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How should I customize my basic resume on applying to a fast food restaurant or a clothing store?

I want to know what a basic resume needs in order for me to apply for a job I want. Such as working at a mall, fast food, clothing stores, and so on. I have never worked in my life and i am also a senior in high school so I came here to find out how I can customize my resume and give a good first impression to the owners/bosses. #job-search #food

Thank you comment icon The last time that I had a lot of work experience at Harper as a student worker is two school years and I did a lot of jobs like café preparation, stocking food and drinks, and delivering specials to Starbucks/Subway. I bet that is good exercise by walking in so many directions. Well, Ms. Gray and I have been talking about this at work and this is really an active job when I’m feeling stressed a lot. Grace H.
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Subject: Career question for you

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John’s Answer

Annette when writing your first resume with no work experience, it's appropriate to include school, GPA, internships and community activities. Don't forget to look at volunteer work, civic groups, and youth organizations (for example, the Scouts or 4-H). The skills you have developed doing these things have given you valuable experience that will impress employers. For your first resume, take the soft skills (also known as “people skills”) you have and show how they translate into success where you choose to apply them. Include school achievements, sports, clubs, and organizations you belong to. Other “people skills” that employers often seek in entry-level job applicants include traits like dependability, good communication and organizational skills, a solid work ethic, and teamwork.

When writing your first resume, it’s a good idea to look at resume examples. They can help you decide how to format your resume and what kind of information to include. Using a template will make it easier to create your resume. Not only will it save you time, but it can also reduce formatting errors. Make sure to change any sample resume to include information that is specific to you and the job you are applying for. Many people are surprised to learn that resume design is just as important as content, but it’s absolutely true. Research suggests that your resume has only seconds to make the right impression, so it must be eye-catching and easy to read. Because employers get so many job applications, something small, such as a typo, could cost you a job. Be sure to thoroughly proofread your resume before sending it to an employer. Read it for any spelling and grammar errors, as well as for any inconsistencies in format (such as using different styles of bullet points). Ask a friend or family member or a guidance or career services counselor to look at it for you as well.

One final piece of advice. If you really want a job you will need to be persistant. Always ask if the manager is available when you go to complete a job application and/or drop off your resume. If the manager is not available ask when he or she might be later in the day or week. Keep following up until you are told there are no positions or that they are not interested in hiring you. Finding and obtaining your first real job is a rite of passage for most teens. It's an exciting and scary experience but one that will serve you well — both for the money you earn and for the lessons you learn.

Happy Hunting Annette
Thank you comment icon Thank You Jonathan. “The smallest act of kindness is worth more than the grandest intention.” – Oscar Wilde John Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank You Madison. “Volunteers are the only human beings on the face of the earth who reflect this nation’s compassion, unselfish caring, patience, and just plain loving one another.” – Erma Bombeck John Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank You Matthew. “We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.” — Winston Churchill John Frick
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Kim’s Answer

Annette,

What seems to be working for many young people in our area is to first go to the place where you want to work, and ask to speak to the manager. The manager will then tell you to go on-line and apply. He/she may tell you the particular store number, and tell you to enter that on the application where it asks for "preferred location." Make SURE that the manager knows your name. Try to get them to take a copy of your resume (I'll get to this in a second!) By doing this, they will be looking for your application when they do the hiring. Also try to sell yourself, really quickly. Something like "I live nearby, and have some customer service experience from working in school carwashes, and I work well with others, having been on the basketball team." (This is referred to as "the elevator pitch". . . and you will be continually refining it throughout your career.)

Next, do the on-line application. SLOWLY. Read everything. Everything. Having worked at the Workforce Office computer lab, I can tell you the number one cause of problems with on-line applications was failure to read. If it asks for "work history" it may say: "do NOT include school activities or volunteer activities. " Ability to follow instructions is one of the things they are evaluating you on. Don't blow it! Most of the on-line application portals allow you to upload a resume. So, upload yours. Make a note of your user ID and password so you can get back in to see if there are any updates.

There is often an on-line assessment you have to do. Some of them are relevant. Some make no sense at all. I took one for Walmarts just to see what you are dealing with. If that is not one of the places you intend to apply, you might want to do it for practice before doing the ones you are interested in. Throughout your job-search process, and while answering these questions, always remember this: The purpose of business is to MAKE MONEY. Your challenge is to show how you will help the company to make, or save, money. Examples:
1. Excellent customer service. Bad customer service sends customers to the internet, and it spreads like wildfire.
2. Safety: When customers get hurt, the company pays the medical bills, and, may face a lawsuit. When employees get hurt, it means they can't work, and it makes the company have to work short-handed or pay overtime for someone else to fill in.
3. Regulatory compliance: Checking IDs when serving alcohol, for example. COVID safety protocol.
4. Dependability: If you have a job, they need you to show up!
Think about how you can show these things through school activities. Science lab safety. Learning a bunch of rules for basketball. Attendance record, etc.

