jobs you already have hands on experience which will put you a head of other people.
Definitely do your research on schools. The nursing programs tend to be pretty competitive so make sure you love to study. L&D nurses are amazing though they are people that the patients wont forget on their special day. So if you have the passion for it you will make a great Nurse. Goo Luck!
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Updated Translate

Jessica’s Answer

When I was in high school I dreamed of being a Nurse but I was a little lost on the whole process and trying to choose a school. I decided my best option was to join the military and be a Hospital Corpsman which is basically a nursing assistant. From there I would be able to see what nurses do, get school paid for and have more time to find the bet path for me. I am finishing up my seventh year in the Navy and just left the inpatient floor which includes Labor and delivery. I was able to talk to a lot of the Nurses active duty and civilian who work on that floor and the big take a way that I was that you have to be a critical thinker and be calm even when emotions are high in the room. Plus you have to be use to seeing a lot of blood and ready to catch a baby in case the doctor doesn't make it in time.
As far as nursing in general, it is a lot more charting than people think and waiting on the doctors before you can do certain things. After being at hospitals for seven years I am personally not a fan. It is hard work and not the best hours depending on what else your life style. It just wasn't for me, going this route helped me learn that and truly find my passion though.

Jessica recommends the following next steps:

I would start off by volunteering or getting a job as a medical assistant as you go through school to get your basic classes done. By doing this you will be able to see the behind the scenes of what Nurses do and maybe you'll take interest in another specialty of nursing besides L&D. Most places when you start out like you to rotate the wards first so you can create a foundation first. That is one good thing about the military is that they provide you with the experience so that when you get out and start applying for jobs you already have hands on experience which will put you a head of other people.
Definitely do your research on schools. The nursing programs tend to be pretty competitive so make sure you love to study. L&D nurses are amazing though they are people that the patients wont forget on their special day. So if you have the passion for it you will make a great Nurse. Goo Luck!
0