Anyway, back to the assessment. Remember you are applying for entry-level positions. You aren't expected to be able to handle complex problems by yourself, but, at the same time, you shouldn't bother your supervisor for every little thing. So, sometimes the answer might be to check with a co-worker, rather than a supervisor. Just do the best you can!

Many people get these sort of entry-level jobs without even having a resume. It's really not required or even expected. However, it shows an effort above and beyond that of other people, and I think it's a great idea! I recommend you check out a website called gotresumebuilder.com It is free with a library card or student ID. There are two things that are great about this site. One, it gives you suggestions. And two, it gives you total control over the sections. You can rearrange them, rename them, delete them, or add more! On the "content" tab, to the right of the resume, is the "manage resume sections" button. Don't get carried away with a lot of extra words trying to look impressive. Keep it short and sweet, respecting the hiring manager's time. But, on the other hand, don't just list activities without explaining how they relate to the working world! Example:
Basketball team: Timely attended all training sessions. Assisted newer team members with learning plays and skills. Assisted coach with yearly equipment inventory.
Band: Supervised the car wash, making sure all cars were cleaned to the customer's expectations. Controlled the cash fund.

Not all hiring managers think alike. So, just because you don't get called don't think there is something wrong with your resume! Give it time! Also, please understand you are competing against a lot of people because of the current economic conditions. Be persistent and stay confident!!

Finally, if you are thinking of going to college, and working while in school, try to get a job someplace with tuition assistance. You will need to find this information on the website. Perhaps Bill Miller's, HEB, etc. HEB seems to be hiring a lot of order selectors for curbside grocery service. I'm not positive these places offer tuition assistance, although I would think that they do. It'd be great to get some help with college expenses!

Best of luck to you!!
Kim




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Sheila’s Answer

Hi Annette:

I'd suggest keeping your resume basic as possible. A resume is a one-page summary of your work and school experiences. Employers match your resume against their job openings to evaluate if you'd be a good fit. As such, it's important to make your resume a good representation of yourself. You've received some great advice from the previous posters. I assisted my young adults in creating their first resume. Here's an outline on what was on it. . .

TOP HEADING (Name, Address, Telephone, Email)
SCHOOL
WORK EXPERIENCE
ORGANIZATIONS & LEADERSHIP
COMMUNITY SERVICE

- - - - S A M P L E - - - -

JANE X. DOE
12345 American Drive
Miami, FL

SCHOOL
American High School, September 2016 - June 2019
Miami, FL

WORK EXPERIENCE
• Dr. Pamela Wright, MD (Internal Medicine), May 2019 - June 2019
Summer Internship, Miami, FL

• Fancy Clothes, March 2018 - May 2019
Store Associate, Miami, FL

ORGANIZATIONS & LEADERSHIP
• American High School Honors Program, 2016 - 2019
• Varsity & Junior Cheerleader Squad, 2016 - 2019
• National Honor Society, 2016 - 2018

COMMUNITY SERVICE
• Helping Feed People, 2017 - 2018
• Big Barks Animal Shelter, 2016 - 2018

There are many resume styles and templates out there. This one tend to work for my young adults and have been transitioned into a friends and family template. I wish you much success o n your journey. Good luck to you!

Sheila recommends the following next steps:

Creating Your Resume • https://myfuture.com/career/creating-your-resume
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Jojo’s Answer

Hello there! I agree with what many respondents have already answered, but just wanted to add a few tidbits that may be of help. Your resume is, basically, a snapshot of who you are on paper. Most employers won't look at it for more than a few minutes, so you want to make sure you highlight what you believe is most important about yourself. Think about the activities you've been a part of on campus: were you in a leadership position, any teams/working with others, unique experiences, community service, etc. From this list, write down some of the attributes of yourself or the things you've learned that you want employers to know about you. Since it seems you're looking for a fast food restaurant/clothing store, you might want to highlight teamwork, leadership, communication, or service. While each of these things may seem broad, they are definitely applicable to a job you may be applying to.

I would also recommend that while your resume should be simple, clear, and concise, it should also contain enough information to give employers a good picture of who you are. A way to do this is by using the B-A-R method of Background, Action, and Result. Make sure you've given enough context (but not the whole detailed story!), then highlight what you did, and what came of it! You may also want to ensure that you use "action" verbs to stay concise. For example, a bullet point on a club leadership position could look like this: Managed a team of 6 peers to host an Open Mic Night fundraising event that raised $300 for [some organization]. While not fully fleshed out, it highlights how many people you worked with, what the event was/what it was for, and what the result was. One last thing I would recommend is to make sure you've formatted it nicely and reviewed it for any small mistakes (commas, periods, spaces, spelling, etc.). Best of luck!
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Steve’s Answer

Hi Annette,

For a fast food restaurant or retail store, I would focus your CV (resume) on these important traits.

1) You are people friendly (these are a people business)
2) You love to serve others, and be helpful
3) You enjoy working hard, and strive for success
4) You enjoy business, and perhaps mention some of the business courses you have taken or will take soon
5) You want to manage people, if you like that of course, and ask about steps to become as Assistant Manager during the interview

Most of all, enjoy the journey as you will likely enjoy multiple industries and work types over your career.
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Victoria’s Answer

Hi! I would say look into the skills that you have developed through other activities you've had and tailor it to the skills needed in the job you are applying for. For instance if you are applying for a clothing store - think about what skills you would need to be successful at that job. Then think about your own experiences and leverage that into your resume.

Ex: Clothing Store - skills in team work would be important - leverage an experience in lets say being on a sports team
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Marini’s Answer

Good Afternoon Annette,

I assisted my children with their resumes when they did not have any work experience. Being that you are a high school student, you are not expected to have much experience, if any.

Online templates are a good start. Try this link: https://templates.office.com/en-us/resume-templates

Select a template that you would like to use and populate it with the type of information listed below. Do not worry if you do not have any volunteer experience or have not participated in any extracurricular activities. It is just something to add, if you have them.

The top of your resume will include:

Your name, address, telephone number and email address.

Next:

Education - Your High school Name, City & State, and Month/Year start - Present

Next:

Volunteer Experience - Name the experience, the dates (Month/Year start - Month Year end), brief description of the tasks you performed while volunteering.

Next:

Extra Curricular Activities - Name the activity/activities and the dates (Month/Year start - Month/Year end)

Last:

Computer Skills - list the computer software you have used (i.e. Microsoft Word, Excel, etc.)

That's it! When you start working, keep your resume up to date for the next job you may interested in applying. You can use the job description to populate the tasks completed.

Good Luck!
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Abbey’s Answer

Hi Annette! You've come to the right place to ask that question and I can see that you've already received great advice within the responses.

I was in the same position as you in my senior year of high school with no job experience under my belt. From my experience, I definitely recommend going to any places you are applying in person and politely ask if the manager is in. Even if the application process is online only, make sure to submit beforehand and let the manager know that you just wanted to come by in person and introduce yourself. If a manager is busy or not working that day, any other employee is still likely to relay their first impression of you to the manager. This helps tremendously to make the personal connection so they can put a face with the name when reviewing your application and appreciate the initiative and effort you made to go in person.

Additionally, no matter what job I was applying for (retail, golf course, restaurant, etc.) I made sure to dress in business casual attire when going to meet the manager. This will make a good first impression in terms of professionalism as well as an indicator that you can carry yourself well in front of customers.

Best of luck and feel free to reach out with any other questions you may have!

Abbey
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Amela’s Answer

Annette,

Like you, when I was a senior in high school, I had no professional work experience. Nobody has a million lines on their resume at that age, so you are already on the right track by trying to figure out what to include.

Make sure to include any academic teams/ competitions, volunteer experience, sports teams, extracurricular activities, or clubs at school you are involved with and any leadership positions you have held. For example, I was involved in a business competition in high school, and I included that on my resume. This will help an employer get to know you and what you are interested in. It's also important to have an open attitude and show employers that you are eager to learn.

Ultimately, try not to worry too much about not having had previous work experience. If you show employers you are driven and are excited about the opportunity, it should not be an issue. Good luck!
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Maddie’s Answer

Hey Annette!

Googling templates can help you get an idea of the basic formatting for a resume and usually there are usually 3-4 sections. Education, Skills, Experience, and Volunteer experience. You mentioned that you've never had a job before so you may not have an experience section. I worked at Subway when I was in high school, and the manager asked me questions based on my timeliness, teamwork and organization skills. Those are some of the things they care about most. Especially being on time. If you have anything you've done in high school - sports, theater, yearbook - something that shows you've had to work with others is something you could add. If you've gotten good grades or are in honors or AP classes you could add that to the education section to show you work hard.

Google is also super helpful in how to word things. You don't want to have big long paragraphs; you want something that people can read easily and quickly. I try to keep the formatting simple but add unique details, like a box around the header to make it stand out a bit. Nothing, wild but something that shows I put effort into making the resume.

I hope that helps! Let me know if you have more questions. Good luck!

Maddie
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Michael’s Answer

Hey,

I'd just make a simple resume. Use a template like people have suggested above. Put down your Gpa, school activities, team sports, and volunteer work.

It should be a simple resume. The most important thing is to dress well and give a good first impression when you go the store or restuant you want to work at.

Once, you get your first job, interviews, resume work all gets easier and easier.

Michael
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